by Andy SmithPosted on

Rendered in colored pencil and graphite, the new works of David Jien expand his wild worlds in a show at Richard Heller Gallery. “All Is Not Lost,” running through Nov. 2 at the Santa Monica space, moves between his strange scenes and shelves of curiosities. Jien was last featured on our site here.

by Andy SmithPosted on

William A. Hall was homeless for 18 years before his intricate colored pencil drawings of vehicles and futurescapes were discovered and brought to the public. During the past few years, his work has been displayed by Henry Boxer Gallery and brought to museum collections specializing in folk and outsider art.

by Andy SmithPosted on

In the past, Jillian Dickson’s colored pencil drawings blended flowers and female anatomy. With “My Undies,” the artist’s realistic, vibrant style highlights a different brand of intimate imagery. The artist says that “the reality of women’s underwear seems to be one big dirty secret.”

by Andy SmithPosted on


David Jien’s works on paper and sculptures blend modern pop culture and video games with historical iconography and imagery. These hyperdetailed works can feel both mythological and like a Nintendo RPG. The Los Angeles-based artist uses colored pencil and graphite on his paper works, along with occasional use of holographic film and other elements that add to their otherworldly nature.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Andrew Chuani Ho, a Los Angeles native, creates vibrant scenes with colored pencil on paper, with works that are both surreal and autobiographical. In his first solo show at Richard Heller Gallery, titled Days and Day, the artist brings his trademark insanity and blending components in a new set of works. The artist cites influences like Matisse, Marquez, and even Henry Darger. From the gallery: “Having a deeply spiritual upbringing, Ho’s work exhibits the use of patterns, colors and symbols to reinterpret myths and fables of yore into meditatively drawn colored pencil drawings.”

by Andy SmithPosted on

Paul White focuses on a single medium in creating his hyper-detailed works: colored pencil on paper. In particular, the artist is focused on the concepts of decay and objects becoming obsolete. In terms of source material, much of his work is derived from photographs taken of desertscapes and other scenes across the West Coast.