by Andy SmithPosted on


Oscar Oiwa’s latest 360-degree drawing, “Paradise,” is hosted in Japan House in São Paulo. The Brazil-born artist is known for both his immersive installations and his canvas pieces, with the artist’s work on display at the space until June 3. The artist used 120 marker pens inside of an inflatable dome to create the new work.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Ozabu only uses pencil and graphite in her startling figurative works on paper, using elegant linework and subtle iconography in mysterious minimalist pieces. The Japanese artist is self-taught, and the artist’s long fascination with birds comes through in how figures are accompanied by and are overtaken by winged creatures.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Johan Van Mullem‘s ghostly drawings take shape and dissipate across the page, often taking the form of weathered faces and muscular appendages. The artist is known for his dramatic paintings, yet even in the form of pencil, pen, and charcoal, the supernatural aspect of Van Mullem’s practice comes through.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Artist Bruno Novelli excels in both color and blending patterns, and in his “Night in the Tropics” series, the latter is highlighted. His Indian ink works were inspired by an experience of the artist in the Amazon. Bruno Novelli Novelli last appeared on HiFructose.com here.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Eva Redamonti’s dynamic, hyperdetailed drawings blend futurism and fantasy, her works often packed with tension and movement. Part of that tension can also be found in her approach, as she uses both India Ink on paper and digital coloring methods. Her work often moves between human and machine—with absorbing transitions.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Giovanni Forlino’s vibrant paintings and drawings move between dreamlike scenes, grotesque characters, and wild creatures of the natural world. His surreal, monstrous subjects, in particular, fill the space as if they are on the cusp of breaking out of it.