by Andy SmithPosted on

Over the past few years, many of Ivy Haledeman’s intimate paintings have focused on an anthropomorphic female hot dog character. The character bends and lounges across the canvas, often extending most of its form out of our view. While surely offering more erotic themes to extract, Haldedeman’s paintings also seem to be offering reflections on the capitalistic system that produces “hot dogs” themselves.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Jamian Juliano-Villani, known for stirring acrylic paintings packed with dark humor and sprawling references, offers new works in a show at Massimo De Carlo London titled “Let’s Kill Nicole.” She offers both new paintings and sculptures in the display, which runs through Sept. 21. Juliano-Villani’s work is known for pulling in a variety of familiar imagery from fashion, illustration, and other industries, with conversations emerging over what constitutes referencing versus appropriation. “Everything is a reference,” she’s insisted.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Jason Limon, whose striking paintings play with the macabre and typography, offers new acrylic works on panel next month in a show at Copro Gallery in Santa Monica. Kicking off on Aug. 10 and running through Aug. 31, “Signs of Life” is at once playful and riveting, in the artist’s knack for conveying perspective and depth.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Iran-born painter Arghavan Khosravi creates surreal scenes that blend historical Persian motifs and pop cultural iconography. The artist’s own statement says that she is “deeply connected to her own personal experience of the culture and politics of her homeland of Iran that probe both personal and political experiences.” Much of her recent work has been crafted as acrylic on found textiles.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Colin Prahl’s intricate landscapes move between circuitry-like forms and psychedelia, each acrylic painting a wild display of illusion and vibrancy. From afar, the structures and contours contained within his works resemble urban environments.

by Andy SmithPosted on

There’s a shapeshifting quality to the paintings Ricardo Estrada, whose subjects are physically inhabited by cultural iconography. The Los Angeles native specifically focuses on Chicano culture, whether in his murals or acrylic paintings. Each carries intricate brushwork that allows Estrada to transition between differing textures and planes of reality.