by CaroPosted on

One man’s trash is Khalil Chishtee‘s treasure. We previously featured the Pakistani artist’s ethereal garbage bag sculptures back in 2013, where he breathed new life into unwanted found-objects. Having just come off his debut solo exhibition, “Detritus from Exploded Stars” at Sanat Gallery, Chishtee has since expanded his concept to dig deeper. His latest works make the connection between art created from practically nothing to the creation of life from an empty universe.

by CaroPosted on

Tokyo based Tomoo Gokita paints in a monochrome, abstract style that is simple but haunting to look at. His ongoing black and white gouache series plays on the idea of traditional portraiture. For his next solo show “Bésame Mucho” at Honor Fraser Gallery, Gokita continues to blend this line between figurative and abstraction. If his images feel strangely familiar, it’s because he borrows them from vintage film stills, 1970s magazines and photos. Check out our preview after the jump.

by CaroPosted on

Canadian artist Alexandra Levasseur (previously covered here) has new oil and acrylic paintings on view at Mirus Gallery, “Body of Land”. Her tormented yet feminine subjects, painted in an expressionist style, make a reappearance as if out of a dream. Levasseur’s artwork has always exhibited dreamlike qualities. Here, her subjects exist somewhere between a deep subconscious state and wakefulness. We find them melting into abstract landscapes, non-descript yet wild and untouched. In some of her most gestural work to date, physical form and nature are combined to create a single “body of land.”

by CaroPosted on

Throughout his career, Franco Fasoli aka JAZ has treated his work as a search for identity, primarily between his native Argentina and Mexico. He represents a mix of cultures in motifs like masks, football, popular rituals and clashes between opposing parties, as in his mural about the 2014 Iguala Mass Kidnapping. This sort of confrontation is the main theme of his solo show, “CHOQUE” (English: “Collision”) now on view at Celaya Brothers Gallery in Mexico City. His exhibit offers different interpretations of this idea through culture, beliefs, ideals, and artistic techniques.

by CaroPosted on

Pablo Picasso once said, “There is no abstract art. You must always start with something. Afterward you can remove all traces of reality.” And while art has evolved dramatically, the classic fundamental of anatomy remains the same. Czech sculptor Monika Horčicová creates ornate installations with polyester resin skeletons as her medium. Some might call her work morbid, others a beautiful reimagining and application of the human form. Her technique requires a keen understanding of anatomy before she can manipulate it- and her work is not just an abstraction. She’s walking a line between natural construction and purely artistic expression. Take a look after the jump!

by CaroPosted on

German urban artist Katharina Grosse doesn’t limit her vibrant artworks to a wall- she colors the world around her. Color is absolutely essential to her graffiti that covers buildings, mounds of dirt, and installations that evoke natural wonders like the Northern Lights. Her strokes don’t follow the contours of the chosen environment. They follow that of her own hand as she moves through the space, telling an abstract, emotional narrative. If it looks as though she hovered over the Earth with a spray gun, you would be right. Grosse’s process often involves dangerously leaning over scaffolding or being suspended from a crane. Throughout her career, her materials have varied from the conventional to unconventional; acrylic on canvas paintings and gallery walls to plastic and styrofoam alien-like formations. See more of her work after the jump.