by Andy SmithPosted on

The lifesized crocheted and knitted figures made by Finland artist Liisa Hietanen are based off of people in her hometown. The artist gets to know them during the process of creating their likeness. When the artist is done with one of her “Villager” sculptures, she takes it to the public and displays them in Hämeenkyrö.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Maryam Ashkanian’s stirring “Sleep” series offers embroidered figures on pillows, with threads creating a sculptural landscape on each canvas. The works carry both an intimacy and are part of a broader practice that implements textiles and painting into unexpected forms. The fiber artist is currently based in Iran, where she operates her studio.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Sophia Narrett’s painterly approach to embroidery results in elaborate, startling scenes. Her themes traverse escapism, psychology, and sexuality. Each section of the work brings its own surprising sharpness, with a certain visceral quality resulting from the material.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Yoon Ji Seon‘s embroidered portraits blend fiber and photography. Much of work consists of self-portraits, with varying degrees of emotions, abstraction, and detail. Her “Rag Face” series goes back to 2006, when she started experimenting with these mixed-media pieces.

by Andy SmithPosted on


The embroidered monsters of Tracy Widdess add an unexpected texture to the horror genre. The Vancouver artist has called her practice “brutal knitting.” And with her talents in crafting textile fright, she embodies that label with both wearable and standalone pieces.

by Andy SmithPosted on

In the series “Ça va aller,” photographer Joana Choumali adds embroidery to images captured of her African hometown, Abidjan, in the days after the March 2016 Grand-Bassam terrorist attack that took 19 lives and injured 33. She began embroidering as a way to cope, with the series evolving from this approach. The artist observed a melancholic population following the event.