by Andy SmithPosted on


Typically using marble and bronze, Lautaro Saavedra crafts beings that appear to be ripped by mythology, yet exist within the artist’s own canon. The human-animal hybrids even more approachable than classical sculpture in their size, rendered at a height as to be holdable for the viewer.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Robert Proch‘s acrylic paintings blend abstraction and the figurative, injecting an energy to scenes from the everyday. The Poland native has been able to craft his own visual language with this approach, which he takes to both the canvas and exterior walls across the world. He was last mentioned on HiFructose.com here.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Carlos Tardez has a talent for portraiture across two- and three-dimensional forms. Yet, it’s in his sculptures that the surreal nature of his works becomes visceral, whether evoking laughter, intrigue, or both. These small figures are often paired with normal-sized, found objects. These interactions create strange narratives.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Kevin Francis Gray’s malformed and surreal figures, rendered in varieties of marble and fiberglass, exhibit both a more honest, visceral reflection of humankind in their incompleteness. The Ireland-born, London-based sculptor creates work that in its seemingly soft form, defies its stubborn material. Shown both against interior and exterior backdrops, that quality plays with its surrounding environment.

by Andy SmithPosted on

The hulking sculptures of Elisabeth Higgins O’Connor don’t hide their aggregative nature, packed with wood, quilting pins, styrofoam, bedsheets, nails, foam, and other unlikely materials. The Sacramento-based artist blends mythology and contemporary commentary in the works. The artist has cited Francisco Goya as an influence in her works, as well as “the ingenuity and creativity of shanty town,” according to a KQED interview.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Cuban artist Alexi Torres crafts oil paintings that appear as though they’re woven, tethering both contemporary iconography and human subjects. In the artist’s portraits, the effect hints at the complexity of these figures; in his broader, more cultural works, the style hints at how so much of our interests and icons are tethered. His process is multi-layered, intricately taking the familiar and adding his “knitted” sensibility.