by CaroPosted on

Tokyo based collective known as teamLab describe themselves as “ultra-technologists”, artists who seek to merge art, technology and design in their work, designed to allow viewers to have a more personal and unique connection with art. With Japanese designer Toshiyuki Inoko at the helm, the collective’s installations are nothing short of magical- featured here on our blog, they are a spontaneous experience where artworks come to “life” as animation when approached by visitors. The secret to the magic behind their work is motion sensors that pick up the viewer’s movements, prompting paintings of the natural world to become a blooming and wilting garden of delights. Pace Art + Technology in Silicon Valley, California, seeking to create an environment that encourages educational play, invited teamLab to join their Future Park series- the result of which is “Living Digital Space and Future Parks” opening on February 6th.

by CaroPosted on

To the world, Salvador Dalí was an eccentric Surrealist and animation pioneer Walt Disney was a notorious dreamer. But to each other, they were fierce friends and collaborators. Although the unlikely pair grew up worlds apart, they found one another through their art, and their work together has endured long after their lifetime. The history of this remarkable friendship between two icons is explored in a new exhibition titled “Disney and Dalí: Architects of the Imagination” at The Walt Disney Family Museum in San Francisco.

by CaroPosted on

The world is like one giant movie screen for São Paulo-based artist duo Ceci Soloaga and Ygor Marotta, aka “VJ Suave”. The two have fused interactive technology with street art, using custom-fitted tricycles called “Suaveciclos” that carry speakers and projector equipment. VJ Suave describe their work as “digital graffiti”, created mainly with an application called Tagtool which allows them to edit and play their whimsical animations in real-time.

by Roxanne GoldbergPosted on

In Tabaimo‘s worlds, nothing is as ordinary as it appears. Light bulbs morph into moons, walls dissolve, and trees turn into snakes. These eldritch environments capture the viewer who stands at the center, and transports him into an unknown underbelly of the everyday. The artist achieves a totaling effect by manipulating architectural elements and allowing hand-drawn animations that reference both Japanese manga and traditional Edo-period prints, to organically bleed out of the two-dimensional plane and into the exhibition space. The result is a pseudo-theater where the viewer is the main actor among anthropomorphic objects and a cast of characters, whose interplay raises social, political, and gendered topics of contemporary import.

by CaroPosted on

British artist Mat Collishaw creates compelling, often morbid multi-layered pieces in a variety of media. In recent years, he has perhaps garnered the most attention from his monumental zoetropes that bring dark fantasies to life. His most recent, “All Things Fall”, is based on on the 17th century painting “Massacre of the Innocents” by Flemish Baroque painter Peter Paul Reubens. It is an impeccable, 3D-printed piece of work that took six months to complete in collaboration with fellow animator Sebastian Burdon. See more after the jump!

by CaroPosted on

Japan based artist Ryota Nishioka airbrushes elaborate cityscapes of imaginary buildings. His process matches those of animation background artists, tasked with creating a believable backdrop for subjects based in a fantasy world. Similarly, Nishioka renders his paintings with layer upon layer of acrylic paint and pencil work on paper. Each layer takes only a matter of minutes to complete, making the final piece even more extraordinary. In almost hyperrealistic form, he draws his favorite subject, “moving things”, like clouds, ripples of water and scattered leaves from inorganic trees.