by Andy SmithPosted on

Nina Bunjevac’s masterful stippled drawings have appeared as single works, portraiture, comic books, tarot cards, commercial illustration, and other forms. All showcase the Canada-born artist’s command of shadows and subtlety, with the ability to move between the macabre and the humorous within a single frame. Earlier this year, she released her latest graphic novel, “Bezimena,” a re-imagining of the myth of Artemis and Siproites.

by Andy SmithPosted on

In his riveting, surreal ink drawings, Peter Striffolino builds new creatures from humanity’s building blocks. Though the Los Angeles artist’s practice encompasses these drawings, paintings, and animations, we’ll be taking a look at his ink work in this post. In his monochromatic work, Striffolino’s talents in texturing and linework is on display.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Sue Williams A’Court’s graphite portals into lush environments grace unexpected surfaces, with the artist’s aim to conjure a state of mindfulness rather than any specific terrain. Her work often blends painting, collage, and of course, graphite drawing. Blending both a loose style and hyperdetailed sensibility, the tension in her work brings the viewer to another place, entirely.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Having indexed many of the monsters he’s created over the past several years, illustrator and fine artist Stan Manoukian continues to create riveting scenes with these creatures in their natural habitats. Though the artist has a talent in color, his narratives take on a particularly absorbing quality when rendered only in graphite or inks.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Christine Kim’s practice is a blend of painting, drawing, and sculpture. The Toronto-based artist’s experimentations with layering and cutting works moves between both graphite drawings and painting. Each carry ghostly notes, each offering their own considerations of negative space.

by Andy SmithPosted on

In the work of Lucas Lasnier, also known as PARBO, geometric forms collide with and infiltrate our reality. Whether adorning a wall or a page, Lasnier’s penchants for both the abstract and the realistic are at play. And Lasnier’s background in urban art comes through even in his more commercial ventures.