by CaroPosted on

Philadelphia based artist Crystal Wagner recently exhibited a colorful new installation at the National Museum of Singapore. “Wanderlust” is a site-specific piece that she created for the museum’s “Masak Masak 2015” exhibition, a part of their ‘season of the children’ celebrations. Previously covered here on our blog, Wagner’s largescale works are attention grabbing for her choice of curious and unconventional materials including paper, chicken wire, and tablecloths. Measuring a massive 70 feet long, her new piece is made out of pliable materials such as crepe paper and wire, from which she shaped tunnels for children to play in and crawl through.

by CaroPosted on

She’s been dubbed as “the artist who can work anywhere”, and this is especially true of Crysal Wagner’s most recent installation, “Fall”. It can be found inside the campus of University of Tennessee, 4 stories of blue cascading down the school’s Art & Architecture building. “Fall” is exactly 60 feet tall, but its flowing mesh, made of party table clothes, chicken wire, and screen printing, feels almost never ending. More photos after the jump!

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Chicken wire and shredded dollar store table cloths are all Crystal Wagner sees over the multiple days it takes her to weave and sculpt one of her signature installations. Her work mimics organic shapes found in nature but betrays its artificiality with its fluorescent color schemes. Wagner recently debuted her latest installation, “Elasticity,” on view through February 6 at Bagwell Art Gallery at the Pellissippi State Community College campus in Knoxville, Tennessee. Made from the aforementioned materials, the colorful piece dominates the exhibition space and is one of Wagner’s most elaborate works to date.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Officially opening today, Art Prize is a unique art festival and contest — perhaps one of the most democratic iterations of an art fair out there. The unlikely locale of Grand Rapids, Michigan becomes a playground for artists. Any part of downtown is fair game to use as a venue — no gallery endorsement needed — and anyone, regardless of their resume, can qualify as an exhibitor. The art projects are on view for two weeks while the public votes on which artist will be awarded the large cash prize. For her entry, artist Crystal Wagner created two installations in the Urban Institute for Contemporary Arts using household items (plastic table cloths and chicken wire are two of her signature materials) to weave two enormous, sprawling sculptures in the venue’s entrance and along the south staircase.