by CaroPosted on

Jonny Green’s oil paintings of haphazardly-made sculptures are part portrait, part still life. The UK based painter, who lives and works in London, describes his work as a combination of the “carefree and painstaking”, images of crudely built subjects made of a strange selection of items- modelling clay, office tape, flowers, Christmas lights, and whatever else is immediately available to him- which he then renders in incredibly meticulous detail.

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Detroit based multimedia artist Andy Krieger is inspired by ordinary subjects from his every life, but when applied to his three-dimensional paintings, something extraordinary happens. “I make art work that straddles a boundary between two and three dimensions,” Krieger writes. “Sculptural paintings with an open ended narrative, that also starts a dialogue between the piece and the viewer about perception and perspective.” More like dioramas, his art makes us rethink how we look at painting.

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Honolulu, Hawaii based photographer and designer Petey Ulatan often creates images that explore the impossible. A recent series, which Ulatan posts to his Instagram page, takes this idea and applies it to infinite scenarios: digital photo-manipulations of his own photographs from his travels, others from Google images, that re-shape the world as if it were folded into a giant cube.

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Guillermo del Toro is known as one of the most imaginative filmmakers working today. As the director of some of this generation’s most inventive horror and monster genre films, from Hellboy (2004), Pan’s Labyrinth (2006), Pacific Rim (2013), and Crimson Peak (2015), it should come as no surprise that del Toro loves monsters- and he has a creepy art collection to match. His treasured collection has been a work in progress since he was a child in Guadalajara, Mexico, and given its significant impact on del Toro’s work and process, is now being brought to the public, courtesy of LACMA.

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Bilbo’s hobbit hole, a rusty ranch, and a workshop with an old Thunderbird ’55 are just a few of the tiny worlds hand-crafted by Raphael Truffi Bortholuzzi. The Sao Paulo based artist and miniaturist began building the dioramas in 2010, an ongoing project that he calls “Grandmondo Miniatures”, meaning “big world” miniatures. Though his dioramas are fantastic in their smallness, and sometimes delve into imagined worlds, for the most part, Bortholuzzi says he is interested in imitating real life.

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Maria Kreyn is a Russian born, New York based artist often described as a realist, and while she has a command of painting the human figure, her exquisitely rendered oil paintings are more concerned with what we can’t see. To borrow a quote from Aristotle, one of her favorite philosophers, “The aim of art is to represent not the outward appearance of things, but their inward significance.” Kreyn carries this notion with her as she works, seeking to depict people in a realistic light, while capturing their essence and soul. “I make work that looks to infinity- that’s spiritually driven,” she says.