by Andy SmithPosted on

Paris-born Ugo Gattoni’s detailed cityscapes and otherworldly scenes and objects have garnered international attention. Much of his work is rendered through graphite, ink, or pencil, through the artist has also delved into colorful animation and product design in recent years.

by Margot BuermannPosted on


Cape Town artist Michael Amery shares his concerns about human impact on the environment in his series of drawings, Trees by Man. In charcoal, pen and India ink, the artist depicts forests grown for commercial use, much like the ones found in his native South Africa. A graphic designer with a background in advertising, Amery is interested in how consumerist culture is tied to man’s exploitation of the natural world and its effects on our planet’s vulnerable ecosystems.

by Margot BuermannPosted on


Rebecca Morgan’s portraits of country folk are delightfully weird if somewhat off-putting. Set in hunting camps and other woodsy environments, the artist’s work is an exploration of rural and off-the-grid culture, featuring an array of eccentric characters. Her paintings and drawings bounce between humorous, ambivalent and grotesque depictions of everyday existence in rural Appalachia, inspired by the artist’s upbringing in a small town in central Pennsylvania. Check out more of her work on Instagram.

by Margot BuermannPosted on


The tropical worlds of Pedro Varela (b. 1981 in Niterói, Brazil) look like they belong in a psychedelic dream or the pages of a storybook. And while the artist’s style builds on fairytale imagery and fantasy, his works also engage with history — namely, the 17th to 19th century “artist-scientists” who rendered an exotic vision of Tropical Paradise and the “New World” in their travels to Brazil. Blending Baroque still life, colonial iconography, and modern styles such as Neo-concretism, Varela engages with the past to create his own version of “paradise” that is at once alluring and cautionary.

by Margot BuermannPosted on


Joseph Loughborough is a British artist currently based in Berlin. His haunting figurative works, made with charcoal and gold leaf on paper, draw inspiration from philosophers Albert Camus and Søren Kierkegaard to explore notions of struggle, isolation, and absurdist belief as they relate to the human condition. Check out more of his work on his Tumblr and Flickr.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Armando Veve, a Philadelphia-based artist, creates drawings of surreal scenes and constructions, though each element is rendered in realism. His eye for detail works on granular level, with Veve’s slow and meticulous process producing countless dots and lines for one cohesive image. The style recalls both pointillism and vintage illustrations in reference books. And its striking results have garnered commissions from high-profile publications. Veve was last featured on Hi-Fructose here.