by CaroPosted on

“I think listening to some songs can be a lot like looking at a painting. The meaning can vary greatly depending on who’s listening and what they’re feeling at the time and where they’re at in their lives. I love the idea of something being so open to interpretation,” shares Nate Frizzel on his recent show at CHG Circa, “Dark Was The Night”. The show borrows very loose inspiration from 1920s gospel song, “Dark is the Night”. It is what paved the direction Frizzel wanted to go in. The rest, he leaves to the beholder. Photos from opening night after the jump!

by Nick PizanaPosted on

Born in Philadelphia and raised in Fresno, Luke Chueh (featured in HF Vol. 24) has gained much notoriety in Los Angeles art scene with his colorful, illustrative paintings. His upcoming exhibition “Self-ish” at CHG Circa in Culver City, is the latest continuation of Chueh’s stand-out style. A cast of playful-looking characters, the adult world that they live in and the dissimilarity between the two is a primary theme of the 20 new pieces Chueh will have on display. “My work is an illustrative exploration of visual and narrative contrast” Chueh said describing his work.

by CaroPosted on

Last Saturday, CHG Circa showed us every kind of giant you can think of with their group show “Giants Among Us” (previewed here). Giants are a timeless myth that has inspired artists for centuries. For Circa’s contemporary artists- Anita Kunz, Andrew Brandou, Armando Marino, Benjamin Bryce Kelley, Eric Joyner, Joe Fenton, John Brophy, Korin Faught, So Youn Lee, to name a few- giants are monstrous beasts, revered figures, a narrative and a concept. With so many literal and wildly conceptual ideas, it becomes a sort of game to find the giant in each.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

This Saturday, CHG Circa will debut “Giants Among Us,” a group show that challenged artists to interpret the figure of the giant and how it plays out in folklore, contemporary culture and their own mythology.The group of mostly narrative painters each had their own unique interpretation of what a giant might look like. In John Brophy’s digital-looking painting, a triumphant character in a furry battle costume appears to be the giant compared to a small firefly resting on her finger. Korin Faught and Armando Marino also opt for subtle ways of approaching the theme. In Faught’s Impressionistic work, a larger-than-average human skull hints at a giant’s presence, while a dark shadow over a river makes us wonder what’s about to happen in Marino’s piece.

by CaroPosted on

Last Saturday, CHG Circa offered pint sized works by their favorite artists in “Art Collector Starter Kit” 2. If you’re like most collectors, you know how to buy art on a piece-by-piece basis, but may not be all that well versed in the art that is collecting. This show offers a solution. In the gallery’s own words, “The motivation behind an exhibition of all 12”x12” paintings stems from the fact that newer collectors, or enthusiasts, who have never bought an original piece from one of their favorite artists, may now do so.”

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Eerily cheery and cheerily eerie, Nouar’s resin-dipped mixed-media works debuted at her solo show “Satisfaction Guaranteed” at CHG Circa in Culver City on July 19. Her confectionary work — somewhere between painting and sculpture, two-dimensional and three-dimensional — was paired with Hikari Shimoda’s (HF Vol. 29) equally vivid, candy-colored series of paintings in her concurrent show “Fantastic Planet, Goodbye Man” opening on the same night.