by Andy SmithPosted on

In Jillian Denby’s voyeuristic, yet expansive paintings, people engage in both everyday activity as well as the unexpected. When viewed as a whole, her scenes offer a connectedness between its parties that each likely couldn’t see themselves. With works like “Genius of the River Chases Away The Frenzy of Art,” the reality of what’s human and what’s art itself is blurred. “Nature can be overwhelming and landscape a little removed. With that in mind and viewing it directly, I try to acknowledge its presence, while conceptualizing a fragile observational dialogue,” the artist has said.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Isaac Cordal brings new sculptures to C.O.A. Galerie in Montreal with “Ego Monuments,” his distinctive everyman showing the solitude of contemporary living. Alongside his balding figures is a depicting of the U.S.’s embattled leader in “Game of Thrones” and human-faced livestock grazing an urban puddle. The show runs through Oct. 12. (Cordal was last featured on our site here.)

by Andy SmithPosted on

Sculptor Cristina Córdova’s absorbing and intimate figures inhabit a new show in Hodges Taylor in Charlotte. “CRISTINA CÓRDOVA: cuerpo exquisito” offers works with personal notes for the artist, whether in the pieces modeled after her daughters or the nods to her Puerto Rican heritage. She was last featured on our site here. (Photographs in this post were taken by Lydia Bittner-Baird.)

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The samurai’s enormous impact in Japan was even felt in fashion, and in Tetsuya Noguchi’s sculptures and paintings, contemporary fashion influences their own garb. “This Is Not a Samurai” is the artist’s new show at Arsham/Fieg Gallery in Kith Soho. The micro-gallery in New York City has garnered praise for giving smaller works attention. The show kicks off today at the small space.

by Andy SmithPosted on

The sculptures of Federico Clapis often play with our tether to technology, from the womb to the modern professional. The former stage, in particular, is where we find some of the artist’s most provocative work. He recently unveiled the above piece, a massive bronze figure, in London.

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Alvin Ong’s oil paintings, depicting decadence and nondiscriminatory consumption, crackle with energy. These works, following a tradition in art history of examining these themes, move between eroticism and aggression. The Singaporean artist offered this most recent body of work as “Supper Club” earlier this year.