by Andy SmithPosted on

Though undetectable from afar, Bryan Valenzuela‘s drawn forms are actually crafted from thousands of small letters and words. These collections of words are a script tailored to each work, whether on the page or adorning a public wall. The artist also works in textiles, acrylic paint, and collage into his practice.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Randy Ortiz’s stirring drawings adorn gallery walls and album covers, each showing the artist’s knack for horror and surrealism. Works such as “Rejoice, for Tonight It Is a World That We Bury” (below) offer disconcerting narratives in progress, rendered in graphite.

by Andy SmithPosted on


In Stuart Holland‘s charcoal drawings, reality is questioned through massive architecture and solitary figures. There’s both a cerebral and magical quality to these scenes, vague in its ties to actual reality. The gray values in his drawings, whether rendering abstract or geometric forms, add to their psychological nature.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Miles Johnston‘s surreal drawings bring elegance and distortion to our natural forms. The artist is contributing to the upcoming “Hi-Fructose Presents: The Art of The Mushroom” group show at the Compound Gallery in October, and in this post, takes us through the process of creating his work in the show. (He was also featured in Hi-Fructose Vol. 45)

by Andy SmithPosted on

Vladislav Skobelskij, who works under the moniker Happy, creates voluminous, candy-colored scenes and animations. The delightfully garish works move between disturbing and alluring, each figure overcome by vibrant and cartoonish outgrowths. Happy often injects pop cultural and photographic elements into this fantasy world.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Edward Kinsella III has a knack for crafting monsters. Using just a few hues and strokes, the St. Louis artist creates haunting portraits and illustrations that are seemingly simple, yet wholly cerebral. Though young, the artist has forged his career in both gallery shows and a teaching practice.