by Andy SmithPosted on


Richard A. Kirk‘s drawings emerge out of nature, using its elements to craft strange creatures and scenes. He’s brought this sensibility in illustrations for the likes of Clive Barker, Caitlin R. Kiernan, Christopher Golden, and others. However, in his personal work, we find these monsters and ideas roaming free from specific narrative.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Whether rendered in graphite or oils, the shadowed subjects of Allen Williams thrill in both what’s being shown and what’s being obscured. In a new show at Copro Gallery, titled “Covenant,” a massive amount of work from Williams is displayed. This is the artist’s first solo show with the gallery.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Philadelphia artist Nathan Reidt crafts scenes in which everyday objects and beings garner growths and mutations. His drawings, in particular, carry a particular eeriness in their starkness, the artist’s abilities with light adding depth to each creation.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Alexander Reisfar’s eerie paintings are packed with intricate creatures and dark surrealist undertones. Both brooding and elegant, works created by the Oregon-based artist have been features across the U.S. The artist is able to navigate political and wartime themes with the iconography depicted in his paintings.

by Andy SmithPosted on

The eerie works of William Basso blend painting, drawing, photography, collage, and sculpture. And even more varied are the influences of these strange scenes, from Eastern European art and the Renaissance to pulp comics and folklore. The artist’s work is influenced by his experience in the film industry, crafting special-effect characters.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Tokyo-born painter Toru Kamei is known for painting what he calls “beautiful nightmares,” arresting oil scenes that balance nature and morbidity. He was last featured on HiFructose.com here, and since that piece, the artist has a breakthrough in the fashion world. The artist recently collaborated with Dior Homme on an exclusive collection, implementing his work into both accessories and ensembles. Belgian fashion designer Kris Van Assche reportedly came across the artist’s work when researching floral motifs.