by CaroPosted on

Japanese artist Stephanie Inagaki’s black and white charcoal drawings depict female figures that are not only an embodiment of her roots, but also of herself as an artist and a woman. For the past couple of years, she has been incorporating the Japanese ghost folklore and mythology of her culture into what she describes as “pillars of inspiration”; tall, bold, creative women, often self-portraits, that represent the well rounded woman Inagaki aspires to be. Previously featured on our blog, she likens the figures in her drawings to the Creation and Destruction goddesses like Kali from India or Izanami from Japan, and there is generally an underlying theme of life and death throughout. Inagaki invited Hi-Fructose into her new studio in Los Angeles to give us a preview and tell us more about the direction of where her work is going.

by Sasha BogojevPosted on

A riot cop covered in flames in the middle of the street, Claude Monet’s poppies swallowed by a hole in the sky, and a large ship tearing up the Earth’s surface, leaving a bloody scar behind it- these are images Pejac recently shared on his Facebook page, where he just announced his highly anticipated solo exhibition in London. Known primarily for his striking “public interventions”, works that cleverly mix illusion and reality, fantasy and familiarity featured here, the Barcelona based street artist is once again moving his work from the public arena and into the gallery.

by CaroPosted on

Melbourne, Florida based artist Derek Gores relates creating collage art to a dreamy, abstract search, digging through representational images to find beauty. Previously featured here on our blog, Gores has said that his primary motivation as an artist is to combine elements and make something new, a fundamental principle of collage. His colorful collages borrow clippings from recycled magazines, maps, and labels, reassembled into bright images of figures that pull both contemporary and vintage design styles.

by CaroPosted on

Daniel Adel has a particular fascination with drapery that he expresses in his dynamic oil paintings of sculptures wrapped in cloth. Working out of his studio in the village of Lourmarin in Provence, France, Adel creates his fantastical visions of drapery, where the folds of cloth seem to defy gravity as they wrap around classical-shaped busts. The depiction of drapery throughout history has been used to emphasize the contours of the human figure, especially in Greek Art, where it suggested lines of force and indicated the past and future actions of the figures it clings to.

by Sasha BogojevPosted on

We’ve already seen murals and graffiti turned into a moving image with a simple, stop-motion animation. From Blu’s elaborate 7-minute video “Muto” (Silent) to INSA’s captivating graphic based “gif-ffiti” series, featured here on our blog, the idea of bringing life to walls has been a challenging one that street artists have enjoyed for years. What we haven’t seen yet is a photo-realistic mural turning into animation, and Croatian artist Lonac did just that as an early Valentine’s day treat.

by CaroPosted on

The art of glassblowing is a demanding and unforgiving process, and even with today’s modernized equipment, molding the hot liquid glass can be very dangerous. Indiana based artist Kiva Ford appreciates these qualities of the ancient medium, an art form that he says forces the artist to remain in the present. He sculpts in glass every day, almost obsessively, creating miniatures of things like flowers, animals and geometric forms that he traps in a “ship in the bottle” style bubble or orb.