by Andy SmithPosted on

The “live sculptures” of Roman Ermakov combine fashion, fine art, and installation work, each offering an energy and vibrancy powered by the humans bearing his works. These creations from the Moscow-based artist enliven both the runaway and public spaces. His recent work, as shown, takes influence from the costume parties of Germany’s Bauhaus school in the 1920s, where these artists’ radical ideas in architecture and sculpture were also channeled.

by CaroPosted on

He rose to fame as a fabulous illusionist of rock – ever changing, always outrageous and more bizarre by the moment. David Bowie made art out of life, from his music to his clothes, and he was a champion of fashion designers both world famous and relatively unknown. Fashion shaped the style chameleon’s belief in the importance of clothes to a performance. One of his most prolific collaborators was Kansai Yamamoto, whose designs are part of the traveling exhibition, ‘David Bowie is’, now on its last stop at the Brooklyn Museum in New York.

by Andy SmithPosted on


Artist and performer Sasha Frolova is known for crafting synthetic experience, teeming with color and pop. Inside France’s Etretat Gardens, she recently staged an ode to Marie Antoinette (and her love of oysters) with her signature, inflatable fashion pieces, such as towering, faux hairdos, form-fitting suits, and in this case, a “a inflatable “boudoir-trampoline.” (Frolova is featured in the upcoming Hi-Fructose: New Contemporary Fashion, which you can read more about here.)

by Andy SmithPosted on

Dutch designer Iris van Herpen creates apparel that can appear both organic or frozen in movement, whether her fashion art emulates a splash of water or writhing, tentacle-like forms. Herpen’s versatility in shown in how her pieces seemed ripped out of varying eras.

by Andy SmithPosted on


Kostiantyn Rybak, the designer behind the brand Kofta, has said that he likes to create “between art and wearable fashion things.” His “Imago” line takes notes from the natural world, with seemingly organic backpacks that recall the shapes, forms, and living things found in rainforests. The Kiev-based designer has adapted accessories reminiscent of architecture and machines in the past, yet this direction creates something that defies its manmade origins.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Turkish-American designer Eda Yorulmazoğlu crafts wild costumes, with both distinct body of works and individual creatures as part of her repertoire. Part-fashion designer, part-textile artist, she navigates several spheres, all carrying an absurdism and vibrancy bolstered by bringing them out into the public.