by Andy SmithPosted on

Moving between works on paper and ceramics, Cathy Lu explores cultural identity and traditional Chinese art in her work. Many of her pieces contain dozens of young female characters, scaling classical vases and metaphoric lifeforms. The artist offers some insight into what she’s traversing in her work:

by Andy SmithPosted on


The ceramic sculptures of Hitomi Murakami tether humanity to nature in a way that appears both elegant and chilling. Her figures grow from vegetation and are consumed by it, exposed and writhing. Works such as “Land of Root,” in contrast, seem more connected to wonder.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Allison Schulnik’s textured paintings move between stirring and ominous scenes and more surreal characters. The denseness of her process gives her paintings a sculptural quality. Study of each work reveals several layers and intrigue.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Mary O’Malley‘s recent ceramic work appears as a dining set salvaged from wreckage scattered along the seafloor. In her current show at Arch Enemy Arts, “A Seat at the Table,” her work is presented as a full-room installation in which a dining service is set. At the artist’s hands, porcelain, glaze, and gold become a convincing display of the organic overtaking high-class artifacts.

by Andy SmithPosted on

William Kidd‘s ceramic sculptures imagine lifeforms that don’t exist in our world. The artist attributes the particularly organic appearance of his pieces to “the choice of a low-fire red earthenware clay which is then finished using oxide stains, underglazes, and my signature crawl glaze.” He says that those materials allow the richness and natural vibrancy of his work to shine.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Wesley Wright’s ceramic sculptures explore our relationship to the natural world, in both its corruption and beauty. In his “Primates” series, in specific, the artist’s talents knack for surprising details in the contours of his subjects shines. The artist, based in Northern California, works primarily in stoneware clay.