by CaroPosted on

In Greek mythology, “the Kindly Ones”, also known as Furies, are female deities or goddesses of vengeance from the underworld. They were tasked with pursuing people who have done evil and justifying their horrific crimes, making them equal sides of good and bad. Furies are the inspiration behind “The Kindly Ones” by artists David Stoupakis and Menton3, which opened over the weekend at Last Rites Gallery. Both artists are recognized for their haunting oil paintings that combine visuals of beauty with dark themes. See more after the jump.

by CaroPosted on

Moscow based artist Dima Rebus paints subdued watercolors of urban life as envisioned by his subjects. Here, life is occupied by situations that are humorous, but also full of uncertainty and fear. In surreal, slightly unsettling scenes, we find young people sleeping in and forgetting their chores while newer works have more serious implications. Titles such as “Life in my city implies heavy consumption of carbohydrates” also imply the artist’s reservations and concerns about environmental issues.

by CaroPosted on

A new exhibit opening today at the Fort Wayne Museum of Art aims to take a snap shot of the ever growing New Contemporary “school”. It’s class? Many will be familiar to Hi-Fructose readers: Andrew Hem (HF Vol. 21 cover artist), Curiot (Hf Vol. 29), Ekundayo (HF Vol. 9), Erik Jones (HF Vol. 27 cover artist), Kwon Kyungyup (HF Vol. 24), Natalia Fabia (HF Vol. 22), Scott Radke (Hf Vol. 6), Yoskay Yamamoto (HF Vol. 8), and Yosuke Ueno (HF Vol. 10), to name a few. The exhibition will also include an abstract installation by artist Brett Amory (HF Vol. 20). “Invisible College”, which is co-curated by the museum’s Josef Zimmerman and Thinkspace Gallery in Los Angeles, presents New Contemporary as a movement that is both traditionally inspired and non traditional. See more after the jump.

by CaroPosted on

New York-based artist Naoto Hattori, first featured in HF Vol. 7 and most recently, HF Vol. 35, creates dreamy paintings that are snap shots from his visionary world. It is there in the private recesses of his consciousness where his subjects thrive, he says. Opening July 18th, Hattori’s next exhibition at Copro Gallery in Los Angeles titled “Genesis” delves even deeper into the artist’s mind – where we dare to think about our creation and place in the universe. See more after the jump.

by Nick PizanaPosted on

First featured in HF Vol. 18, FAILE is a collaboration between Brooklyn-based artists Patrick McNeil and Patrick Miller. Known for their critique on modern consumer culture and over indulgence, the two man art collective covers the walls of the Brooklyn Museum this week with their eye-catching, graphic style for their latest exhibition “Savage/Sacred Young Minds.” The exhibition sees the addition of new paintings and sculptures that display the artists’ growth, and also brings back some of their most well-known previous work including their two installations, “Temple” and “The FAILE & BÄST Deluxx Fluxx Arcade”.

by CaroPosted on

Tomorrow night, American artist Wayne White will exhibit alongside his son, Woodrow White, for the first time in San Francisco at Heron Arts Gallery. In 1986, Wayne White earned international acclaim as the set and puppet designer of TV series Pee Wee’s Playhouse, for which he won three Emmy awards. “Ass Kicking Contest” brings the same slapstick and backwards charm that will be familiar to fans of his work on the show. Originally from Chattanooga, Tennessee and now living and working in Los Angeles, he credits his Southern roots for his unique take on Americana and D.I.Y. style. In addition to witty word paintings like “Hoo Ha” and works on paper, he will also present animated puppets.