by Andy SmithPosted on

The interdimensional creatures painted by Nosego return in a new show at Philadelphia’s Paradigm Gallery. “Died a Few Times to Live This Once” collects new work from the Philly artist, whose real name is Yis Goodwin and was last mentioned on HiFructose.com here. His sprawling works, as usual carry “themes of boundlessness.”

by Andy SmithPosted on

Painter Rodel Tapaya ties the current social climate of the Philippines to the mythology of the past. In a recent show at Tang Contemporary, Tapaya offered new paintings with “Myths and Truths.” The surrealist images touch on evironmental and political images, in a variety of scales in this recent body of work.

by Andy SmithPosted on

James Guppy’s recent acrylic paintings on fabric, juxtaposing floral arrangements and contemporary businessmen, play with “the history of paint and value.” The artist showed his recent body of work in a run at Jan Murphy Gallery, titled “The Venal Garden.” Though absurdist initially in appearance, the works have a specific historical consideration.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Chen Fei’s sharp acrylic paintings carry dark humor and allusions to art history. The China native’s crisp linework borrows from pop art and comic book sensibilities, yet much of these references harken back to centuries-old work. And much of the work carries the artist’s own figure, rendered in both graceful and shameful situations.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Avery Singer’s acrylic paintings blend abstract and figurative sensibilities, with a process that’s just as diverse. Her underdrawing is crafted using 3D software, and then, the artist applies the traditional material over that framework. In the past, much of her work has been grayscaled, though her recent experimentations with color offer new life to this style.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Using acrylics, black gesso, gold leaf, and wood, Tenmyouya Hisashi calls upon the history of Japanese painting in narratives and creations that span the past, present, and future. These works render a robotic transport with the same elegance of centuries-old weaponry. His sweeping battles scenes and portraits function under the banner of his “Neo Nihonga” style.