by Andy SmithPosted on

Max Guther, a 25-year-old illustrator living in Germany, Guther creates “digital collages by transforming photographic material, textures and self-constructed objects.” The artist uses a top-down perspective reminiscent of computer games of yesterday, offering both a voyeuristic and broad point of view. In a series of illustrations titled “The Goodlife,” Guther explores the balance of relaxation, work, and “social environment.”

by Andy SmithPosted on

Chad Knight’s vibrant digital art moves between the meditative and the frenetic. A 3D designer with Nike by the day, the artist’s personal work seems to exist in alien worlds, with his works being made in Cinema 4D. These are places inhabited enormous, elaborate beings that appear in mid-evolution. The artist posts a new creation each day on his Instagram account, part of an ongoing, prolific effort.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Russian artist Uno Moralez crafts images that are a throwback to seemingly less sophisticated, earlier days of digital art. Yet, what the artist has done is forge a novel, fascinating way to communicate narrative. They’re not quite comics, yet Moralez often depends on more than one image to share his stories, which move between pulp, campy horror, sci-fi, or something stranger and dream-like.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Jean-Michel Bihorel, a Paris-based digital artist, crafts bewildering illustrations of otherworldly figures and scenes. These creatures can have a natural make-up, like floral collections or delicate landscapes, or they seem entirely alien. Bihoral works as a CG supervisor for Mécanique Générale and is a co-founder and mentor of CreativeSeeds, a training school for aspiring animators.

by Andy SmithPosted on


Jun Seo Hahm is a Seoul-based digital animator and designer, known for his delightful fictional creatures that inhabit other worlds. Much of the artist’s work is rooted in his lifelong fascination with the scientific field of biology. In an interview with the publication Massage, he says he actually considers himself to be a reverse-biologist. Instead of studying real creatures in the natural world, he creates new ones and worlds for them to inhabit.

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“Subway Doodle” is the name Ben Rubin uses when posting drawings he makes on his commute to and from work each day. The artist snaps a photo and using his iPad, he inserts monsters, animals, and occasionally horrifying scenes into everyday life. Sometimes, the fictional creatures soak in the banality of the subway with fellow passengers. Other times, unsuspecting passengers are unaware of the terror that sits next to them.