by Andy SmithPosted on

Justin Lim’s recent acrylic and enamel paintings convene symbols of both nature’s beauty and manmade destruction. The dominant aspect of each work, whether a mushroom cloud or floral arrangement, is only a point of entry for a work that reveals itself as critiquing multiple concepts at a time.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Long Beach artist Alex Gardner creates acrylic scenes with ink-black figures set against pastel backdrops. The artist intends to “de-inviduate and universalize” with this approach toward his subjects, one statement says. Part of the work’s excellence is found in its subtly, playfully reflecting and juxtaposing texture and color. The artist wouldn’t use the phase “surrealist” in this scenes, instead reflecting widely relatable themes in his work.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Jesse Jacobi’s massive, forested scenes are packed with creatures and ruins, each a dive into a dreamlike, yet vivid world. The vibrant acrylic works make use of camouflage and show seemingly alien civilizations. And on the time and place shown in this works, the artist admit it’s not clear, “but the setting is, I can say with certainty, very far removed from modernity and anything involving current times.”

by Andy SmithPosted on


Naoto Hattori‘s creatures are both vivid and dreamlike, rendered in vibrant acrylics. The Japan-born artist creates absorbing work teeming with innocence. Each bends expectation and reality into beings alternate between disconcerting and ambrosial. Hattori was last mentioned on HiFructose.com here.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Robert Proch, an artist and animator based in Poland, created kinetic, seemingly erratic worlds in his paintings. Influences in the artist’s style include contemporary street art and graffiti, impressionism, and even “classic caricature.”

by Andy SmithPosted on

Japanese manga artist Junko Mizuno depicts the “Seven Lucky Gods,” a once-disparate group of deities that became a unit through Japanese art history, in a new show at Alhambra, Calif.’s Gallery Nucleus. Although not traditionally this way, “Takarabune” transforms all of these gods of fortune into women, translated in Mizuno’s vibrant style. The show runs through Jan. 8 at the gallery. Mizuno was last featured on HiFructose.com here.