by CaroPosted on

“When I was a kid, I wanted to become an inventor,” says artist Adam Pizurny. “I fulfilled my dream but in a slightly different way.” Now living and working in Prague, Czech republic, Pizury has built an eclectic career out of his experimentation in digital illustration and graphic design. But in 2012, he discovered an exciting new technique when blind artist George Redhawk aka “DarkAngelØne”, featured here, transformed one of his portraits into a GIF.

by CaroPosted on

Pretty much every kid loves playing with cardboard boxes. Taiwanese photographer and graphic designer Sydney Sie never stopped playing with them. Her series “Unexpectable Boxes” captures the essence of our childhood pretending in surprising and surreal photographs. In bold candy colors, her images reveal her subjects’ faces, fingers and feet peeking out of holes in artificial spaces built by Sie.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

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Nancy Liang creates diorama-like collages out of hand-drawn elements on kraft paper. Her nearly monochromatic work features nocturnal scenes of small towns that seem to become enchanted at the stroke of midnight. Liang reworks her pieces digitally to create GIFs with subtle, animated elements. While some artists’ GIFs entrance viewers with their bold, flashing colors, Liang animates strategic details, like glittering stars or wispy smoke coming from a flame. Based in Sydney, Australia, Liang makes GIFs in her spare time and posts them on her Tumblr. By day, she is an award-winning commercial illustrator.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Orcas and wolves traverse the digital land and sea in TJ Fuller’s holographic-looking GIFs. Fuller is an artist who wears many hats: In addition to his personal work, he creates iPad apps for cats (seriously, games for your cat!) and is an animation director for Maker Studios. His personal work has a lo-fi aesthetic, like a DIY VHS recording where colors appeared pixelated. With his CMYK color palette, his pieces have a digital glow to them that contrasts with their nature-inspired subject matter.

by Eva RecinosPosted on

Self-taught photographer Jon Jacobsen creates portraits that feel like the stuff of beautiful nightmares. In fact, he operates on the idea that reality and fantasy might not be so far from each other as we think. His portraits and self-portraits reflect the fragility of human nature and many works echo the symbolic language and dark beauty of memento mori pieces. The colorful, swirling lines that emanate from his subjects seem to hint at another person or personality. What could look like a placid, somewhat Classical portrait becomes disturbing and distorted. It’s hard to tell whether the subjects are rotting away or actually transforming into their true shape.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

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When Insa presents his street art GIFs to people, they often think that he went back on Photoshop after painting a piece and animated it digitally. However, what the artist refers to as GIF-iti is painted entirely by hand, one frame at a time. Each layer of the artwork is photographed at a specific time of day to keep the lightning consistent, resulting in a moving mural created by way of stop-motion animation. Insa recently painted such a piece in Paris on a billboard along the River Seine. Painted over the course of two days (in the rain, mind you), the final, moving piece we see here was created using eight layers and 72 total skulls painted at different angles. The colorful work is titled “C’est La Vie” — a tongue-in-cheek name considering the subject matter. Check out some process shots after the jump.