by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Berkeley painter Deth P. Sun’s work, taken a whole, can be read almost like a comic book. With each solo show, his blank-eyed cat character — whom longtime fans have come to know well — returns for new adventures. Coming up on April 25, the artist has a solo show at Grumpy Bert in Brooklyn titled “Being and Nothingness.” This time, his mystical feline tackles themes of global proportions. Set against a backdrop of a star-lit sky, Sun places the microcosm of his protagonist’s world in the larger context of the universe. Amid the endearing visuals are bouts of melancholy as our hero ultimately must face his own mortality. “Being and Nothingness” will be on view through May 24.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

David Spriggs uses a combinations of acrylic paint and transparent plastic sheets to create sculptural installations with images floating within them. Spriggs divides his abstract designs into layers and paints them one by one until they accumulate into an illusory final product. His work focuses on radiating patterns that evoke various cosmic phenomena. With his strategic use of lighting, the nebulas come to life and appear to levitate before the viewer.

by Ysabelle CheungPosted on

If there’s anyone whose work could convey the experience of tetrachromacy, it’s Markus Linnenbrink. The multi-disciplinary artist’s trippy installations and paintings might take those with average vision closer to experiencing a condition where the affected see millions more colors on the spectrum than most human beings. However, Linnenbrink’s drips and strips of colors aren’t a result of a biological condition but rather an aesthetic preference (besides, tetrachromacy only affects women).

by Elizabeth MaskaskyPosted on

German-born collage artist Thomas Spieler creates intriguing multimedia works that play with the dualism that exists between the human and natural worlds. Spieler juxtaposes vintage black-and-white photographs of human figures with brightly colored photographs of more abstract forms. Many of the black-and-white photos look like they could be ads or pictures of movie stars lifted from old magazines, while others appear to be photographs of classical sculptures from antiquity. Meanwhile, the colorful photos are of objects found in nature, such as minerals, geological formations, butterfly wings and flower petals.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Drawing and performance art are rarely seen as complementary media, but Ethan Murrow’s large-scale graphite drawings begin as performance collaborations with his wife, Vita Weinstein Murrow. The two began working together in 2004 and the source imagery they gather for their videos often inspires Murrow’s detail-oriented works on paper. His drawings come with the heavy feeling of the aftermath of disaster.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Italian artist and designer Andrea Minini makes a living creating brand logos and graphics, but as a personal project the artist recently created the “Animals in Moire” series. A collection of black-and-white digital illustrations, the works take inspiration from the animal kingdom. But the shapes in these portraits of peacocks and pumas are anything but organic. Uniform curves outline the contours of he animals’ faces. The creatures become abstracted and almost architectural, defined by mathematically-plotted shapes. The high-contrast, monochromatic patterns create the illusion of depth and dimension, yet the forms appear hollow and mask-like. Take a look at the fun series after the jump.