by Andy SmithPosted on


Anton Vill, an Estonia-based artist, crafts intricate, surreal drawings of wild scenes and characters. Though Vill’s background was in concept art, working in pre-production in films like “Mad Max: Fury Road,” Vill pivoted toward illustration in recent years. The result is a world overrun by hordes of babies and unsettling creatures. Vill was last featured on HiFructose.com here.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Australian-Spanish artist Tom “Dilly” Littleson works as an illustrator and graphic designer in Melbourne. Littleson’s realistic pencil drawings are found in various publications across the world. These illustrations have wide-ranging subjects, yet the artist’s personal work most commonly seems to contain a visceral, sometimes gruesome quality contained within single characters. As unsettling as these tend to be, the subjects themselves don’t seem to be bothered by the mayhem.

by Andy SmithPosted on


Vasco Mourao, who goes by the moniker Mister Mourao, describes himself as “an architect turned into an artist with a tendency for obsessive drawing.” In his new series, “Ouroborus,” he combines mediums for renderings of buildings that flow in continuous loops. These structures neither begin nor end, offering countless points of entry.

by Andy SmithPosted on


Scott Tulay is an artist and architect based in Amherst, Mass., crafting ghostly drawings that play with light, shadow, and a distorted version of familiar structures. Tulay’s command of space and design bring an engrossing order to his otherwise otherworldly creations. And whether it’s ink, charcoal, pastel, graphite, or a combination of all, his drawings offer vibrant arrangements that loom like vivid apparitions.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Australian artist Lucy Hardie’s pen and ink creations are crafted with a fine stippling technique, resulting in enchanting and surreal scenes. Mostly self-taught, the Melbourne-based artist cites H.J. Ford, Matthias Grunewald, Ivan Bilibin, and the Old Masters as influences. Hardie was last mentioned on HiFructose.com here.

by Andy SmithPosted on


The faces of subjects in Björn Griesbach’s “Hollow Children” are smudged in graphite on mylar, save for the wide grins rendered ominous in the process. The German illustator, based Hannover, has a knack for evoking specific moods with pops of colors and detailed renderings, but this series offers a simpler, bleak approach. Griesbach was last featured on HiFructose.com here.