by Andy SmithPosted on

Firelei Baez blends an array of techniques and materials to explore culture and femininity. Often using the figurative form as a base, she subverts the viewers’ expectations by implementing several textures, patterns, and materials. The artist says that her massive, meticulously crafted works on paper are “intrinsically indebted to a rigorous studio practice.” Baez was last mentioned on HiFructose.com here.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Yinka Shonibare MBE blends fiberglass figures, Dutch wax-printed cotton fabric, metal, handpainted globes, and more to craft sculptures that explore race, economics, and other social issues. The artist’s mixing of textures, materials, and cultural iconography offers complexity past an initial scan. He was last featured on HiFructose.com.

by Andy SmithPosted on

The round, yet otherwise nondescript characters in Nadeem Chughati’s paintings and drawings feel the universal burdens and curiosities of any person. Whether he places them against lush landscapes or desolate, monochromatic backdrops, the vagueness of his figures remain. This changes the typical point of entry for figurative works. “I feel that people are very similar in many ways, so expressing my feelings can often strike a chord with those who relate to the situations that I put my characters in,” the artist said, in a past statement.

by Andy SmithPosted on


The sculptures of Yoshitoshi Kanemaki bend and distort the human form. Often using the repetition of facial features as a means to explore the endless emotions contained within a subject, his use of wood adds a complexity to both the texture of his figures and the skill required. The artist was featured in Hi-Fructose Vol. 38 and he last appeared on HiFructose.com here.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Artist Beth Cavener’s stoneware sculptures present creatures from the natural world in eerie, new lights. A new show at Jason Jacques Gallery in New York City collects new pieces from the artist. “The Other” presents works from the sculptor of several moods and approaches. Five “new major works” are presented in the show. Cavener was last featured on HiFructose.com here, and she was part of the Turn the Page: The First 10 Years of Hi-Fructose exhibition.

by Andy SmithPosted on

South Korean illustrator Jo In Hyuk crafts delicate, stunning illustrations with a dash of drama injected into each figure. The artist’s deceptively simple studies use soft colors and irregular angles to push the intimacy. And though sparse, the intended emotion behind the works can be mystifying.