by Andy SmithPosted on


Jun Seo Hahm is a Seoul-based digital animator and designer, known for his delightful fictional creatures that inhabit other worlds. Much of the artist’s work is rooted in his lifelong fascination with the scientific field of biology. In an interview with the publication Massage, he says he actually considers himself to be a reverse-biologist. Instead of studying real creatures in the natural world, he creates new ones and worlds for them to inhabit.

by Andy SmithPosted on


“Subway Doodle” is the name Ben Rubin uses when posting drawings he makes on his commute to and from work each day. The artist snaps a photo and using his iPad, he inserts monsters, animals, and occasionally horrifying scenes into everyday life. Sometimes, the fictional creatures soak in the banality of the subway with fellow passengers. Other times, unsuspecting passengers are unaware of the terror that sits next to them.

by Andy SmithPosted on


For almost a decade, Beeple has sat down every day and made something. The digital artist uses a variety of programs and apps for his Everydays Project, an ongoing series of works uploaded to the artist’s site every day. Beeple is the moniker of artist Mike Winkelmann, who describes himself as making “a variety of art crap across a variety of media.”

by CaroPosted on

“Void Season” is a different kind of fashion project that makes us excited to see how the future of fashion is going to look. What first appears as an eccentric, simulated dance and a color-coordinated Tumblr exploration turns out to be a study of algorithmic textiles and procedural surfaces. This digital magic was created by the Berlin, Germany based design studio known as Zeitguised. Their mesmerizing visuals are crafted as a unique blend of tantalizing design, handmade algorithms and bespoke generative processes.

by Clara MoraesPosted on

Magnus Gjoen’s digital works make us look twice to grasp their meaning. He wants us to see in a different light, being it weapons, animals or the human race itself. Gjoen’s unique style of juxtaposing themes of religion, war, beauty, and destruction in his art, featured on our blog here, bring us to also question their correlation.

by CaroPosted on

Tokyo based collective known as teamLab describe themselves as “ultra-technologists”, artists who seek to merge art, technology and design in their work, designed to allow viewers to have a more personal and unique connection with art. With Japanese designer Toshiyuki Inoko at the helm, the collective’s installations are nothing short of magical- featured here on our blog, they are a spontaneous experience where artworks come to “life” as animation when approached by visitors. The secret to the magic behind their work is motion sensors that pick up the viewer’s movements, prompting paintings of the natural world to become a blooming and wilting garden of delights. Pace Art + Technology in Silicon Valley, California, seeking to create an environment that encourages educational play, invited teamLab to join their Future Park series- the result of which is “Living Digital Space and Future Parks” opening on February 6th.