by Andy SmithPosted on

More than 20 artists participate in the Painted Prosthetic Project, which raises money to assist homeless and wounded veterans. A gallery show, kicking off on Jan. 6, displays the works–created on prosthetic legs– before they’re auctioned off online at the end of the month. The gallery hosting the show is Arch Enemy Arts, which is based in Philadelphia. After the end of the run there, the pieces are shipped to Orlando to be auctioned off.

by CaroPosted on

As the saying goes, “the best things come in small packages”. Philadelphia gallery Arch Enemy Arts has challenged artists to create their smallest works to date for their annual group show, “Small Wonders”. For its fourth installment in a row, “Small Wonders 4” features over 75 small pieces by artists from all over the world, including 64 Colors, Alex Garant, Brian Mashburn, Caitlin Hackett, Caitlin McCormack, Craww, Hanna Jaeun, Maria Teicher, Matthew Greskiewicz, and many more. As with previous showings, all the work is sized under 12 inches.

by CaroPosted on

Hyper-realist painter Maria Teicher, featured here, likens the experience of being an artist to being in high school. As a student, she felt like an outcast who didn’t quite fit in, a “loner” forced into an artificial social dynamic. Teicher explores this theme in per paintings, which portray people in powerless moments, often wrapped in “veils” that distort their faces. Her work almost stops your breath, not only for her impressive use of the oil medium, but because you can feel the moment of constriction. For her latest body of work “Here Together, So Alone” at Arch Enemy Arts in Philadelphia, Teicher observes how we group ourselves together as humans while remaining inexplicably alone.

by CaroPosted on

Canadian sculptor Troy Coulterman, first featured in Hi-Fructose Vol. 27, creates colorful and surprisingly illustrative figures. Working mostly with resin and steel painted with acrylic, Coulterman’s works enhance the quirkiness of every day people. For his current exhibition at Arch Enemy Arts gallery in Philadelphia, “Full Disclosure”, Coulterman attaches geometric shapes to his subjects. In his show statement, he explains the meaning behind these strange appendages: “I chose these basic shapes because they are loaded with symbolism and have various meanings throughout different cultures. A triangle can represent future, truth or intellect, a circle can represent present, perfection or emotion and a square can represent past, destiny or beauty. Depending on who the viewer is these shapes can hold different meanings and that’s what drew them to me.”

by CaroPosted on

The bell rings, school is out for summer, but you’re heading straight to the library to pick up your summer reading list. Sound familiar? The famous list was designed by American schools to keep children engaged in reading throughout the summer, including classics like “The Secret Garden”, “Of Mice and Men”, and “A Wrinkle in Time”. Some titles have even raised concerns among parents and others that students are being exposed to material that is overly grim. For the 20 participating artists in “Summer Reading List,” now on view at Arch Enemy Arts in Philadelphia, these books are not only a part of their childhood, but continue to provide their artwork with inspiration.

by CaroPosted on

Toronto-based KiSung Koh’s lifelong enchantment with the wild is evident in his entire body of work. His images (previously featured here) of realistic animals in dreamy environments, primarily in oil on wood or canvas, are painted in tribute to them. Born and raised in a small town in South Korea, Koh has been surrounded by nature from early in his life. At his website, he recalls a moment from his childhood that changed the way he looked at animals forever: “While having a nice walk, I had a chance to see a deer family very close. I can’t explain how I felt at the time because it’s unspeakable. It was just truly amazing. It’s probably easier to say that I saw not only deer, but also beautiful spirits around them.” Read more after the jump.