by Andy SmithPosted on

In a new collection of paintings and drawings, Kevin Cyr pays tribute to the working class via worn vehicles spotted and documented around New York City. “Labor Day” at Jonathan Levine Projects in New Jersey progresses the artist’s love affair with the concept of what vehicles say about the people who drive them. Cyr first appeared in the pages of this magazine in Hi-Fructose Vol. 10, and he’s part of the “Turn the Page: The First 10 Years of Hi-Fructose” exhibit, currently at Crocker Art Museum.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Jess Johnson’s drawings and mixed-media works are meticulous in design, yet wild and otherworldly in content. Throughout her work, the New Zealand-born artist implements text to help provide more information and riddles about these strange worlds. Her new show at New York’s Jack Hanley Gallery, “Everything not saved will be lost,” collects these works, plus large-scale and absorbing installations.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Spanish artist Liqen somehow moves between the paper and the public wall without compromising his intricate, absorbing linework. His wild creations often carry surreal sensibilities and a hidden treasure in every corner. The artist’s work tends to be influenced by an early passion in nature, and in specific, the diversity of species and sights it provides.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Scott M. Fischer is widely known for his illustrative works, whether it’s comic book covers, kids’ books, concept design, or game art. Yet his fine art practice, free from the confines of depicting set characters or situations, offers a different look at the artist. His hyperdetailed, dreamlike works recall both classical influences and a contemporary edge, while blending digital and traditional tools.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Artist John Mahoney crafts strange, futuristic illustrations that are marked by absorbing detail and shifting perspectives. He’s also had a hand in products from Lucasfilm, Disney, Blizzard, Hasbro Cartoon Network, and Miramax in various roles under visual development and conceptual art. Yet, perhaps his most personal project is “Zentropa,” a graphic novel “30 years in the making” that features no word bubbles and serves as a stream-of-conscious, unpredictable narrative.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Felicia Chiao, a self-described “industrial designer by day and illustrator by night,” crafts drawings of humorous and fantastical scenes, packed with vibrant details. Her signature bald, naked protagonist seems to be a stand-in for all of us, taking in the wonder or other range of emotions in each piece.