by Hi-Fructose StaffPosted on

Our 36th volume of Hi-Fructose New Contemporary Art Magazine arrives in July! Featured in our next print issue is: a major feature on art pioneer Robert Williams, the colorful installations of Pip & Pop, a review of cover artist Kehinde Wiley’s new monograph, Erin M. Riley’s embroidered selfies, Chiho Aoshima’s solo exhibition in Seattle, Cinta Vidal Agullo’s mesmerizing paintings, new works from Portland artist Blaine Fontana, the paintings of Mike Davis, a thought provoking article on the art and travels of street artist Swoon, plus reviews on the Sick Rose; featuring medical illustrations from tester-year and much more! Also, We’re thrilled to present this issue’s special 16-page insert section featuring Winnie Truong’s beautifully strange color pencil drawings, all in one issue!

by CaroPosted on

Doug Fogelson does not use cameras of any kind to create his colorful, x-ray like images of animal and plant specimens. His artwork consists of photograms, made by a method where the artist places an object directly onto film and exposes it to colored light. The final image is a shadow of the original form, which can appear either opaque or having a ghostly translucence depending on the transparency of the subject. The transparency film that is used needs to be exposed in a space with total darkness, a process Fogelson makes repeatedly, and with a high attention to detail.

by CaroPosted on

Austrian photographer Andreas Franke combines his two passions for the camera and scuba diving in his images of a ghostly sinking world. His digital montages combine the artist’s own photographs of sunken ships with carefully orchestrated sets, built above the surface at his studio. In his statement, Franke writes, “With my photographs of sunken shipwrecks, I want to pull the spectators into unreal and strange worlds. Mystified scenes of the past play within a fictional space. Dreamworlds you can get lost in or you can identify with. This creates a new and unexpected atmosphere. This work shows a lot of myself, since I am always on the lookout for stunning themes to create new images never seen before.”

by CaroPosted on

HF Vol. 21 artist Katsuyo Aoki is perhaps best known for her intricate, pure white porcelain skulls, covered here. Her latest sculptures are decorated with colorful designs, some of which are now on display in “The Colors of Globalization” at Bernardaud Foundation in Paris. It was Victorian England that kicked off the trade of blue and white porcelain originally. Aoki’s palette draws upon this time period, which dates back to 18th century designs that imitated Chinese porcelain.

by CaroPosted on

Mexican artist Damián Ortega (covered here) reconceptualizes everyday objects in his sculptural installations. For twenty years, his creative interests have lied in the deconstruction of form and how things are assembled. His solo exhibition at HangarBiocca in Milan, Italy, “Casino,” is also a retrospective of his most famous works through today. This includes his new installation, “Zoom,” made for the event. The experience of viewing his artwork has been described as “explosive,” displaying a burst of energy, like an exploding star. Objects and vehicles such as his Volkswagon Bug, “Cosmic Thing,” (2002) are transformed as a critique about technological innovation. See more after the jump.

by CaroPosted on

The characters in Yoskay Yamamoto’s paintings are often portrayed submerged in water. With eyes half-closed and a serene expression on their faces, they seem at peace in the cool blue seas painted from the artist’s dreams. The concept of being submerged, for Yamamoto, represents his place between cultures as a Japanese artist living in America. His ocean possesses a strong physical and emotional power because of this. It’s waters contain new elements in his latest series of 12 paintings, debuting on Friday at the Honolulu Museum of Art’s Contempo #ArtShop, curated by Giant Robot.