by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on


Jim Dingilian’s work comes in the form of a message in a bottle, which he draws with the tip of candle on the glass’s surface. The result is a smokey image nestled within the bottle’s concave shape. Dingilian uses his unconventional medium in a way that evokes India ink, impressively handling the flame like a brush. His scenes are well-defined and highly detailed. Dingilian has fun with layering opaque and translucent layers of smoke, resulting in complex scenes within each vessel.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

New Delhi-based illustrator Archan Nair creates fluorescent digital art with a painterly effect. Nair composes kaleidoscopic images that resemble Rorschach ink blots. Wisps of color tumble like clouds of pigment in water, creating nebulous shapes that morph into one another. His work has a psychedelic quality evocative of the spiritually-focused visionary art movement, which borrows heavily from Hindu iconography in particular. While human subjects are at the center of Nair’s work, he melts figurative elements into textured, abstract designs and otherworldly visuals.

by CaroPosted on

LA Art Show’s 20th anniversary edition continues through this weekend, January 18th, at the Los Angeles Convention Center. Not just a special anniversary, this year is also dedicated to expanding the fair’s Japanese gallery selection. These include Mizoe Art Gallery, Gallery Kitai, Niche Gallery, Kinoshu Kikau, Watanabe Fine Art and Tachibana Gallery, which offer fresh perspectives of New Contemporary art alongside their Western counterparts in Littletopia; Roq La Rue, Thinkspace, Spoke Art, La Luz de Jesus, Varnish Fine Art and more.

by CaroPosted on

Photos by Birdman

Wednesday night marked the 20th anniversary of LA Art Show, and West Coast artists from all over came to celebrate their largest art fair. The event was co-hosted by Amy Adams, fresh off her Golden Globe win for Best Actress in Big Eyes, where she plays Margaret Keane (Vol 34 cover artist). Margaret Keane is one of hundreds of artists whose art is on display here. Many of them call the ‘Littletopia’ section their “home”. It’s entrance is decorated with a special frosted cake archway by Scott Hove (Hi-Fructose Collected 3), with ‘Littletopia’ written in icing. Their collected styles are colorful, intriguing, playful and provocative, and sometimes cynical- misfits in the world of art welcomed by galleries Sloan Fine Art, Breeze Block, La Luz de Jesus, Last Rites Gallery, Roq La Rue, Spoke Art, Thinkspace Gallery, Varnish Fine Art, and Corey Helford.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

David Spriggs uses a combinations of acrylic paint and transparent plastic sheets to create sculptural installations with images floating within them. Spriggs divides his abstract designs into layers and paints them one by one until they accumulate into an illusory final product. His work focuses on radiating patterns that evoke various cosmic phenomena. With his strategic use of lighting, the nebulas come to life and appear to levitate before the viewer.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Daesung Lee’s photo series “Futuristic Archeology” visualizes the threat climate change poses to Mongolia’s traditional nomadic culture. As global warming takes its course, the country’s once-lush land has become increasingly arid. According to a Mongolian government survey, hundreds of lakes and rivers have dried out. Twenty-five percent of the territory has turned into desert within the past 30 years. Mongolia’s nomadic people, who comprise about 35 percent of the population, haven’t fared well with these changes, as they depend on the land for their livelihood.