by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

UK-based artist Candice Tripp’s paintings of youthful characters frolicking through dark forests are at once haunting and whimsical. The children in her works, who often wear masks and anachronistic outfits, appear at once sinister, demure, and naive, sending mixed signals to her viewers. Are they specters who haunt these mythical forests, or lost souls struggling to get out? We last covered Tripp’s 2012 solo show at Black Rat Projects here, and last week, she debuted new works for her one-night-only exhibition, “Credulous Morons,” at Baltic 39 in Newcastle, where she lives and works. To mark the occasion, today we survey some of the paintings she has created since we heard from her last.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Levi van Levuw cultivates a sense of mystery and foreboding with his chiaroscuro charcoal drawings, which feature inanimate objects scattered in empty rooms that appear devoid of a human presence. Whether drawing palm trees, bookshelves, drawers, or stairs, Levuw’s presentation of these items is highly stylized and architectural. He appears interested in studying their formal qualities and creating new patterns with objects his viewers would normally consider mundane.

by CaroPosted on

Berlin based artist Jaybo Monk (previously featured here) is the architect of an abstract world in his paintings. Human figures, which he likens to “cathedrals”, are split apart, masses of muscle and shapes swimming around the canvas that leave us feeling disoriented. Combined, they provide the backdrop for a landscape with no boundaries, a place Monk calls “nowhere”. His current exhibition “Nowhere Is Now Here”, which opened last night at Soze Gallery in Los Angeles, explores this concept of wandering, both literally and metaphorically.

by CaroPosted on

Andrew Hem (HF Vol. 21 cover artist) makes his curatorial debut tomorrow with “Ill Squad!”, a group exhibition of his fellow artists at Giant Robot gallery. Throughout his career, Hem has shed a light on his favorite artists in another way, in his lush and colorful paintings. Among his subjects are those who inspire him creatively, which he portrays either at work in their studio or on some fantastical adventure. At his solo exhibition last year, “Dream but Don’t Sleep” (covered here), Hem shared with us his ongoing enthusiasm for garnering a public interest in his friends’ work. Nearly all of the artists in his “squad” stem from an illustration background, but together their works are eclectic and showcase a variety of media.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Ashley Eliza Williams’ latest painting series is called “Sentient,” and for good reason. Williams paints biomorphic shapes that resemble both rocks and flesh. Overgrown with colorful moss, these mysterious shapes float in mid air or stand solemnly amid desolate landscapes. Their alien flora seems to blossom uncontrollably, evoking bacteria and plant life alike. Its ability to grow in otherwise desolate spaces gestures towards the tenacity of living things.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

The unintentional glitches of our computer screens are normally a nuisance, but they become the central focus of our attention when viewing Felipe Pantone’s work. Pantone paints graphic patterns that evoke ones that appear on our devices only in the event of a terrible malfunction. The CMYK colors in his murals will look familiar to anyone who has ever dropped their laptop. Using spraypaint, Pantone plays with optical illusions, creating multilayered images that seem to shape-shift depending on the viewer’s orientation. Pantone currently has a show on view at Delimbo Gallery in Sevilla, Spain. Check out some of his recent street art below.