by Andy SmithPosted on


Scott Tulay is an artist and architect based in Amherst, Mass., crafting ghostly drawings that play with light, shadow, and a distorted version of familiar structures. Tulay’s command of space and design bring an engrossing order to his otherwise otherworldly creations. And whether it’s ink, charcoal, pastel, graphite, or a combination of all, his drawings offer vibrant arrangements that loom like vivid apparitions.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Australian artist Lucy Hardie’s pen and ink creations are crafted with a fine stippling technique, resulting in enchanting and surreal scenes. Mostly self-taught, the Melbourne-based artist cites H.J. Ford, Matthias Grunewald, Ivan Bilibin, and the Old Masters as influences. Hardie was last mentioned on HiFructose.com here.

by Andy SmithPosted on


The faces of subjects in Björn Griesbach’s “Hollow Children” are smudged in graphite on mylar, save for the wide grins rendered ominous in the process. The German illustator, based Hannover, has a knack for evoking specific moods with pops of colors and detailed renderings, but this series offers a simpler, bleak approach. Griesbach was last featured on HiFructose.com here.

by Margot BuermannPosted on


“Ouroboros” by Lana Crooks

In All that Remains, the new exhibition at Stranger Factory, a diverse group of artists offer their own interpretations of the phrase, “What remains when all is said and done?” Curated by Lana Crooks (who also appears in the exhibition), the group show runs October 7-31, 2016. Participating artists include Adipocere, Jeremy Bastian, Jessica Dalva, Kristina Drake, Matt Hall, Stephanie Inagaki, Darla Jackson, Jessica Joslin, Jennifer Joslin, Mahlimae, Lauren Marx, Caitlin McCormick, Stephanie Metz, Christina Mrozik, Forest Rogers, Virginie Ropars, Sinan Soykut, Tyler Thrasher, Jake Waldron, and Katherine Walsh (FearsomeBeast). View more photos from All that Remains behind the cut.

by Margot BuermannPosted on


Italian artist Vesod exhibits a new collection of paintings and drawings in E-horizon, opening today at Mirus Gallery in San Francisco. Viewers will be treated to eight works on canvas and paper, as well as a site-specific installation. Vesod is recognized for his perception-altering creations that offer the illusion of three-dimensionality. He often depicts human figures traversing through geometric environments, which are reflective of the “eternal present”. The exhibition is on view through October 29.

by Margot BuermannPosted on

Julie Speed is an American artist known for her meticulous and startling contemporary works. Her paintings, etchings and collages present bizarre imagery that is rife with absurdity, violence and anxiety, and have been described as both disturbing and beautiful. Though constantly labeled a “Neo Surrealist”, Speed describes herself as a “Pararealist”, offering a glimpse into a world that exists parallel to our own reality.