by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Japanese sculptor Masao Kinoshita is prolific in a variety of media — wood, clay, plaster, bronze, stone. His works take an interest in the extreme physical feats of the human anatomy and add to these feats with fantastical details culled from folklore, mythology and religion. A prominent series in Konishita’s body of work is his muscle sculpture series, which exposes what lies beneath a creature’s skin. Much like the “Bodies” exhibit that toured across American museums, the sculpture series displays the intricacies of our flesh.

by Soojin ChangPosted on

Without all of the clothes and the accessories of the modern Homo sapiens, human anatomy alone is quite strange and our smug arrogance, rather misplaced. Visualize a baby kitten next to a human infant, and you’ll see how oafish we must appear to surrounding species. New York-based artist Aurel Schmidt goes a step further to highlight our physical oddities by comparing human body parts to not even others mammals, but vegetation, in her collections of drawings titled “Fruits” and “Black Drawings.”

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Illustrator Kate Lacour describes her work with three words: “body horror beauty.” More silly than terrifying, her “Bodies” series of drawings remixes factual textbook-style anatomy diagrams, transforming the make-up of the human body into kaleidoscopic arrangements of limbs and organs. Lacour achieves visually pleasing symmetrical compositions through strange juxtapositions of parts. In one piece, the musculature of two faces intertwines like an infinity symbol, nestled inside a female pelvis that has been opened up for view. In others, she incorporates Buddhist imagery (the lotus position, open-palmed hand gestures) — perhaps to show that these bodies shouldn’t inspire fear but rather expose a new perspective on the structures we take for granted.