by Andy SmithPosted on


Blending horror, humor, and fantasy, Peter Ferguson shows new work in a show at Roq La Rue titled “Mock Robin.” Running Nov. 2 through Nov. 28, the show places monsters, strange machines, and other strange elements in scenes that traverse history. The venue says his work recalls “Dutch Renaissance painting, old National Geographic photography, and 18th century British Naval history.” Ferguson was last featured on HiFructose.com here.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Redd Walitzki‘s fantastical paintings offers a vision of people fully engrossed into the natural world, with magical implications. In a show at Haven Gallery, “The Midsommar Dream,” the artist calls upon ancient folktales and dreamlike visions. Walitzki was last mentioned on HiFructose.com here.

by Andy SmithPosted on

David Jien’s recent work blends both futuristic and fantastical visions, with the artist’s usual eye for detail. While his creatures may recall sci-fi storybooks, there’s humorous and disconcerting notes hidden in the corners.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Serbian artist Davor Gromilovic draws and paints fantastical scenes, mixing influences and moods with both a sense of wonder and danger. He’s able to navigate all eras with an absorbing sense of detail, featuring Cro-Magnon characters and futuristic swashbucklers. All have a tinge of humor within kinetic, theatrical displays.

by CaroPosted on

Australian artist Rodrigo Luff‘s paintings of women in luminous realms take us back to a more innocent time before Eve bit into the forbidden apple. Previously featured here on our blog, the Sydney based artist finds his inspiration in an array of artists, science and nature, from the electric colors of the Northern Lights to fantastical worlds created by Japanese animator Hayao Miyazaki. Luff’s goddess-like characters are not visitors into this magical place, but feel right at home among flocks of owls, deer and other creatures of the forest. “I’m interested in the way we have always sought a connection to the natural world, and how that liminal, mysterious and wild realm reflects those uncharted dimensions within our psyche,” he says.

by CaroPosted on

Jakub Rozalski (aka “Mr. Werewolf”) is a Polish concept artist and illustrator who describes the world in his paintings as a futuristic 1920s Eastern Europe, or “1920+”. Previously featured on our blog, Rozalski’s works contrast the soft nostalgia of 19th and 20th century inspired scenery under attack against giant mecha robots. While warring nations combat mechanical beasts in epic battles that feel alien and also vaguely familiar, Polish shepards and farmers in the countryside work their land alongside wild animals. “I like to mix historical facts and situations with my own motives, ideas and visions,” he says, “I attach great importance to the details, the equipment, the costumes, because it allows you to embed painting within a specified period of time.”