by CaroPosted on

Eric Green’s meticulously detailed drawings replicate life beautifully- but there is something off about them. “When you really begin to understand life, everything changes completely all the time. Nothing is ever the same again,” he says. Working primarily in colored pencil, Green draws images that are meant to change our perceptions by illustrating the subtleties between moments as light changes and objects are mysteriously moved by unseen occupants.

by CaroPosted on

In Joel Daniel Phillips’ art, featured here, the characters living in his neighborhood are brought to the center stage and become the hero of their own story. The San Francisco based artist’s graphite and charcoal drawings feature people on the streets who generally go unnoticed by the public, or are virtually ignored, only to become celebrated in his monumental works. “A true portrait is far more than a rendering of physical form,” he says, focusing instead on portraying the vulnerable nature that makes us human.

by CaroPosted on

Oregon based artist Morgan Rosskopf describes herself as a “visual hunter-gatherer”. In other words, her surreal, carnal works are mostly driven by her own intuitions. Her illustrations on paper combine hand-drawn elements and collage to create lush clusters of personal imagery: a messy, knotted assemblage of fragments, from the sweet and savory to bodily and grotesque. “Hunting and gathering images is both subject and method,” she explains. “I believe that all my images already exist; I just have to find them and rearrange them.”

by CaroPosted on

Inyoung Seoung’s work draws parallels between humankind and nature. She considers people to be in a perpetual state of growth, reaching up and moving forward like trees to light. The Korea-born, Southern California-based artist one day found herself admiring her own backyard, where she was impressed by the fact that no two trees were alike, and that they contain an infinite supply of design that she emulates in her drawings and installations.

by CaroPosted on

Taiwanese artist Hui Chi Lee presents a peculiar image of the human figure. She crowds her drawings with masses of bodies lumped together and entangled in threads and strands of human hair. Full of energy, her images explore themes relating to materialism, human behaviors, and relationships in today’s society, made all the more dynamic when implemented in a larger than life scale. Working mainly in pen, graphite and colored pencil on paper, her choice to use non-traditional painting materials ties with her goal as an artist: simply to create imagery that will inspire a curiosity about the implications of her work.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Su-Jeong Nam’s work, in a sense, mirrors the biological processes of her subjects. She begins with the base of color, applied with dry pigments. And then, line by line, vivid portraits of the natural world are grown. Nam says her detailed images are grounded in the familiar, yet highlight “an aspect invisible to most people, through the language of my own artistic process.” The result is metaphysical, a study of the harmony between the natural world and a broader understanding of the universe.