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Lauren YS recently returned to her comic roots with her use of black inks in the recent show “CORPUS FLUX.” The show at Juddy Roller in Melbourne featured several new drawings, exploring social and technological themes, along with a new mural adorning the building. YS was last featured on our site in this studio visit.

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Using pop culture and his distinct distortion of scale, artist Arnus crafts humorous, engrossing illustrations. His self-description as an “Ugly illustrator since 1982” offers a hint at his sense of humor, moving between both terrifying and playful characters. These pop characters include Alice Cooper, Batman, and a slew of smiling demons.

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Finland illustrator Milena Huhta crafts unsettling drawings that pull from fashion, ’90s pop, and other global influences. The artist’s projects include her own personal work, album artwork, editorial illustrations, and other projects. Huhta describes herself as a “Finnish-Polish artist with macabre inclinations.”

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Felix Dolah uses diluted charcoal to craft his minimalist, ghostly drawings. These figures, often gangly and dilapidated, come in sparse singular or as heaps of crowded, writhing characters. Elsewhere, he applies the same material to photographs, adding grim accents to archival images. He’s said that although early in life, he drew knights and monsters, “now I draw more monsters than knights.”

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Baptiste Hersoc’s drawings and paintings merge unlikely objects and organic parts, with both humorous and ghastly results. The artist has both illustration and fine art practices, with book contributions, magazine projects, and regular collaborations. His “Introspection” series uses the human body as its theme.

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Using just a pencil and paper, Nicola Alessandrini crafts striking, surreal imagery that explore the subconscious. The Italy-born artist creates scenes in which intimate figures are unraveled, producing strange growths and stripped of their normal defenses. Gender and sexuality also often play a role in Alessandrini’s works, as well as totems from childhood.