by CaroPosted on

Oakland based painter Max Kauffman (covered here) seeks to find peace in his soft, loose watercolors that reflect chaos. This journey often leads him to colorful, abstract structures like houses, which he calls his “sanctuaries”. In his artist statement, he says, “The world I portray is sometimes yours and mine and sometimes a more magical place – I call it future primitive. It is a potential path or maybe just a way to reconnect with more pure ideas of culture from our past. It is knowing empires crumble, but accepting the growth that emerges in the aftermath.” His latest series of paintings for “Beautiful Squalor”, now on view at Parlor Gallery in New Jersey, seems to find them in a state of visual disintegration. 

by CaroPosted on

For the majority of his illustration career, Canadian artist Randy Ortiz (first covered here) has drawn images in a graphic style with a surrealistic quality. His love for screen printing and movie posters is apparent in his limited, yet colorful palette, and portrayal of creatures who seem to transform with their surroundings. Among his latest inspirations are artists James Jean or Joao Ruas, who also merge surreal forms of nature with reality in their art. Recently, Ortiz’s personal work has leaned in this more emotive direction.

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Portland based artist Adam Friedman (covered here) has an ongoing fascination with our universe which he explores in his psychedelic works. His art expands on broad themes centered on time and space and other natural phenomenon. Friedman goes “Into the Aether” with his latest solo exhibition, now on view at Mirus Gallery in San Francisco. His show presents a new series of acrylic and acrylic aerosol pieces on canvas, 3D paintings, and a new mural inside the gallery.

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There is an infinite complexity to nature. From sea shells, to the Milky Way galaxy, to the structure of human lungs, there are patterns that exist in everything around us. London based collaborators Kai & Sunny (previously featured here) have always been drawn towards such images created by nature. Opening Saturday, they will exhibit six new ballpoint pen pieces in “The Matter of Time” at 886 Geary Gallery in San Francisco. A more vibrant palette is applied in their new drawings, alongside hand-pulled monochromatic screen prints on copper and paper. Their works magnify and stylize the things that are plainly visible to us but often overlooked. Here, this would be the turn of the tides, represented in energetic, abstract pieces. 

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Photos by Curtis Cole.

Portland based artist Mark Warren Jacques (previously featured here) makes dreamy, futuristic paintings using various elements of form, color and shape. His upcoming exhibition “Looking at You – Looking at Me”, opening June 4th at Flatcolor gallery, exercises these motifs in a series of new seascapes. Warren sees the universe in a unique way. He aims to capture a newfound sense of infinity in these vast, unending places rendered from personal memories. Get a look inside the artist’s studio as he prepares for his new exhibit after the jump.

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San Francisco based artist Joe Hengst presents his idea of the future world in imaginative, acrylic landscape paintings. At the core of his work is his belief in man’s increasing separation from the natural world. Since the beginning of our time, nature has supplied us with the things we need most for survival, such as food, water, clothing, and shelter. With the introduction of modern day society came a change in how we supply our every day needs. Hengst represents our withdrawal from nature by painting ethereal pieces that experiment with abstraction.