by Andy SmithPosted on

In Erika Zolli’s “A Little Known Marble” series, she blends mediums by photographing monochromatic marble sculptures from Galleria d’Arte Moderna in Milan and digitally adding “the typical color of ancient sculptures,” fighting against any notion that the “classical world was devoid of color.”

by Andy SmithPosted on

Using 3D scanning, artist Frederik Heyman created “virtual embalmings,” in which digitally crafted memorials are curated by their subjects. In this series, created for the Nowness program “Define Beauty,” he “embalmed” fashion and entertainment figures Isabelle Huppert, Kim Peers and Michèle Lamy with their careful input.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Whether as still portraits or in motion, the mutants and forms created by Erik Ferguson are disconcerting in their realistic textures. The artist moves between high-profile and personal project, working on the likes of Guardians of the Galaxy and live performances for Rihanna. With assignments like album artwork for The Horrors, the artist’s own sensibilities come through even more.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Shamus Clisset, who works under the moniker Fake Shamus, crafts all-digital works that only appear to be sourced from photographs. Taking inspiration from pop culture, historical objects, and other Western elements, he creates figures and scenes with unclear origins. His practice touches modeling, rendering, and animation.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Parker S. Jackson says he tries to strike a balance between “uncanny and realism” in his portraits, which carry notes of both humor and dark art. One of the artist’s greatest strengths is in his ability to create varying, perplexing textures with both digital and traditional materials. We asked the artist about his influences, which he says range from centuries-old work to contemporary pop culture.

by Andy SmithPosted on

In Tokyo’s Odaiba district, the world’s biggest museum dedicated to interactive digital art is now open. The Digital Art Museum opened by Mori Building and teamLab has 107,000 square feet, with simulations created by 470 projectors and 520 computers.