by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Little is known about Japanese artist trio three. The young, anonymous artist collective utilizes toys and other childhood ephemera to create provocative installations and sculptures. Action figures and rubber figurines are melted into fleshy masses. The artists create complex, geometric forms out of the liquified toys, forming them into patters that alternate distinguishable characters’ faces and anonymous, tan blobs where limbs and bodies used to be. Micro elements accumulate into overwhelming conglomerations that challenge the viewer’s eye to distinguish their many details.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Canadian photographer Sarah Anne Johnson captures impassioned moments, expressing the emotion behind them by painting and etching directly onto her prints. In her latest series, “Wanderlust,” the artist captured sexual intimacy, photographing partners as well as individuals. Johnson’s view of eroticism comes across subtly. None of her models appear to be performing for the camera. They seem so at ease that one begins to wonder how Johnson gained access into her subjects’ most private experiences. The abstract embellishments she adds to her photos float like auras around the figures, as if the psychic connection between them has become tangible for us to witness.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Beijing-based painter and illustrator Alice Lin creates nostalgic, whimsical works on paper. The world she develops evokes Victorian-era storybook illustrations with its lush, ornate flora as a recurring decorative motif, but the artist’s imagery is far more contemplative and melancholic. Using watercolor and natural mineral pigment, she envelopes her characters in a marbled texture with wisps of gradients that seem to float though her scenes like fog. As viewers, we come upon her characters in moments of contemplation, staring with downcast eyes or obscuring their faces from our gaze.

by CaroPosted on

Marcas Contemporary Art gallery in Santa Ana, CA is currently showing conceptual new pieces from their growing roster of fine artists. “Pardon My French”, curated by local artist Tomi Monstre, is designed to create a single narrative through a variety of styles, which incorporate painting, photography, sculpture, and paper-cut works. This includes dreamy contributions shown below by sculptor Gosia, Christine Wu, Stephanie Inagaki, Korin Faught, Tara McPherson, Polly Pardo, Danni Shinya Luo, and others. They are donating a portion of their sales to the organization Inspire Artistic Minds, which provides scholarships and education to advance the arts in the areas of taste, sight and sound, with a focus on the food industry.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

New York-based artist George Boojury paints animals that often return the viewer’s gaze. His large-scale ink works on paper (10 feet long is typical for one of his pieces) invite his audiences to confront majestic, wild creatures head-on. In setting up this interaction, the artist quietly prompts us to contemplate our relationship with the animal world. Boojury paints with great detail, mapping out every hair and wrinkle. Bob cats and buffalo pose nonchalantly against white backgrounds that evoke a photo studio. Though Boojury’s imagery is stoic and straightforward, one can’t help but be reminded of the perils wildlife faces as human activity further encroaches on its habitats.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

A kaleidoscopic range of colors is part of Katwise’s M.O. The artist and designer applies a maximalist aesthetic to her paintings, murals and fashion designs, incorporating the largest amount of rainbow hues and trippy details that will fit. After hitchhiking and traveling the world with her art for years, in 2010, she acquired her Upstate New York dwelling and undertook an enormous renovation project that converted it into a veritable interactive work of art.