by Andy SmithPosted on

Benjamin Sack draws imaginary cityscapes that recall historical metropolitans and motifs that have graced the Earth for millennia. His hyperdetailed approach not only shows a command of varying structural textures but also a power over perspective. (Sack was last featured on HiFructose.com here.)

by Andy SmithPosted on

Matias Bechtold uses cardboard, plastics, and objects found around a home to erect intricate cityscapes. One of the most dazzling aspects of Bechtold’s work is how he’s able to use packaging materials and even vacuum cleaners to create texturally convincing skylines. In an architectural sense, the artist is also playing with what’s possible within the future of that industry.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Michael Jantzen‘s “Mysterious Monuments” series of public art proposals have no actual meaning behind them, but are designed “to inspire stories in the minds of the visitors about the meaning behind the construction.” The designer is known for blending elements of architecture with sustainable design and fine art. The status of this series, in particular, is unfortunately “unbuilt.”

by Andy SmithPosted on

Stranger Things

Illustrator/architect Boryana Ilieva recreates the floor plans of her favorite films and TV shows, labeled as a “poetic survey of cinematic architecture.” The project is called “Floor Plan Croissant,” and began three years ago, when the Bulgaria-based artist began “walking backwards the process path of the production designers in films.” Using the structures and architecture provided, she creates a logical floorplan.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Decktwo’s absorbing drawings combine influences from architecture and an organic energy that powers urban environments. Thomas Dartigues is the actual name of the artist, who is a former street artist who switched to crafting massive works in markers. Decktwo is based in Paris.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Portland illustrator Song Kang blends architecture and natural structures in both her intensely detailed drawings and her absorbing sculptures. The latter even uses the inherent forms of the animal kingdom as foundations for her designs. The “Vernacular” series has works created from wood, paper mache, plaster, fiber, recyclables, and other materials.