by Hi-Fructose StaffPosted on


Greg “Craola” Simkins

The 41st volume of Hi-Fructose arrives in October on store shelves! Pre-order the issue here. This issue’s special 16-page glossy insert showcases cover artist, Greg “Craola” Simkins. Vol.41 features include the art of soft sculptures of John Casey, the gigantic drawings of Sergio Barrale, the cinematic photography of Gregory Crewdson, the sculptures of Crystal Morey, the other-worldly paintings of Smithe, the installations of Crystal Wagner, the dream-like paintings of Shang Chengxiang, and the beautiful sculptures of Gosia. Plus, multi-page reviews on Marion Pecks‘s career-spanning monograph, and a book review on the pin-hole photography of Bethany De Dorest.

See more previews of Hi-Fructose Vol.41 here!

You can also click here to subscribe to Hi-Fructose.

by CaroPosted on

Oregon based artist Zoe Keller and Michigan based Christina Mrozik each enhance the beauty of nature in their drawings. Their graphite drawings take inspiration from natural forms and creatures, recreating them in highly stylized compositions. The pair have embraced their stylistic similarities by collaborating together on a new exhibition at Portland’s Antler Gallery. Titled “Intricacies”, their exhibition renders nature with intricate detail in an elaborate narrative featuring flora and fauna.

by CaroPosted on

“We are leaving many vulnerable species and habitats frantic, facing disruptions and uncertain outcomes,” says Oakland based artist Crystal Morey. Featured on our blog, her ceramic sculptures of people wearing animal skins express her personal connection to nature- and our strained relationship to it. “In my work, I investigate these actions while also creating an evocative and mysterious narrative that shows our interdependence with the land and animals around us.” Morey’s upcoming exhibition “At the Edge of Time” at Antler Gallery in Portland will debut a new series of small eagle, bear, and deer-headed figure, portrayed completely absorbed in some secret conference.

by CaroPosted on

Oakland, California based artist Crystal Morey feels a special connection to nature that stems from her childhood years spent in the Sierra Nevada foothills. When she moved to the city, her entire perspective changed. “I once saw humans as being under the umbrella of “nature,” subservient to natural happening. I now realize humans are the largest variable in the changing of our planet’s ecological and environmental outcome,” she says. This is the driving motivation behind her sculptures of totem-like creatures inspired by various cultures; human characters wrapped in the skins of eagles, bears, deer, rabbits and other animals.