by Andy SmithPosted on

“Necrosurrealist” David Van Gough offers a new body of work that pulls from literary and Biblical narratives in “Paradiso’s Fall.” Kicking off today at Dark Art Emporium, several new paintings comprise this series. Each painting is dense in both its creatures and references to the cultural touchstones that influence the artist.

by Andy SmithPosted on

There’s both an absorbing and a grotesque quality to the paintings of Mow Skwoz. Whether in acrylics or watercolors, Skwoz blends realistic skin tones with geometric abstractions and frames. Her cerebral series of “Inner Peace” works, in particular, appear as writhing and distorted characters.

by Andy SmithPosted on


Samuel Araya

Artist Chet Zar and collector-author Jeremy Wagner have co-curated “Conjoined Vs. Grotesque,” a group show celebrating “the Denizens of the Dark.” The show arrives Jan. 19 at Copro Gallery and runs through Feb. 16. Artists on the roster include Zar himself (who was last featured on HiFructose.com here), Kazuhiro Tsuji, Jay Weinberg, Shane Pierce, Louie Becker, Matt Dangler, Gene Ambo, Claudio Bergamin, Max Verehin, Vincent Villafranca, Dan Harms, Mark Rudolph, Miroslav Petro, Zack Dunn, Dominic Holmes, Carin Hazmat, Magnus Gjoen, Ronald Gonzalez, Bob Tyrrell, Rob Smits, Kevin Estrada, Wes Benscoter, Ed Repka, Dan Seagrave, Andreas Marschall, Scott Musgrove, Ryan Matthew Cohn, and others.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Scott Kirschner’s provoking paintings obscure as many as they reveal, blending fantasy and dark surrealism in each scene. His fine art practice is complemented from an illustration career, where he became one of the first major artists associated with the Magic: The Gathering card game. His recent shows, with galleries such as Arch Enemy Arts, offer an unchained look inside the artist’s mind.

by Andy SmithPosted on


Richard A. Kirk‘s drawings emerge out of nature, using its elements to craft strange creatures and scenes. He’s brought this sensibility in illustrations for the likes of Clive Barker, Caitlin R. Kiernan, Christopher Golden, and others. However, in his personal work, we find these monsters and ideas roaming free from specific narrative.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Whether rendered in graphite or oils, the shadowed subjects of Allen Williams thrill in both what’s being shown and what’s being obscured. In a new show at Copro Gallery, titled “Covenant,” a massive amount of work from Williams is displayed. This is the artist’s first solo show with the gallery.