by Andy SmithPosted on

Keya Tama is a South African artist who says he aims to “reunite old and new through contrasting yet unified iconography.” Tama’s talent for crafting interlocking creatures, either in the backgrounds of his paintings or in the form of murals, also recalls the work of M.C. Escher. Recently, the Los Angeles-based artist has also been collaborating with others in his pieces, such as the work with Caratoes at the jump.

by Andy SmithPosted on

In the upcoming show “Dramaholics,” Mexican painter José Rodolfo Loaiza Ontiveros takes the taboos of reality and injects them into the idealized world of Disney. The show, running Dec. 6-29 at La Luz de Jesus Gallery in Los Angeles, offers new acrylic and oil works from the artist. Ontiveros was last featured on HiFructose.com here.

by Andy SmithPosted on

The twin brothers who work under the moniker “Perez Bros” were first exposed to the car culture of Los Angeles in their youth, and to this day, it informs their collaborative painting practice. Their current show at Thinkspace Projects, titled “Cruise Night(Office),” collects some of their recent auto-filled scenes. It runs through the end of the month at the space.

by Andy SmithPosted on


Each of Andrea Joyce Heimer’s acrylic paintings begins as a written story. Even if the viewer isn’t able to know every detail of her narratives, the painter’s work gives us the chance to piece her myths ourselves. The artist offers some personal reasons why this process is so integral to her practice:

by Andy SmithPosted on

In Oliver Vernon’s new abstract works at an upcoming KIRK Gallery show, the artist abandons collage entirely and pushes his work forward only using acrylics. “Brushing Away the Veil,” starting on Nov. 2, represents a new body of work and direction for the Brooklynite. There’s another new component to the works, as well, as Vernon says “is the excavation of buried paint layers through sanding. Since many of these pieces have had numerous stages of accumulation, they were like gold mines of hidden color.”

by Andy SmithPosted on

Gregory Ferrand’s cinematic paintings, often laced with anachronisms, speak to a broader sense of isolation belonging to an otherwise social species. The artist’s academic background in film is evident throughout his works, with a full-frame attention to mood and detail. Among the artist’s other influences: Mexican muralists, comic books, and quite evident below, a mid-19th-century aesthetic.