by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Adonna Khare creates mural-scale pencil drawings inspired by the animal world. Anthropomorphized animals interact in mysterious forests shrouded in plants and overhanging branches. Khare’s work evokes Aesop’s Fables with its storybook-like narratives. While her drawings might appear allegorical, they are also open-ended and surreal. The artist won the 2012 Art Prize competition and has work in the permanent collections of the Long Beach Museum of Art and the Grand Rapids Art Museum.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

With a new piece dated every few days between November 2014 and January 2015, Mike Giant’s latest series of drawings serves as a map of the current state of the artist’s life. Though Giant is originally from New Mexico, his name is synonymous with the San Francisco graffiti and tattoo scenes, where he developed himself as an artist in the 1990s and 2000s. With rapid gentrification squeezing out many of San Francisco’s creative enclaves, Giant relocated to Boulder, Colorado two years ago. His upcoming solo show, “Colorado,” opens at FFDG in San Francisco on February 13, meditates on various transitions in Giant’s life — his move halfway across the country, the end of a relationship, and various shifts in his lifestyle choices.

by CaroPosted on

Washington, DC. based artist Ashley Oubré creates compelling photoreal images with just carbon pencil, graphite and india ink. Her drawings capture private moments of shame and humiliation from insecurities that many of us face. As someone who once fought depression, she’s set out to embrace what society considers abnormal; obesity, stretch marks, age spots, and twisted spines. These are the characteristics that connect her subjects.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

The way we express ourselves intimately with our partners in real life seldom resembles the glamorous heaving and sighing of movie sex scenes. Italian artist Riccardo Mannelli eschews these cinematic cliches when he conveys personal moments between couples. In his ongoing series of works on paper, Mannelli’s approach to erotica feels natural and unpretentious. The bodies he focuses on are not idealized by any means: He honestly depicts his subjects’ aging physiques, tattoos, and body hair. By embracing these so-called imperfections, Mannelli celebrates their beauty.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on


Jim Dingilian’s work comes in the form of a message in a bottle, which he draws with the tip of candle on the glass’s surface. The result is a smokey image nestled within the bottle’s concave shape. Dingilian uses his unconventional medium in a way that evokes India ink, impressively handling the flame like a brush. His scenes are well-defined and highly detailed. Dingilian has fun with layering opaque and translucent layers of smoke, resulting in complex scenes within each vessel.

by CaroPosted on

Greg Eason has created thought provoking new images for his upcoming exhibition “CLASSIC/ LUXURY / EXOTIC / ROMANCE (C/L/E/R)” at Space W10 in London, opening January 15th. He will show alongside Bristol-based artist Anouk Mercier, where together they mix-up references of the past and future. Eason’s drawings are heavy with an empty vastness as in previous works, covered here. His use of negative space to depict Romantic subjects have merged with the exoctic. Replacing the eggs and skulls is the statue of Winged Victory of Samothrace, combined with jumping dolphins and Scarlet Macaws, stripped of their brilliance by a monochromatic palette.