by Andy SmithPosted on

Hideyuki Katsumata’s wild paintings and drawings blend centuries of Japanese motifs, pop elements, and more otherworldly elements. The Tokyo native produces an array of work outside of his paintings, from soft toys and enamel pins to massive murals and show designs. The artist was last featured on our site here.

by Andy SmithPosted on

In Louie Cordero’s surreal and riveting paintings, the artist’s command of texture and mood sets his work apart. Cordero, hailing from the Philippines, is currently featured in a group show at Gallery Poulsen titled “Inoperative Halo,” along with painter Eric White and sculptor Jud Bergeron. (The show runs through Dec. 21 at the Copenhagen venue.)

by Andy SmithPosted on

The paintings of Jean Paul Langlois blend memories of 1970s sci-fi and Westerns of his youth, while also exploring the artist’s connection to his own native and non-native roots. Within his Old West scenes, you may also see a character from “Planet of the Apes” or references to Saturday morning cartoons. His “Origin Stories” series, in particular, re-imagines “mundane family stories and re-interpreting them through a cinematic lens.”

by Andy SmithPosted on

Keya Tama is a South African artist who says he aims to “reunite old and new through contrasting yet unified iconography.” Tama’s talent for crafting interlocking creatures, either in the backgrounds of his paintings or in the form of murals, also recalls the work of M.C. Escher. Recently, the Los Angeles-based artist has also been collaborating with others in his pieces, such as the work with Caratoes at the jump.

by Andy SmithPosted on

In the upcoming show “Dramaholics,” Mexican painter José Rodolfo Loaiza Ontiveros takes the taboos of reality and injects them into the idealized world of Disney. The show, running Dec. 6-29 at La Luz de Jesus Gallery in Los Angeles, offers new acrylic and oil works from the artist. Ontiveros was last featured on HiFructose.com here.

by Andy SmithPosted on

The twin brothers who work under the moniker “Perez Bros” were first exposed to the car culture of Los Angeles in their youth, and to this day, it informs their collaborative painting practice. Their current show at Thinkspace Projects, titled “Cruise Night(Office),” collects some of their recent auto-filled scenes. It runs through the end of the month at the space.