by Andy SmithPosted on

Daiva Kairevičiūtė, an artist from Lithuania, crafts drawings that reflect on femininity— through the various stages of life and shades of identity. Her figures, often rendered in black, contrast with the pops of floral hues or creatures that inhabit her works.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Simphiwe Ndzube’s startling mixture of sculpture, painting, and installation both transport us to new worlds and examine our own mythologies. Recent pieces, blending, resin, spraypaint, collage, and found objects, feature figures that appear to emerge from traditional confines inside galleries.

by Andy SmithPosted on

In his depictions of the everyday, Arcmanoro Niles recalls traditional figurative painting while subverting in his choice of hues and glitter—and also introducing strange characters into the scenes dubbed “seekers.” These characters offer new insight and disruption to the people he pulls from his own life.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Anna Weyant’s stirring paintings offer both autobiographical imagery and universal examinations of life’s stages. Recent shows, like “Welcome to the Dollhouse” at 56 HENRY, are contemplative and elegant in execution. That show, in particular, was a showcase of the artist’s cinematic sensibility.

by Andy SmithPosted on

In Jillian Denby’s voyeuristic, yet expansive paintings, people engage in both everyday activity as well as the unexpected. When viewed as a whole, her scenes offer a connectedness between its parties that each likely couldn’t see themselves. With works like “Genius of the River Chases Away The Frenzy of Art,” the reality of what’s human and what’s art itself is blurred. “Nature can be overwhelming and landscape a little removed. With that in mind and viewing it directly, I try to acknowledge its presence, while conceptualizing a fragile observational dialogue,” the artist has said.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Isaac Cordal brings new sculptures to C.O.A. Galerie in Montreal with “Ego Monuments,” his distinctive everyman showing the solitude of contemporary living. Alongside his balding figures is a depicting of the U.S.’s embattled leader in “Game of Thrones” and human-faced livestock grazing an urban puddle. The show runs through Oct. 12. (Cordal was last featured on our site here.)