by Andy SmithPosted on

In the recent illustrations of Elif Varol Ergen, the artist dives further into the mystical with her feminine heroes and creatures, her own myths and contemporary lessons emerging. Since she was last featured on HiFructose.com (here), she released her first print publication, “A Sequence of Witches,” through Von Zos. The artist was also featured in Hi-Fructose Vol. 19.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Matt Furie, the artist and illustrator known for crafting (and killing) the frog character Pepe, brings his humorous and vibrant sensibilities to Nucleus Portland in a show currently running at the gallery. “Tuff Crowd” offers both crowd scenes and single portraits, all packed with Furie characters.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Ryan Travis Christian’s small-scale graphite drawings are the latest to occupy Arsham/Fieg Gallery, the minature gallery inside KITH in New York City. The artist crafts daily meditations that are influenced by vintage, handdrawn animation and contemporary issues. The 7”-by-10” works are shown at the space through April 2.

by Andy SmithPosted on

The lifesized, realistic portraits crafted by Joel Daniel Phillips currently inhabit the Fort Wayne Museum of Art in the new exhibition “Charcoal Testament.” With pencil and charcoal, the artist’s subjects have moved between the impoverished and the reality and the aftermath of nuclear testing near the Western coast.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Jim Woodring’s recent drawings include the above pen-and-ink scene, a 5-foot-wide and 3-foot-tall work depicting what the artists calls “an open-air emergency room under the full moon.” The work took nine months to complete. The revered illustrator was featured way back in Hi-Fructose Vol. 3, a feature that was later part of Hi-Fructose Collected – Volume 1.

by Andy SmithPosted on

In the personal work of illustrator Andrew Fairclough, the artist’s cerebral explorations are infused with comic and pop influences. Stylistically, his work has a kinship with the drawings of Charles Burns or other Lowbrow luminaries, while also showing Fairclough’s love of vintage spot illustrations, retro science fiction, and “the textural wonders of degraded print.”