by Andy SmithPosted on

Dan Gluibizzi, a Portland-based artist, mixes acrylics and watercolors for his works, each a collection of portraits that together create social examinations. Whether his subjects are in business attire or unclothed, an intimacy carries throughout the sparse works. The artist scours the Internet, specifically nudist blogs and Tumblrs, for inspiration in creating his paintings.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Italian sculptor Gehard Demetz uses small “building blocks” to construct his figurative works. In a new series of sculptures, “Introjection,” the artist pairs figures with personal belongings and religious objects “to highlight the psychological undercurrent between an individual and their belongings, and how the external can become internalized as part of the self.” The series is part of a new show at Jack Shainman Gallery in New York City, kicking off April 27 and lasting through June 3. Demetz was last featured on HiFructose.com here, and he was involved in “Turn the Page: The First Ten Years of Hi-Fructose,” which is currently at the Akron Art Museum.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Jaz Harold, a multidisciplinary artist based in New York and Tokyo, creates sculptures that mix the alluring with the unsettling. These works seem to treat the human body like a fungus, growing and duplicating itself and occasionally, behaving in a parasitic manner. The artist says her work “explores the connection between the ego, feminism, sexuality, and the flow of both inter- and intra-personal energy.”

by Andy SmithPosted on

For the past few decades, New York City-based painter Lisa Yuskavage has challenged norms in figurative art and blended progressive concepts with acknowledgement to the history of the form.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Inside a Charlotte studio, a hundred faces peer in different directions. These are the unsettling, yet engrossing sculptures of Dustin Farnsworth, a current resident at the McColl Center for Art + Innovation. As the artist prepared for his upcoming show, titled “Tell Me More,” he spoke to Hi-Fructose about his latest, massive works.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Ohio-born oil painter Herb Roe creates surreal scenes that are actually grounded in reality. Recent work documents the Courir de Mardi Gras, a traditional pre-Lenten bash attended by Cajun and Creole residents of his adopted home of Louisiana. In these celebrations, revelers wear costumes “drawn from medieval traditions, frontier era depictions of Native Americans and political and social commentary,” the artist says. Partially disguised, the members of these parties bring a lively and uninhibited energy to the proceedings.