by CaroPosted on

Throughout his career, Franco Fasoli aka JAZ has treated his work as a search for identity, primarily between his native Argentina and Mexico. He represents a mix of cultures in motifs like masks, football, popular rituals and clashes between opposing parties, as in his mural about the 2014 Iguala Mass Kidnapping. This sort of confrontation is the main theme of his solo show, “CHOQUE” (English: “Collision”) now on view at Celaya Brothers Gallery in Mexico City. His exhibit offers different interpretations of this idea through culture, beliefs, ideals, and artistic techniques.

by CaroPosted on

Pablo Picasso once said, “There is no abstract art. You must always start with something. Afterward you can remove all traces of reality.” And while art has evolved dramatically, the classic fundamental of anatomy remains the same. Czech sculptor Monika Horčicová creates ornate installations with polyester resin skeletons as her medium. Some might call her work morbid, others a beautiful reimagining and application of the human form. Her technique requires a keen understanding of anatomy before she can manipulate it- and her work is not just an abstraction. She’s walking a line between natural construction and purely artistic expression. Take a look after the jump!

by CaroPosted on

German urban artist Katharina Grosse doesn’t limit her vibrant artworks to a wall- she colors the world around her. Color is absolutely essential to her graffiti that covers buildings, mounds of dirt, and installations that evoke natural wonders like the Northern Lights. Her strokes don’t follow the contours of the chosen environment. They follow that of her own hand as she moves through the space, telling an abstract, emotional narrative. If it looks as though she hovered over the Earth with a spray gun, you would be right. Grosse’s process often involves dangerously leaning over scaffolding or being suspended from a crane. Throughout her career, her materials have varied from the conventional to unconventional; acrylic on canvas paintings and gallery walls to plastic and styrofoam alien-like formations. See more of her work after the jump.

by CaroPosted on

Japanese artist Yukino Fukumoto’s emotional and transparent watercolor paintings seem to dissapear into a spectrum of cool hues. A young graduate of Japan’s prestigious Tama Art University, she is virtually new to the international gallery scene having only been exhibiting for a couple years. Her work can recently be seen alongside Hikari Shimoda (featured in Hi-Fructose Volume 29) in Tokyo based ACT gallery’s show “The Sailor”. Her style is a balance between ornate details that spill into dramatic washes and splatters. Read more after the jump.