by Andy SmithPosted on

The elaborate distortions created by Hong Kong-based sculptor Johnson Tsang continue to evolve, with a recent showing at Giant Year Gallery of works from his “Lucid Dream” series. Tsang was last mentioned on HiFructose.com here, and he was recently featured in Hi-Fructose Vol. 46.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Toshiya Masuda’s ceramic sculptures simulate the building blocks of pixels, creating everyday objects. The Japanese artist has been pursuing this fascination for several years with works that appear to be ripped from a classic 8-bit video game, predating Minecraft’s bolstering of the aesthetic.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Genesis Belanger‘s ceramic sculptures take everyday objects and inject a strange strain of humanity into them. The works, often mixing stoneware and porcelain, carry both humor and surrealism in this active evolution. All are so vivid and burlesque in their execution that they appear to be ripped out of an animated world.

by Andy SmithPosted on


Natalia Arbelaez’s figures, often built with clay, carry both humor and sadness in their strange forms. Her white ceramic sculptures, in particular, offer texture and personality that feel at once human and something subterranean. The Miami-born Colombian-American artist has excited her pieces across the U.S.

by Andy SmithPosted on

In Erika Sanada’s “Cover My Eyes,” running through July 30 at Modern Eden Gallery in San Francisco, viewers find a new batch of ceramic sculptures from the Japanese artist. Sanada’s “dogs” typically feature at least one physical mutation and represent ongoing anxieties in the artist’s life. She explains the addition of new animals this time around: “The rats and birds present with the dogs are further extensions of myself and my fears. Birds, like my anxieties, are difficult to contain and control, and are always a part of me and my work.” The artist was featured in Hi-Fructose Vol. 31.

by Deianira TolemaPosted on

Malaysian artist Umibaizurah Mahir’s meticulously crafted ceramics are almost exclusively in the form of stylized, comical creatures, like three dimensional hand-made cartoons. The complex psychology of her collectible “toys for adults” places them at the intersection of man, society and nature, where nothing is what it seems. Like Collodi’s “Pinocchio”, these naughty objects are often on the run, trying to escape on hand-painted ceramic wheels and wings, climbing their pedestals or breaking out of their frames.