by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

London artist duo Mariana Fantich and Dominic Young, collectively known as Fantich & Young, create innovative sculptures using found objects. Fantich & Young’s humorous series “Apex Predator” envisions a fantastical twist in the history of evolution. The artists glued individual teeth from dentures on to various types of footwear to create menacing-looking shoes with a bite. Stacked in rows like sharks’ teeth, the dentures give the shoes menacing grins that warn one not to get to close.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Chris Jones’s large-scale sculptural work looks fragile even though his subject matter often focuses on objects we presume to be tough, stable — even nearly unbreakable. In his current show at Mark Straus Gallery in New York City, a sports car melts and unravels before our eyes. A motorcycle tempts us to scratch and peel away its layers. Houses disintegrate into heaps of deteriorating objects. Jones works with abandoned and disused materials — old magazines, books, encyclopedias, paper ephemera and even trash — to create papier mache pieces that destabilize our view of the world around us. We create our environments through the accumulation of objects and materials. Jones’s latest body of work pulls us back, reminding us how ephemeral and artificial these things are. It’s a bleak reminder that material objects and the world we’ve built will not stand the test of time.