by CaroPosted on

Washington, DC. based artist Ashley Oubré creates compelling photoreal images with just carbon pencil, graphite and india ink. Her drawings capture private moments of shame and humiliation from insecurities that many of us face. As someone who once fought depression, she’s set out to embrace what society considers abnormal; obesity, stretch marks, age spots, and twisted spines. These are the characteristics that connect her subjects.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

The way we express ourselves intimately with our partners in real life seldom resembles the glamorous heaving and sighing of movie sex scenes. Italian artist Riccardo Mannelli eschews these cinematic cliches when he conveys personal moments between couples. In his ongoing series of works on paper, Mannelli’s approach to erotica feels natural and unpretentious. The bodies he focuses on are not idealized by any means: He honestly depicts his subjects’ aging physiques, tattoos, and body hair. By embracing these so-called imperfections, Mannelli celebrates their beauty.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on


Jim Dingilian’s work comes in the form of a message in a bottle, which he draws with the tip of candle on the glass’s surface. The result is a smokey image nestled within the bottle’s concave shape. Dingilian uses his unconventional medium in a way that evokes India ink, impressively handling the flame like a brush. His scenes are well-defined and highly detailed. Dingilian has fun with layering opaque and translucent layers of smoke, resulting in complex scenes within each vessel.

by CaroPosted on

Greg Eason has created thought provoking new images for his upcoming exhibition “CLASSIC/ LUXURY / EXOTIC / ROMANCE (C/L/E/R)” at Space W10 in London, opening January 15th. He will show alongside Bristol-based artist Anouk Mercier, where together they mix-up references of the past and future. Eason’s drawings are heavy with an empty vastness as in previous works, covered here. His use of negative space to depict Romantic subjects have merged with the exoctic. Replacing the eggs and skulls is the statue of Winged Victory of Samothrace, combined with jumping dolphins and Scarlet Macaws, stripped of their brilliance by a monochromatic palette.

by CaroPosted on

Japanese artist Yasuto Sasada, just 27 years old, has already made a name for himself in the modern art and fashion world, through his collaborations with Yohji Yamamoto. Sasada has his own visual language that combines cultural traditions with the future. His detailed pen drawings of creatures mix motifs from modern technology and religion. Their black and white tonality, achieved with a thin 0.3mm pen, is harshly contrasted against bright pink, blue, and green backgrounds. He’s created a new form of painting that juxtaposes old and contemporary ideas, taking us into an entirely new dimension.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Rachel Fagiano subsumes her characters in copious fungal growths that tower over them like enormous headpieces. The artist draws with a combination of micropigment ink and graphite on paper. Her colorful, trippy-looking mushrooms stand out against the white backgrounds. Fagiano’s characters seem to be in constant conflict with one another, though it’s unclear for what reason. They pinch, hit, and choke each other in a blind rage — perhaps hinting at the senselessness of violence. Her work evokes that of Chinese artist Zhou Fan, whom we covered on the blog previously here.