by Andy SmithPosted on

Shawn Huckins combines Internet culture and 18th- and 19th- century style portraits in his work. He offers a new collection of large acrylic paintings in “Athenaeum (I Can’t Pretend That This Is Poetry,” an upcoming show at Seattle’s Foster/White Gallery. The artist was featured in Hi-Fructose Vol. 32, and he was last featured on HiFructose.com here.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Amy Casey’s acrylic paintings take elements of the urban landscape and creates monstrosities and hulking, twisted versions of the city. Her newest works are collected in show at Zg Gallery in Chicago titled “Critical Mass.” The paintings in this show highlight the artist’s talent for engrossing detail and controlled chaos. The show kicks off this weekend.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Wiley Wallace creates surreal acrylic paintings that hint at sci-fi concepts and fantastical new layers within reality. Wallace’s latest work carries some of the youthful elements of his past work, yet interweaves darker, stranger elements. Thinkspace Gallery says the artist has a “metaphysical interest in surreal worlds and pseudo-science fiction themes.”

by Andy SmithPosted on

Brandi Milne’s pop-surrealist, acrylic paintings are both sweet and strange, each a peek into the artist’s modern-day and childhood influences. A new body of work “Once Upon a Quiet Kingdom,” is collected in a show at Corey Helford Gallery in Los Angeles, which kicked off on Saturday. This is her fourth solo exhibition.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Josh Keyes further pushes his signature “eco-surrealism” with a new collection of acrylic paintings under the title “Implosion.” The new show at Thinkspace Gallery takes us to a post-human time, a bleak reality in which the natural world goes on despite the chaos we wreaked upon it. In this world, human artifacts and even animals are adorned with graffiti, our final communication with a planet we put in peril.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Calgary-born, Los Angeles-based artist/graphic designer Geoff McFetridge deconstructs everyday images and reimagines them in simpler, yet captivating studies. He uses elements of logo design and commercial inspiration to create these acrylic paintings. McFetridge was last mentioned on HiFructose.com here.