by CaroPosted on

Inyoung Seoung’s work draws parallels between humankind and nature. She considers people to be in a perpetual state of growth, reaching up and moving forward like trees to light. The Korea-born, Southern California-based artist one day found herself admiring her own backyard, where she was impressed by the fact that no two trees were alike, and that they contain an infinite supply of design that she emulates in her drawings and installations.

by CaroPosted on

Taiwanese artist Hui Chi Lee presents a peculiar image of the human figure. She crowds her drawings with masses of bodies lumped together and entangled in threads and strands of human hair. Full of energy, her images explore themes relating to materialism, human behaviors, and relationships in today’s society, made all the more dynamic when implemented in a larger than life scale. Working mainly in pen, graphite and colored pencil on paper, her choice to use non-traditional painting materials ties with her goal as an artist: simply to create imagery that will inspire a curiosity about the implications of her work.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Su-Jeong Nam’s work, in a sense, mirrors the biological processes of her subjects. She begins with the base of color, applied with dry pigments. And then, line by line, vivid portraits of the natural world are grown. Nam says her detailed images are grounded in the familiar, yet highlight “an aspect invisible to most people, through the language of my own artistic process.” The result is metaphysical, a study of the harmony between the natural world and a broader understanding of the universe.

by CaroPosted on

Mexican born artist Laura Lucía Ferrer Zamudio, better known as “Kikyz 1313”, takes grotesque and uncomfortable subjects and turns them into something exquisite. First featured on our blog here, Kikyz 1313’s macabre drawings often depict children in a state of decay and rot, where their bodies and faces are dissected to a disturbingly beautiful extreme. “Why do we ignore the very intimate contents of our own bodies?” It is a question that the artist consistently contemplates as she creates her art.

by CaroPosted on

If you asked Korean artist Yeom Jihee to describe her art in one word, it would be “hysteria”. Her monochromatic mixed media drawings feature a disorderly assemblage of figures and impossible objects, set in environments where the physical plane extends into a blank space of nothingness. Jihee uses these explorations of infinity, reflection, symmetry, and perspective to express her feelings of emotional conflict, or in her words, “a loss of self-control due to overwhelming fear.”

by Abby Lynn KlinkenbergPosted on

Creating minimalistic sculptures out of wooden sticks and hot glue, Polish artist Janusz Grünspek’s series “Drawings in Space” reduces everyday objects to their most simplified states: their outlines. He makes use of negative space to suggest a transparency where opacity is expected- each of his creations is life-sized and Grünspek’s precision tempts the viewer to use them as if they were the real things.