by Andy SmithPosted on

Salman Khoshroo builds figures out of electric wire, with the resulting character being made for both close inspection and movement. His reflections show the ties between the human machine and the manmade machine. And his kinetic sculptures, in particular, tell of the inherent ability for motion in both of these.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Troy Coulterman’s sculptures bring the sensibilities of comic book art to life. Though no direct narrative is assigned for the viewer, the characters and forms appear ripped straight from the pages of pulp and sci-fi tales. Coulterman was last featured on HiFructose.com here. Next month, the artist has a new show at Beinart Gallery, with the above piece included in the mix.

by Andy SmithPosted on

In recent work, Gil Bruvel carefully arranges pieces of wood, with startling faces emerging. This is just one example of the sculptor’s work, which also spans metalworking, oil painting, and several other mediums. The artist’s larger sculptures, in particular, tend to render the human head in unexpected ways.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Russian painter Andrey Remnev pulls from both centuries-old approaches and current, graphical influences. Yet, the artist says, the material he uses are decidedly classical in nature: “As painters of the past, I use natural pigments bound with egg yolk.” Remnev was last featured on HiFructose.com here.

by Andy SmithPosted on

In Michael Tole‘s paintings, such as “Diana and Actaeon: Backwards and in Stiletto Boots,” the painter recasts mythological scenes through a contemporary lens. In this effort, Tole touches on gender and other cultural issues. The artist says that wardrobe pieces in the above painting are taken from the 2018 Moschino spring/summer line.

by Andy SmithPosted on

In Jesse Mockrin‘s recent paintings, the artist quotes depictions of women and violence throughout the history of art, taking influence from Baroque work, Renaissance etchings, and other eras. In “Syrinx,” currently running at Night Gallery, the artist crops these influences and places them side by side. (Mockrin was last featured on HiFructose.com here.) The gallery says that “she first category considers images of women under duress, while the second category reclaims the condemned figure of the witch as a feminist forebear.”