by Andy SmithPosted on


Erin McCarty, an Alaska-born, Arizona-based painter, creates large-scale gouache works that mix influences like the natural world, the human body, and the abstract ideas and emotions surrounding our place in the world. After graduating from the Pacific Northwest College of Art in Portland in 2010, the artist worked in the Oregan area before returning to her home state of Alaska, where she recharged and created a new body of work inspired by the region. These days, she lives in Tucson, where she’s inspired by a new terrain and ecosystem.

by Andy SmithPosted on

In works that “explore our notions of contentment and security,” artist Dietrich Wegner creates surreal images that bring clouds closer to the earth and explores identity through logos embedded onto children. These are works full of contradiction, both humorous and sobering, whimsical and harrowing. The ideas are conveyed in both sculptural works and prints, offering several points of entry into the mind of the artist.

by Andy SmithPosted on


Israeli artist Zemer Peled uses slivers of porcelain to emulate shapes and forms of the natural world, from feathers to leaves and petals. The result is something otherworldly, blending hues and patterns for something both familiar and strange. The delicate and organic constructions defy their actual sharp, hardened nature. These works come in differing sizes, from the size of common houseplants to towering over viewers, all made from thousands of pieces of porcelain.

by Andy SmithPosted on

More than 20 artists participate in the Painted Prosthetic Project, which raises money to assist homeless and wounded veterans. A gallery show, kicking off on Jan. 6, displays the works–created on prosthetic legs– before they’re auctioned off online at the end of the month. The gallery hosting the show is Arch Enemy Arts, which is based in Philadelphia. After the end of the run there, the pieces are shipped to Orlando to be auctioned off.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Denis Sarazhin, a Ukraine-born artist, crafts textured oil paintings that convey both mystery and motion. His “Pantomime” series, in particular, focuses on gestures and a dramatic sense of motion through multiple limbs and hands. His work has been compared to masters like Egon Schiele, though through the kinetic nature and specific use of color in his work, Sarazhin has forged an approach all his own.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Dylan Egon, a New York City-born artist raised by two fine artists, creates sculptures and assemblages that reflect American culture, whether through religious or monetary iconography. A New York Times review once referred to his work as “sites of cultural compression, fetishization and wonder.” Egon was last featured on HiFructose.com here.