by Andy SmithPosted on

“The most Colombian of Colombian artists” is a descriptor self-bestowed by Fernando Botero, a figure whose legacy is a voluminous as the people, objects, and animals the 87-year-old has painted and sculpted for decades. The singular nature of that phrase is juxtaposed with the artist’s close-knit family life in the documentary “Botero.” The film, which has its European premiere at DocsBarcelona today, tracks the artist’s aim to “be a chapter in art history,” as one interviewee states, as he looms larger and larger in the art world—and at home.

by Andy SmithPosted on


Laurie Lipton

New documentary “Art & Mind” explores the ties between art and madness and looks at visionaries spanning centuries, from Hieronymus Bosch to Laurie Lipton. (Lipton was featured in a special insert in Hi-Fructose Vol. 46.) The film, helmed by Amélie Ravalec, also features Van Gogh, Munch, Dali, Bruegel, William Kurelek, Antonin Artaud, Paul Rumsey, and several, several other artists. Also included in the conversation are a range of experts in art history, psychology, and neuroscience.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Italian sculptor Maurizio Cattelan has been a force of satire and provocativeness for the past few decades in the art world. He’s turned heads with sculptures of Pope John Paul II struck down by a meteorite, a praying Hitler in a former Warsaw Ghetto, and a taxidermied squirrel moments after suicide by self-inflicted gunshot. A new documentary, “Maurizio Cattelan: Be Right Back,” explores the life of the controversial artist.

by CaroPosted on

There is a magical quality to Brad Kunkle’s paintings that is difficult to capture online and in print alone. The Brooklyn based painter combines oil painting with gold and silver leaf to create ethereal visions of women, often in a state of transcendence or as if they are on some spiritual quest. We first featured Brad Kunkle in Hi-Fructose Vol 25, who seeks to go beyond the limits of the ordinary human experience. Looking at his art requires a deepening of our perceptions, and to filmmaker Brennan Stasiewicz, it holds a humanizing power.