by Andy SmithPosted on

Los Angeles artist Bunnie Reiss constructs dreamlike imagery with geometric and mythological themes. Whether it’s traditional surfaces, murals, or even gloves, the artist says she “wishes to map out unusual lives, find hidden and forgotten places, build a unique visual history, and weave it all together as one.”

by Andy SmithPosted on

During her schooling at the Academy of Fine Arts in Warsaw, Polish painter Justyna Kisielewicz was forced to create monochromatic paintings. But after she graduated, she took things in a new direction. Much of her work, primarily her oil paintings, are lush explosions of pink and pop. Now, she’s been dubbed the “princess of pop culture” by Pangea Magazine, who says the artist’s intention is to “intention is to rip up the stereotypical image of the dour Polish artist.”

by Andy SmithPosted on

New York City-based artist Julie Heffernan crafts oil paintings on canvas that depict lush backdrops and occasionally, injects the artist herself into fantastical narratives and allegories. However, much of the recent work shown here pulls the camera back for a holistic view into fictional worlds. The artist last appeared on HiFructose.com here.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Andrew Chuani Ho, a Los Angeles native, creates vibrant scenes with colored pencil on paper, with works that are both surreal and autobiographical. In his first solo show at Richard Heller Gallery, titled Days and Day, the artist brings his trademark insanity and blending components in a new set of works. The artist cites influences like Matisse, Marquez, and even Henry Darger. From the gallery: “Having a deeply spiritual upbringing, Ho’s work exhibits the use of patterns, colors and symbols to reinterpret myths and fables of yore into meditatively drawn colored pencil drawings.”

by Andy SmithPosted on

Using acrylics and oils on wood panels, Marc Burckhardt creates timeless, fantastical paintings packed with allegory and storytelling. The artist cites Northern Renaissance and Dutch secular painting as influences in his work, with his own, personal narratives woven into each creation. Though each piece only focuses on one or a handful of beings, lush backdrops and detail add to the absorbing quality to these works.

by Andy SmithPosted on


Ana Bidart, a Uruguay-born artist based in Mexico City, has spent a portion of her career working with “desechos,” or “residues.” This idea refers to the objects that are necessary but not often highlighted. In dissecting rolls of toilet paper and packing materials and forms needed for art fairs, Bidart offers a delicate, engrossing side to essential, yet discarded goods.