by Margot BuermannPosted on


Italian artist Vesod exhibits a new collection of paintings and drawings in E-horizon, opening today at Mirus Gallery in San Francisco. Viewers will be treated to eight works on canvas and paper, as well as a site-specific installation. Vesod is recognized for his perception-altering creations that offer the illusion of three-dimensionality. He often depicts human figures traversing through geometric environments, which are reflective of the “eternal present”. The exhibition is on view through October 29.

by Margot BuermannPosted on

Julie Speed is an American artist known for her meticulous and startling contemporary works. Her paintings, etchings and collages present bizarre imagery that is rife with absurdity, violence and anxiety, and have been described as both disturbing and beautiful. Though constantly labeled a “Neo Surrealist”, Speed describes herself as a “Pararealist”, offering a glimpse into a world that exists parallel to our own reality.

by Andy SmithPosted on


The fanciful drawings of Sam Branton often feature pastoral landscapes and wild animals, co-existing in situations that seem ripped out of storybooks. The soft-edged, yet detailed style of his pencil adds a surreal quality to the work. “I would like the drawings to appear to be, at first glance, as an old cartoon, perhaps an illustration of a fable or a mythological story,“ the artist said, in an interview with Antlers Gallery last year.

by Margot BuermannPosted on


In her paintings and ink drawings of anthropomorphous forms, Belarusian artist Alina Kunitsyna shares her personal fascination with people, and the ways in which we can simultaneously conceal and express our inward nature. Her series portrays figures obscured within garments, blankets and decorative fabrics, their faces always hidden from our view. And while her subjects may carry an air of mystery, it is through the expressions of their outer shells that we may begin to gain access to their inner worlds.

by Andy SmithPosted on


The female subjects of Sasha Ira’s drawings are at varying stages of life, symbolically encountering strings that bind them or a surrounding growth of flora. The artist’s knack for subtle expression offer varying impressions of control in how these women grapple with what’s enveloping them. In her current show at Haven Gallery in Northport, New York, “Devenir,” Ira’s graphite renderings are mixed with acrylics, colored pencil, and other mediums for pops of vibrancy. The show runs through Sept. 11.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Paris-born Ugo Gattoni’s detailed cityscapes and otherworldly scenes and objects have garnered international attention. Much of his work is rendered through graphite, ink, or pencil, through the artist has also delved into colorful animation and product design in recent years.