by CaroPosted on

The shape of a church is indefinitely sketched into the landscape in the latest project by architecture duo, Gijs Van Vaerenbergh. Comprised of Belgian architects Pieterjan Gijs and Arnout Van Vaerenbergh, their series of see-through churches, “Reading Between the Lines,” are not intended to be functional as shelter. They are more like sculptures that borrow design inspiration from local churches’ architecture in the area. See more after the jump!

by Annie OwensPosted on

Going through Randy Hage’s “New York Storefronts” series of photographs had me admiring them as photographs for all the reasons you admire a great photograph; color, composition, a story… until I read the captions: “1/12th scale sculpture of a bodega in Brooklyn…” These storefront miniatures could be thought of as time capsules of a potentially endangered species, capturing the delicate beauty of aging architecture. Hage has been creating sets, models, and props for the TV/Film and small scale hobby industries for over 25 years and has an upcoming solo show at Flower Pepper gallery October 10th, 2015.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Lebanese photographer Serge Najjar notices geometric patterns in his day-to-day surroundings. Based in Beirut, his photographs capture instances of minimalist architecture with an emphasis on symmetry and repetition. But despite its focus on clean designs, his work includes evidence of human inhabitants in these austere edifices. With people peaking out of their doors and windows, the buildings come alive. The people in his work add individuality and quirkiness to his otherwise highly stylized presentation of Beirut, where cultural context is stripped away to highlight the city’s modern, architectural elements.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

In 2013, Australian architecture firm Studio505 completed the Lotus Building, a community center set atop an artificial lake in Wujin, China. The city government commissioned the sculptural building to serve as a public park and multi-use space with exhibition and conference rooms that are open to the public. The building extends two stories under water and visitors must enter it from below and ascend to a cathedral-like peek with large windows that allow for plenty of natural light. A creative architectural creation, the Lotus Building is a modern-day landmark in an age when architecture is typically minimalistic and functional.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Interested in the intersection between tech and architecture, interdisciplinary design studio Loop.pH (composed of Mathias Gmachl and Rachel Wingfield) creates interactive, site-specific installations that allow the public to engage with budding technologies and scientific concepts in novel ways. One of their latest works, “Atmeture,” was on view at the Letchworth Fire & Fright Festival, which took place on October 28 through November 6 in Letchworth, UK. “Atmeture” invited viewers to walk through an illuminated, porous tunnel in which fibers inflated and deflated with a breath-like motion. Though a bright, visual spectacle on the outside, the breathing work of art fostered a calming, meditative space in its interior.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Alex Chinneck is frequently praised as an architectural wizard for his unusual interventions, which he creates with the help of engineering experts and legions of volunteers. In 2013, he transformed a multi-story home in Margate, UK into a steep slope that resembled a skate ramp (see our coverage here). Earlier this year, he made Covent Garden’s Market Building levitate, creating the illusion of the 184-year-old edifice floating off its foundation. For his most recent work, Chinneck built a brick house made entirely out of realistic, wax parts for London’s Merge Festival. The piece, titled “A Pound of flesh for 50p,” was put up in early October and left to endure the elements. Over the course of the past few weeks, the house has perplexed passersby as it melted and collapsed. Chinneck recently tweeted a photo of the house in its current state. Take a look at the melting house’s progress below.