by Clara MoraesPosted on

Strong, clean lines and cubist inspired characters in vivid colors have long been the main signifiers of Berlin based artist James Reka’s, aka Reka’s, paintings. His previous works, featured here on our blog, depict geometrical figures but the choice of colors, the backgrounds, and the style have dramatically changed over the past few years. His graffiti background is becoming less evident as Reka is increasingly interested in abstraction, and his new work may be his most enigmatic.

by CaroPosted on

In depicting the human condition, Jean-Paul Mallozzi uses paint to express emotional narratives. His oil paintings make use of thickly painted areas, moving from more accurate detail to abstract elements and exaggerated colors to imply his subject’s feelings. Color is fundamental to Malozzi’s paintings. “Each one emits a color that echoes complex emotional states that all of us can relate to,” he explains.

by CaroPosted on

Brooklyn based painter Brian Willmont had mostly been making gouache on paper paintings for years and then began to reduce his work, pushing the narrative out of individual pieces. His paintings today share a graphic and theatrical quality with his references, citing obscure movies and novels, such as Suspiria and Blood and Guts in High School, among his inspirations. Today, he works in aspects of trompe l’oeil and airbrush into a unique style of graphic abstraction, using symbols like roses dotted with shining dew drops set against geometric patterns.

by CaroPosted on

Czech artist Jan Uldrych questions reality in his fleshy and atmospheric paintings. Though the artist hesitates to provide any specific meaning for his work, we can find some clues in his titles; paintings like “Anatomy of memories” and “Mild decomposition landscapes” point to Uldrych’s interests in the visceral and anatomical, which he abstracts into Rorschach test-like images.

by CaroPosted on

London based artist duo Kai & Sunny like the idea of showing something you can’t actually see and asking bigger questions. Featured here on our blog, their nature-inspired drawings feature geometric patterns that replicate motifs like the intricacies of flower petals and the dramatic bursts of stars, as if looking through the lens of a super-telescope. Though their energetic and abstract line work has the precision of a machine, everything is drawn by hand using ballpoint pens. For their upcoming exhibition at Stolen Space gallery in London, “Whirlwind Of Time”, the duo sought out to develop their pen drawing series even further.

by CaroPosted on

Richard Colman is well known for his paintings of colorful human figures bending and twisting into abstract compositions. Featured here on our blog, Colman’s new works explore the intricacies and curiosities of human relationships in bold and geometric displays. Similar to the frontalism style seen in Egyptian art, the heads of his figures are usually drawn in profile, while the body is seen from the front. The San Francisco based artist recently exhibited in the rotating Los Angeles exhibition curated by Roger Gastman, “W.I.P.” (Work in Progress), which closed over the holiday.