by Andy SmithPosted on

Puerto Rican artist Cristina Toro creates intricate acrylic paintings and collages that often explore both the interior and our connections to the outside world. Her works appear as both surreal and personal revelations, as the artist often sets out with no final image in mind. In a new show at LaCa Projects in Charlotte, N.C., these ideas take on grand forms in works like the enormous “Without Exception Everything is Reflected in this Mirror,” at 12 feet by 9 feet. The piece itself took her more than a year to complete.

by Andy SmithPosted on

The handcrafted works of Rebeka Elizegi, a collage artist based in Barcelona, Spain, come in varying sizes and scopes. And much of Elizegi’s work involves the female figure, along with the topics of “generic diversity and sexual ambiguity,” according to the artist. The artist says that she’s often fascinated by what the observer interprets from her surreal works, with much of the visuals intentionally garnering differing takes.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Alexis Anne Mackenzie’s handcut collages of found images and pages from vintage books in her latest body of work. By taking pictures like scenic backdrops and splitting them with photos of women and other figures, Mackenzie creates stirring, moody works on paper. The work can be at once empowering and seemingly treacherous for those depicted. Works like “Closer to the Sun,” above, combine like objects, creates a synthesis between the beauty of flight and womanhood. The body of work is part of the show “Never Odd or Even” at Eleanor Harwood Gallery in San Francisco.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Melissa Moffat, a Toronto-based collagist, uses comic book clippings to create abstract collages. Using classic characters, the artist deconstructs the characters’ costumes and familiar forms to construct something wholly new. Yet, in a sense, the resulting work offers insight into the visual nuance of these iconic heroes and villains.

by Margot BuermannPosted on


San Francisco-based visual artist Nicholas Bohac contemplates “the big picture” in his immersive, mixed media works that feature celestial figures amidst dreamlike landscapes. In his artist statement, Bohac writes that his purpose is “to question the universe and where, exactly, people fit into it… Through my work, I aim to explore the overall phenomenon of what it means to be human, past, present and future.”

by Margot BuermannPosted on


Mexican artist and arts educator Claudio Dicochea is best known for his contemporary reworkings of 18th century casta paintings, featuring a plethora of media idols and public figures sourced from world history and popular culture. Dicochea describes his work as “a contemporary re-examination of mestizaje, or mixed race identity” that explores “the legacy of colonial representation, hybrid identity, and contemporary media stereotypes.”