by Andy SmithPosted on


The oil paintings of Dino Valls balance the bare vulnerability of his figures with surreal touches with deceptively elaborate embellishments, from the transforming compartments of his triptychs to constellation-bearing freckles. In some ways, the Spanish artist continues a thread and approach forged by European masters; elsewhere, his psychological additions feel contemporary. He was last featured on HiFructose.com here.

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Sasha Gordon‘s vivid oil paintings feature touches of the surreal, exploring themes such as mental illness and sexuality. The artist, currently a student at the Rhode Island School of Design, has moved from intimate, realistic portraits to more conceptual, perspective shifting work recently. Works such as “I Left The Night The Dummy Crashed The Gordon’s Volvo” offer seemingly personal narratives with several elements to unpack.

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Despite their expansive celestial backdrops, Tae Lee‘s acrylic paintings can feel quiet and intimate. The tethering of these otherworldly forms and figurative subjects show an artist traversing internal and spiritual topics. The artist describes his work as an “exploration of place of human consciousness in an universal causality.”

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In Tom French‘s series “Parallax Paintings,” the artist’s fractured, stark approach has stirring effects. The artist limiting his palette adds to the cerebral nature of the work, with figure and abstractions blending in elegant cacophonies. In a statement, the artist’s work is described as looking at a spectrum, rather than a single state of mind.

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Using stills from early propaganda films or frontier paintings as a basis, the layered paintings of Joshua Hagler deconstruct our history. Each work goes through several iterations, distorting and removing previous layers to arrive at something new entirely. The explorations become both visceral and introspective in this process.

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South African artist Mary Sibande explores race, history, gender, and other social themes, her visceral mixed-media figures constructed from fiberglass, cotton, resin, and other materials. She uses a sculptural representation of herself, Sophie, to also look at her own family’s generational narrative. Her practice also includes photography, integrating the themes of her sculptures and installations.