by Andy SmithPosted on

Matthew Stone creates surreal, figurativeworks that are a combination of digital printing and acrylic on linen. The London-based artist, part of the art collective !WOWOW!, has worked in painting, photography, sculpting, performance art, writing, and other endeavors. “Healing With Wounds,” a newer body of work, is said to be “showing diverse bodies at play and in conflict.” He was last mentioned on HiFructose.com here.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Molly Gruninger’s work may appear to be digitally created, but these pieces are actually oil on canvas. The Los Angeles-based artist uses her multi-disciplinary talents to craft figures that are both ornate and elegantly simple in how they’re framed in each work.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Ken Flewellyn, a California-based artist, creates intimate clashes of culture in his oil paintings. Mostly depicting anonymous women in his works, his figures “challenge our assumptions about identity and cultural homogeneity.” The works are packed with hip-hop references and flourishes of historical Japanese culture.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Human artifacts and animals fill the subdued oil paintings of Miguel Escobar. And though many works appear without actual people, the artist is often exploring humanity through these desolate, beast-filled scenes.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Whether it’s on a canvas or an urban wall, Drew Merritt crafts harrowing portraits that are both intimate and elusive, utilizing nondescript backdrops. As vague as some of Merritt’s narratives may seem, each carries an earnest humanity. The artist was last featured on HiFructose.com here, and according to a statement, “has resolved to defy categorization.”

by Andy SmithPosted on

Japanese artist Tomohiro Inaba creates sculptures that appear to disintegrate into the air. His steel wire animals and human figures appear as apparitions in the galleries they inhabit across the world. For Inaba, the imagined space created by his works are a vital component.