by Andy SmithPosted on

Scott M. Fischer is widely known for his illustrative works, whether it’s comic book covers, kids’ books, concept design, or game art. Yet his fine art practice, free from the confines of depicting set characters or situations, offers a different look at the artist. His hyperdetailed, dreamlike works recall both classical influences and a contemporary edge, while blending digital and traditional tools.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Artist John Mahoney crafts strange, futuristic illustrations that are marked by absorbing detail and shifting perspectives. He’s also had a hand in products from Lucasfilm, Disney, Blizzard, Hasbro Cartoon Network, and Miramax in various roles under visual development and conceptual art. Yet, perhaps his most personal project is “Zentropa,” a graphic novel “30 years in the making” that features no word bubbles and serves as a stream-of-conscious, unpredictable narrative.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Felicia Chiao, a self-described “industrial designer by day and illustrator by night,” crafts drawings of humorous and fantastical scenes, packed with vibrant details. Her signature bald, naked protagonist seems to be a stand-in for all of us, taking in the wonder or other range of emotions in each piece.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Nomi Chi, a Vancouver-based illustrator and tattoo artist, creates mysterious, sometimes playful images that often explore identity. Whether it’s on paper, sculptural, or in mural form, these strange characters mix the absorbing and the unsettling. Though accomplished in both tattooing and illustration, the latter carries more personal themes for the artist.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Andi Soto, a Panama-based artist, uses ink, graphite, prismacolor pencils, gel pens, and other materials to create her intricate figures, often bare and seemingly vulnerable. Soto often removes flesh and other elements while adorning her female characters with head-dressings. Yet, the parts that remain are rendered in absorbing and detailed linework. In the past, the artist has described her style as “knitting with ink.”

by Andy SmithPosted on


Jenna Andersen, an artist/illustrator based in Williamsburg, Va., creates immersive, hyperdetailed scenes, often with surreal overtones. The artist often injects only pops of color into her personal work, rendering natural backdrops in intricate linework, with her animal and human subjects as the pieces’ points of entry. In other works, these typically monochromatic settings are given lush, gouache hues.