by CaroPosted on

Diana Al-Hadid once described her work as “impossible architecture”, created by embracing her gut instinct and seeing where it takes her. The Brooklyn based, Syrian born artist’s work can be difficult to describe, monumental and ethereal mixed media works with a myriad of references throughout art history: her captivating installations, sculptures and paintings feature elements of figures from the Renaissance and classical imagery, forms that appear to be disintegrating into a “dripping” tower.

by Abby Lynn KlinkenbergPosted on

Specializing in the Japanese art form of paper architecture, Amsterdam-based artist Ingrid Siliakus creates incredibly detailed architectural masterpieces from single pieces of paper. In order to achieve a final result with the complexity and beauty that she intends, Siliakus may produce anywhere from 20 to over 30 prototypes: “Paper architecture does not bare haste, it is its enemy,” she says. “One moment of loss of concentration can lead to failure of a piece.”

by CaroPosted on

Making art wasn’t the only creative outlet for Penland based sculptor Dustin Farnsworth growing up. His high school drama program helped instill in him an affinity for the theatrical: his sculptures feature mixed media figures and life sized heads adorned with headdresses that resemble theaters and architectural spaces. Also the son of a carpenter, his father, who built marionettes and a medical illustrator, his mother, it would seem that his work is the perfect combination of his upbringing.

by CaroPosted on

Originally hailing from Germany, New York based artist Daniel Rich creates meticulous acrylic paintings of an empty, man-made world. Although completely devoid of human presence, his paintings are not without character. Rich chooses to celebrate the rich vibrancy and design of architectural structures, which appear smooth, intricate and appealing. The absence of people also brings out an eerie quiet and calm to what should be bustling urban cities. They are failed utopias- Rich’s ideas about what the future of human civilization could look like.

by Roxanne GoldbergPosted on

Based in Marseille, French artist Etienne Rey creates sculptures and installations using light and mirrors. His site-specific installations respond to their physical spaces, creating unique situations. Rey’s sculptures alter the conditions of their environments, changing, reflecting and refracting the light and sense of space. Motivated by a curiosity about the consciousness and science of direct experience, Rey uses his artworks to question and reveal the intricacies of human interaction and organization. As moving objects, Rey’s sculptures are also bodies in space and one must negotiate how to move among these objects in the same way one approaches or avoids other persons.

by CaroPosted on

The shape of a church is indefinitely sketched into the landscape in the latest project by architecture duo, Gijs Van Vaerenbergh. Comprised of Belgian architects Pieterjan Gijs and Arnout Van Vaerenbergh, their series of see-through churches, “Reading Between the Lines,” are not intended to be functional as shelter. They are more like sculptures that borrow design inspiration from local churches’ architecture in the area. See more after the jump!