by Andy SmithPosted on


The sculptures of Yoshitoshi Kanemaki bend and distort the human form. Often using the repetition of facial features as a means to explore the endless emotions contained within a subject, his use of wood adds a complexity to both the texture of his figures and the skill required. The artist was featured in Hi-Fructose Vol. 38 and he last appeared on HiFructose.com here.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Artist Beth Cavener’s stoneware sculptures present creatures from the natural world in eerie, new lights. A new show at Jason Jacques Gallery in New York City collects new pieces from the artist. “The Other” presents works from the sculptor of several moods and approaches. Five “new major works” are presented in the show. Cavener was last featured on HiFructose.com here, and she was part of the Turn the Page: The First 10 Years of Hi-Fructose exhibition.

by Andy SmithPosted on

South Korean illustrator Jo In Hyuk crafts delicate, stunning illustrations with a dash of drama injected into each figure. The artist’s deceptively simple studies use soft colors and irregular angles to push the intimacy. And though sparse, the intended emotion behind the works can be mystifying.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Using materials like glass, bronze, and other metals, Ukraine-born artist Nazar Bilyk creates surreal figures that shift perspectives and expectations. Much of his work is an exploration of man’s relationship with the natural world. Whether in a public art context or an indoor setting, the works toys with the viewer, depending on his or her distance from the work.

by Andy SmithPosted on

The acrylic paintings of Coco Bergholm explore the idea of camouflage in an urban context. Recent paintings, in particular, see the Berlin-based artist using pops of color, differing textures, and graffiti to explore this notion. A new show at Germany’s Affenfaust Galerie, titled “Echoes,” collects these new works.

by Andy SmithPosted on


Atlanta-based sculptor Christina A. West creates busts and installations that add abstraction to realism. The pops of color present throughout her work add intrigue into each scene or person depicted. She says that each of pieces start “with an interest in interiority—the thoughts, feelings, psychology within our bodies—often highlighting the inherent mystery, or inaccessibility, of interiority.”