by Andy SmithPosted on

Eric Wong’s vision of “a truly United Kingdom” is conveyed in the project “Cohesion.” Wong, a graduate of the Bartlett School of Architecture, UCL, crafts a response to the Rockefeller Foundation’s challenge to 100 cities to build stronger and more inclusive economies for the good of all.

by Andy SmithPosted on


Vasco Mourao, who goes by the moniker Mister Mourao, describes himself as “an architect turned into an artist with a tendency for obsessive drawing.” In his new series, “Ouroborus,” he combines mediums for renderings of buildings that flow in continuous loops. These structures neither begin nor end, offering countless points of entry.

by Andy SmithPosted on


Scott Tulay is an artist and architect based in Amherst, Mass., crafting ghostly drawings that play with light, shadow, and a distorted version of familiar structures. Tulay’s command of space and design bring an engrossing order to his otherwise otherworldly creations. And whether it’s ink, charcoal, pastel, graphite, or a combination of all, his drawings offer vibrant arrangements that loom like vivid apparitions.

by CaroPosted on

People complain a lot about Los Angeles: It’s too big, too spread out, and the traffic is terrible. But local artist Susan Logoreci sees a different side of her city that she conveys in her large-scale mosaic-like colored pencil drawings. Her images of the urban sprawl are drawn by hand and without a ruler or projector, giving her work a hand-made or in her words, “elastic”, quality that breaks the first rule of drawing architecture.

by CaroPosted on

Diana Al-Hadid once described her work as “impossible architecture”, created by embracing her gut instinct and seeing where it takes her. The Brooklyn based, Syrian born artist’s work can be difficult to describe, monumental and ethereal mixed media works with a myriad of references throughout art history: her captivating installations, sculptures and paintings feature elements of figures from the Renaissance and classical imagery, forms that appear to be disintegrating into a “dripping” tower.

by Abby Lynn KlinkenbergPosted on

Specializing in the Japanese art form of paper architecture, Amsterdam-based artist Ingrid Siliakus creates incredibly detailed architectural masterpieces from single pieces of paper. In order to achieve a final result with the complexity and beauty that she intends, Siliakus may produce anywhere from 20 to over 30 prototypes: “Paper architecture does not bare haste, it is its enemy,” she says. “One moment of loss of concentration can lead to failure of a piece.”