by Andy SmithPosted on

French artist Nicolas Barrome’s wild, cartoonish scenes play with texture and expectation. He does this both on the canvas and on walls, with each piece tethered by Barrome’s rendering of cutesy characters and objects alongside darker elements. In a statement, the artist’s swirling influences are given some context.

by Andy SmithPosted on


Kenne Grégoire, a painter often associated with the movement New Dutch Realism, moves between still-life paintings and more surreal scenes that capture a humane sadness and other complex emotions, rendered in acrylics. The artist uses techniques derived from the 17th century, yet he approaches his work in a way that pushes the form, twisting perspective and hues to create ambiguous points of view and situations.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Hell’O, also known as Hell’O Monsters, is a collective of Belgian artists who use individual talents to create work within a cohesive, bizarre fictional world. The trio was born out of Jerôme Meynen, François Dieltiens, and Antoine Detaille meeting in the 1990s, and they populate their works with hybrid beasts taking part in both humorous and bleak narrative scenes. The works shown below are examples of the group’s acrylic paintings.

by CaroPosted on

Edinburg based artist Sarah Muirhead (covered here) portrays every day people in her mottled, figurative acrylic paintings. The watercolor-like quality of her art lends to her keen observations of the body and skin tones. Muirhead elaborates on her style choice in her artist statement: “The quality of flesh, its contrasting textures and tensions, the density and potential of muscle and the irregularity and dimples in fatty tissue are important in the way I want to describe any given subject. I want the bodies I paint to be a strange mixture of lurid, glistening attraction and true empathic realism avoiding elegant cliches.” She continues her unique exploration of the figure in “Bonded,” which opens today at Leyden Gallery in London.