by Andy SmithPosted on

Sunkoo Yuh’s clusters of ceramic figures traverse different cultures and topics. His vibrant arrangements of characters range from desk-sized pieces to towering creations. Packed in the pieces are ancient icons, occasional religious figures, and more, sometimes reacting to each other within one set.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Alessandro Gallo‘s ceramic human-animal characters are often caught in the most candid and casual moments. Gallo’s garnered a reputation for these hybrid creatures, such as the one above, currently featured in the “Ceramics Now” show at The International Museum of Ceramics in Faenza.

by Andy SmithPosted on

In Rebecca Morgan’s ceramics work, her surreal and humorous sensibility is at its most visceral. Her sculptural work often takes the form out of unsettling, yet enchanting heads, carrying exaggerated features and expressions.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Sara Catapano’s ceramic sculptures appear as absorbing, yet disconcerting biomorphic forms that defy their medium. Though there are otherworldly qualities to these pieces, the artist’s observations here on Earth play a direct role in the creation of her work. She says that “these bio-expressive forms are, in some ways, reactions and responses to social and personal experiences.”

by Andy SmithPosted on

Ceramicist Hitomi Hosono creates vessels born from several, leaf- and flower-like forms. These porcelain pieces carry the rich textures and shapes of their inspiration, even in their interiors. The artist cites both the traditions of Europe and Japan in her approach. Based in the U.K., the artist studied in Japan and Denmark before moving her practice.

by Andy SmithPosted on

In a show titled “Posthumorous / Post Mort ’em,” La Luz de Jesus looks back at the work of Click Mort, who passed away last year. Mort, known for his “recapitated figures,” crafted humorous, hybrid ceramic sculptures from existing pieces. He was featured in Hi-Fructose Vol. 34 and was last featured on our site here.