by Andy SmithPosted on

Patrick Jacobs crafts dioramas viewed through a window and presenting “the viewer with a spatial and perceptual conundrum.” The artist combines sculpture, painting, and other media to create these lush scenes, moving between the familiar and the otherworldly in seemingly endless lanscapes. Recent dioramas have offered a larger, more immersive viewpoint.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Tatsuya Tanaka’s photographs combines normal objects and tiny figures to craft surreal scenes. A phone becomes a fishing hole; a whistle becomes a slide. In each of these daily works, the artist uses scale and humor to make us re-examine the items we use each day. The blissful creations are part of an ongoing, daily project. An enormous catalog of these scenes goes back to April of 2011.

by Andy SmithPosted on

At first glance, the Kaitlyn Schwalje sculpture “Unfit for Consumption” appears to tell a parable of some sort. The top of the piece scene seems serene, with grazing boars and a strange liquid form taking shape. Yet, a more ominous narrative forms when one looks below. The truth is that Schwalje’s sculpture has even stranger, yet real-world origins.

by CaroPosted on

Tracey Snelling is currently featured in our Turn the Page: The First Ten Years of Hi-Fructose exhibition at Virginia MOCA, Imagining Home at the Baltimore Museum of Art, and soon at Volta Basel, opening this week. We caught up with her to talk about her new works, which collectively offer psychedelic versions of places, as in her recreation of strip clubs, as well as her own criticisms, expressed in “Shoot It!”, a commentary on gun rights in America.

by CaroPosted on

Detroit based multimedia artist Andy Krieger is inspired by ordinary subjects from his every life, but when applied to his three-dimensional paintings, something extraordinary happens. “I make art work that straddles a boundary between two and three dimensions,” Krieger writes. “Sculptural paintings with an open ended narrative, that also starts a dialogue between the piece and the viewer about perception and perspective.” More like dioramas, his art makes us rethink how we look at painting.

by CaroPosted on

Bilbo’s hobbit hole, a rusty ranch, and a workshop with an old Thunderbird ’55 are just a few of the tiny worlds hand-crafted by Raphael Truffi Bortholuzzi. The Sao Paulo based artist and miniaturist began building the dioramas in 2010, an ongoing project that he calls “Grandmondo Miniatures”, meaning “big world” miniatures. Though his dioramas are fantastic in their smallness, and sometimes delve into imagined worlds, for the most part, Bortholuzzi says he is interested in imitating real life.