by CaroPosted on

Having just come off their exhibition at Thinkspace Gallery in Los Angeles (covered here), Polish street art duo Sainer and Bezt, known as Etam Cru, recently completed their second major mural in the United States. Co-produced by Thinkspace and Branded Arts, their wall “Mr. Rooster” is a massive portrait of a young country boy with a rooster standing on his shoulders as he looks over the smoggy city of Los Angeles.

by Abby Lynn KlinkenbergPosted on

Known for their imaginative and expansive urban murals, Polish street art duo Etam Cru (HF Vol. 32), made up of individual artists Sainer and Bezt, has crossed over into the exhibition scene. Usually working together on blank walls as tall as ten stories with cherry pickers, scaffolding, and paint-rollers, the works currently on display at Thinkspace Gallery in Los Angeles are smaller but no less ambitious; on their own canvases, Sainer and Bezt reveal the nuances of their own styles that blend together so seamlessly in their murals. While the artists themselves have noted that Sainer’s style is more photo-realistic while Bezt focuses on the cartoonish, “graffiti” aspects of their collaborations, both artists cross over into the other’s territory with ease and skill in their exhibition “Galimatias”.

by Sasha BogojevPosted on

September 11 through 13, London hosted the MyFinBec pop-up show, introducing a unique project that merged urban art and wine making. After their initial show at the Cave Fin Bec winery in Sion, Switzerland, and Cologne, Germany, the exhibition was presented at LimeWharf to London’s local art and wine lovers. Once a year, this winery commissions well-established and emerging artists to create labels for their limited edition organic wines through the MyFineBec project. For 2014, the winery introduced a line-up of internationally-recognized artists: Vhils from Portugal, Herakut from Germany, C215 from France and Etam Cru (featured in our current issue, Hi-Fructose Vol. 32) from Poland. The artists were invited to create mural-like works on stacks of wine cases that were later available for sale.