by Andy SmithPosted on

Felix Dolah uses diluted charcoal to craft his minimalist, ghostly drawings. These figures, often gangly and dilapidated, come in sparse singular or as heaps of crowded, writhing characters. Elsewhere, he applies the same material to photographs, adding grim accents to archival images. He’s said that although early in life, he drew knights and monsters, “now I draw more monsters than knights.”

by Andy SmithPosted on

Baptiste Hersoc’s drawings and paintings merge unlikely objects and organic parts, with both humorous and ghastly results. The artist has both illustration and fine art practices, with book contributions, magazine projects, and regular collaborations. His “Introspection” series uses the human body as its theme.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Using just a pencil and paper, Nicola Alessandrini crafts striking, surreal imagery that explore the subconscious. The Italy-born artist creates scenes in which intimate figures are unraveled, producing strange growths and stripped of their normal defenses. Gender and sexuality also often play a role in Alessandrini’s works, as well as totems from childhood.

by Andy SmithPosted on

In Mario Maplé’s ballpoint pen drawings, the artist moves between conventional beauty and the grotesque. The works are deceptively complex in their elegance, the soft lines of the subject the result of tedious work in ink pen. The artist will also occasionally mix in watercolors to emphasize his distortions.

by Andy SmithPosted on


Austrian artist David Leitner’s stirring work takes him across the world, whether it’s in murals, illustrations, or stirring drawings that react to his surroundings. In his black, graphical line drawings, the artist’s cascading figures make use of neighboring contours and abstractions.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Neva Hosking to craft biographical drawings on scraps and unexpected surfaces is rooted in a time long before having her formal training, yet that practice has endured. This approach “built an understanding that a broken and fractured viewpoint often presents a more accurate and multi-faceted view of whatever subject needs to be explored,” she says. The result shows a prism that represents a complex, ever-changing humanity.