by Andy SmithPosted on

Sergio Martinez’s oil paintings teem with movement, athleticism, and drama. The artist, born in Chile in the the mid-1960s, works in “descriptive realism.” The result of his gravitation toward cabaret and circus life translates to work full of danger and grace. A biography offers insights on Sergio’s current path.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Hsu Tung Han’s wooden sculptures carry embellishments that resemble digital distortion. His “pixelated” figures weave contemporary and age-old artistic sensibilities. The Taiwanese artist stacks blocks of wood, whether it’s Walnut or African wax wood, and then crafts those pieces into surreal creations.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Jenny Morgan’s honed blend of abstraction and realistic portraiture unlocks new paths to the personalities she paints. In a new survey of the past decade of her work, viewers can see how that sensibility evolved—and how she approaches giving the portrait treatment to celebrities, when commissioned by national publications. The Museum of Contemporary Art Denver hosts this exhibition, which runs through Aug. 27. Morgan created the cover for Hi-Fructose Vol. 39, and she was last featured on HiFructose.com here.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Nadezda’s haunting oil paintings are studies in both order and chaos, as the artist’s fluid renderings blend intricate and abstract embellishments. A new show at Haven Gallery in Long Island, titled “Fly-By-Night,” meditates on femininity in this style. The show starts June 1 and lasts through June 18.

by Andy SmithPosted on

English painter Mary Jane Ansell creates work that both subverts gender roles and pays homage to the history of portraiture. In a new show at Corey Helford Gallery in Los Angeles, “Of Dreams, Birds and Bones,” she offers a series of paintings that evolves these ideas. The show kicks of June 10 and lasts through July 8. Ansell was last featured on HiFructose.com here.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Andi Soto, a Panama-based artist, uses ink, graphite, prismacolor pencils, gel pens, and other materials to create her intricate figures, often bare and seemingly vulnerable. Soto often removes flesh and other elements while adorning her female characters with head-dressings. Yet, the parts that remain are rendered in absorbing and detailed linework. In the past, the artist has described her style as “knitting with ink.”