by Andy SmithPosted on


Ben Tolman, an artist based in Washington, D.C., crafts intricate urban scenes that are absorbing at every inch. His new show, titled “Weltschmerz: Recent Drawings by Ben Tolman,” brings a new series of works to Gallery Neptune and Brown in DC. The word means “world pain” in German, and like his ink and gouache images prior, his work reflects both precision and insanity. Or as the gallery says, “in the tradition of Hieronymus Bosch and M.C. Escher, Tolman delves in to the fantastic imagery of impossible chaos.” Tolman was last featured on HiFructose.com here. The show runs through Feb. 25.

by Andy SmithPosted on


Lucas Zimmermann, a self-taught photographer, explores light and color with his “Traffic Lights” series. The project exists in two separate parts, with “Traffic Lights 2.0” debuting just months ago. In these haunting shots, the photographer offers no human interactivity with the lights, which of course, are intended solely to move individuals from point A to B. Zimmermann photographed these in the place in which he lives and works, in Weimar, Germany.

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Claire Partington, a ceramics artist living and working in London, is a storyteller. The artist says that the aesthetic of her spellbinding figures is inspired by the “European Applied Art and Design styles from the 1600s onwards.” Yet, she’s fascinated by the tradition of appropriating so-called “exotic” styles and cobbling together influences into a single artifact also drives her work.

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Stuart Snoddy, a painter based in the Midwest, creates “fantasies and fictions about imaginary people.” His oil works on paper and on canvas move between the wistful and the contemplative. And while Snoddy plays with form and hues, each of the artist’s pieces are distinctly human.

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Primarily using newspapers and tape, Will Kurtz creates everyday, life-sized people and animal companions. The artist, a native of Flint, Michigan, is able to convey flourishes of realism, even with these unlikely materials. The artist, now based in Brooklyn, says his work hinges on capturing moments in time.

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The easily stirred may want to avoid rooms transformed by Austrian artist Peter Kogler, whose funhouse-like creations place wild patterns and illusions inside various spots across the world. Kogler uses varying mediums and disciplines to accomplish this, from architecture and computer art to painting and sculpture. Each of these creations feel like a new reality, in which twisting and writhing shapes envelope the viewers.