by CaroPosted on

There are many great artists whose primary medium include pencil and paper, but the artist’s sketch is not always intended as a finished work. A sketch may serve a number of purposes: it might record something that the artist sees, it might develop an idea for later use or it might be used as a quick way of graphically demonstrating an image. For those who refer to drawing to work out their ideas, a sketch becomes a rare piece seldom shared with their audience. As such, there is a special air of mystery that is associated with drawings. We’ve featured artists’ drawings in our Sketchbook Series on our blog, and in our print issues, where we’ve shone a light on scarcely shown sketch work by artists like Marco Mazzoni, and Femke Hiemstra, and Mark Ryden, to name a few. A new group exhibition “Lápiz, Papel o Tijera” (Pencil, Paper, Scissors) at Plastic Murs gallery in Spain aims to do the same for 30 artists.

by CaroPosted on

Brooklyn based artist Allison Sommers mixes elements that are grotesque with natural beauty in her organic mixed media portrayals of animals and figures. Yet despite their disproportions and seemingly exposed internal organs, up close, her works reveal a certain charm and expressiveness. Featured on our blog over the years, she once told us, “I was always trying to draw existing animals as best I could, and once I knew I could draw them, they would start getting a little less realistic”, describing them as naughty creatures, tired beasts, delicious sausages, and exotic feasts. Opening on January 23rd at Last Rites Gallery in New York, Sommers will exhibit a new series of graphite on paper and gouache with mixed media on paper work in “What Passing Bells”.

by CaroPosted on

There’s an innocence and fleeing quality about Kevin Townsend’s organic chalk drawings that cover entire spaces, an act that he says liberates him from the confines of the artist’s studio. We’ve featured many chalk artists on our blog over the years, but Townsend, who is also a teacher, uses this child’s mark making tool specifically for its impermanence. The Boston based artist finds himself captivated by the idea of how time and our perception of it helps to shape our identities, as well as our relationship to overlooked urban environments.

by CaroPosted on

In Laurie Lipton’s recent works, featured here, the artist take us into a world that feels overwhelmed with technology. It is a place where wires, screens, emojis and other aspects of our modern day communication devices define this world’s movement and style. She calls it a “Techno Rococo” of sorts, the title and basis of her latest series of drawings which debuted over the weekend at Ace Gallery in Los Angeles.

by CaroPosted on

Melancholic girls find themselves in moments of quiet drama in the works of British artist Craww and San Francisco based (and Hi-Fructose co-founder) Annie Owens. Where Craww’s pieces feature heroines with an almost spiritual-like quality, Owens’ black and white watercolors and sketches enhance the mystery of her subjects. Both artists will present new works in side by side solo exhibitions opening on October 29th at Antler Gallery in Portland.

by CaroPosted on

Seoul, South Korea based artist Daehuyn Kim, aka “Moonassi”, started his black and white drawing series in 2008 and has no intentions of stopping. Moonassi’s “life-time project”, he calls it, reads like a diary. “Each drawing is created based on my daily thoughts and feelings. I draw to meditate on myself and others, to be able to see the whole story of the series in the end,” he says.