by Andy SmithPosted on

Nomi Chi, a Vancouver-based illustrator and tattoo artist, creates mysterious, sometimes playful images that often explore identity. Whether it’s on paper, sculptural, or in mural form, these strange characters mix the absorbing and the unsettling. Though accomplished in both tattooing and illustration, the latter carries more personal themes for the artist.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Andi Soto, a Panama-based artist, uses ink, graphite, prismacolor pencils, gel pens, and other materials to create her intricate figures, often bare and seemingly vulnerable. Soto often removes flesh and other elements while adorning her female characters with head-dressings. Yet, the parts that remain are rendered in absorbing and detailed linework. In the past, the artist has described her style as “knitting with ink.”

by Andy SmithPosted on


Jenna Andersen, an artist/illustrator based in Williamsburg, Va., creates immersive, hyperdetailed scenes, often with surreal overtones. The artist often injects only pops of color into her personal work, rendering natural backdrops in intricate linework, with her animal and human subjects as the pieces’ points of entry. In other works, these typically monochromatic settings are given lush, gouache hues.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Massive drawings by Brianna Angelakis are absorbing self-portraits, placing the artist among contorted shapes and forms. The graphite work impresses at any distance, and in a statement, the artist explains her pursuit in these portraits and her own state as being “transfixed by beauty, I remain stationary amid the nonsensical world. Through a metamorphosis, my past failures transform into elements of beauty, as I become a fantastical monument to my vexation, acting within the spectacle of the absurd.” She was last featured on HiFructose.com here.

by Andy SmithPosted on


Los Angeles-based artist Sergio Barrale, who creates enormous, absorbing drawings, is now featured his first major solo show. “Our Private Religion” opens on Saturday (April 1) at Last Rites Gallery and runs through April 22. Barrale was last mentioned on HiFructose.com here, and he was included in Hi-Fructose Magazine Vol. 41.

by Andy SmithPosted on


Illustrator Mad Meg constructs massive drawings that contain layers upon layers. She often uses insect heads as a recurring visual theme, adapting even pieces from art history into new works and satire. But further than that, pieces like “Patriarch No. 4,” at 39 inches by 79 inches, contain bewildering detail on a micro level.