by Andy SmithPosted on


Gosia, a Poland-born, Toronto-based sculptor, creates feminine figures with touches of the surreal, whether reflecting the natural world or expressions that extend from inside of the characters themselves. Each of these sculptures contain both elegance and emotional complexity, often containing a new sense of drama at each angle. The artist was featured in Hi-Fructose Vol. 41, and she was last mentioned on HiFructose.com here.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Australian-Spanish artist Tom “Dilly” Littleson works as an illustrator and graphic designer in Melbourne. Littleson’s realistic pencil drawings are found in various publications across the world. These illustrations have wide-ranging subjects, yet the artist’s personal work most commonly seems to contain a visceral, sometimes gruesome quality contained within single characters. As unsettling as these tend to be, the subjects themselves don’t seem to be bothered by the mayhem.

by Andy SmithPosted on


Van Arno’s latest series, “Upright,” represents yet another evolution for the painter, who has worked professionally for two decades and taught for five years. Arno was last featured on HiFructose.com here.

by Andy SmithPosted on

British sculptor Sir Antony Gormley explores the relationships between our bodies and the world around us—and even our place in the universe. Through his work, whether in traditional settings, installations, or in public artwork, the artist focuses on the human form with varying approaches. Towering figures like “Exposure” are hunched over in contemplation in the Netherlands. Or in more controlled environments, like galleries across the world, lifesize figures like those depicted in “Domain Field” are scattered across the space.

by Andy SmithPosted on


Roos Van Der Vliet, a painter from the Netherlands, crafts acrylic works in which women stare through the confines of their hair. In each of the paintings in her “Storytellers” body of work, feminine faces are imprisoned in strands of varying, entangled designs, as striking gazes peer through. While other artists, like Winnie Truong, use a fascination with hair to create different moods, Van Der Vliet explores “anonymity and alienation” with her female subjects.

by Andy SmithPosted on


Effie Pryer, a Tasmania-based artist, crafts paintings that mix various mythologies from across the world with what she considers to be a distinctly Tasmanian perspective. She describes this viewpoint as “an eccentric combination of narratives reflecting our uniquely jumbled cultural perspective.” In a recent show titled “Something Borrowed” at Colville Gallery, she relates these stories through the faces of younger, modern models.