by Andy SmithPosted on


The strange worlds of David Ball are forged with acrylic paint, colored pencil, and collaged materials. The artist’s pieces have been described as “otherworldly dreamscapes, composed through the harvesting of an endless trove of carefully selected images.” With this varied blend of materials, there’s both an organic (and animalistic) and mechanical quality to these creatures.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Dustin Yellin continues to evolve his stirring, enormous figures, comprised of collaged materials encased in layers of glass. His “Psychogeographies” are considered to be part of a landmark series of works in sculpture and collage. Yellin was last featured on HiFructose.com here.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Philadelphia-based artist Jim Houser combines acrylics, found objects, and wood to create works that are both painting and collage. In using his “signature style of visual poetry and personal iconography,” the artist creates works that at once fresh and nostalgic. In a new show with Adam Wallacavage titled “And Yet Not Yet” at Philly’s Paradigm Gallery + Studio, Houser shows were this passion has led him lately. The artist was last featured on HiFructose.com here.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Puerto Rican artist Cristina Toro creates intricate acrylic paintings and collages that often explore both the interior and our connections to the outside world. Her works appear as both surreal and personal revelations, as the artist often sets out with no final image in mind. In a new show at LaCa Projects in Charlotte, N.C., these ideas take on grand forms in works like the enormous “Without Exception Everything is Reflected in this Mirror,” at 12 feet by 9 feet. The piece itself took her more than a year to complete.

by Andy SmithPosted on

The handcrafted works of Rebeka Elizegi, a collage artist based in Barcelona, Spain, come in varying sizes and scopes. And much of Elizegi’s work involves the female figure, along with the topics of “generic diversity and sexual ambiguity,” according to the artist. The artist says that she’s often fascinated by what the observer interprets from her surreal works, with much of the visuals intentionally garnering differing takes.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Alexis Anne Mackenzie’s handcut collages of found images and pages from vintage books in her latest body of work. By taking pictures like scenic backdrops and splitting them with photos of women and other figures, Mackenzie creates stirring, moody works on paper. The work can be at once empowering and seemingly treacherous for those depicted. Works like “Closer to the Sun,” above, combine like objects, creates a synthesis between the beauty of flight and womanhood. The body of work is part of the show “Never Odd or Even” at Eleanor Harwood Gallery in San Francisco.