by CaroPosted on

When we say goodbye to the things we once loved, we face feelings of loneliness and nostalgia. Artist Caitlin McCormack experienced these feelings when her grandparents passed away, and she found comfort in crochet, a family tradition: “My grandmother was a very talented crocheter, and my grandfather was an exceptionally-skilled bird carver. Something about the receptive process of crocheting seemed to help me to cope with their absence.” McCormack’s delicate crocheted designs of animal skeletons come from death, but she uses them to reconstruct memories from life.

by CaroPosted on

Matthias Gephart is a graphic designer and illustrator based in Berlin, Germany, who is revisiting his roots in graffiti in a project that incorporates his creative interests. “Stylewise, my personal background is the underground and alternative music scene, graffiti writing and Dadaist collage,” Gephart shares. Since 2010, he has been transforming neglected spaces with his graffiti that combines graphic design and collage visuals, taking the idea of mural painting to the expanse of an entire room. He calls this project “The Magic Moment.”

by Andy SmithPosted on

Photographer Aida Muluneh has lived all over the world, but it was in returning to Ethiopia that she found inspiration for her latest body of work. Muluneh’s first solo exhibition for David Kruts Projects in New York City was titled “The World is 9,” and it featured new images from the artist. The title comes from something the artist’s grandmother used to say: “The world is 9. It is never complete and never perfect.”

by Clara MoraesPosted on

Magnus Gjoen’s digital works make us look twice to grasp their meaning. He wants us to see in a different light, being it weapons, animals or the human race itself. Gjoen’s unique style of juxtaposing themes of religion, war, beauty, and destruction in his art, featured on our blog here, bring us to also question their correlation.

by CaroPosted on

To Brooklyn, New York based artist Dan Witz, the mosh pit is a place of savage beauty. Featured here on our blog, the longtime street artist, who was in his own punk band, combines his passion for art and the energy of the hardcore music scene in his “Mosh Pit” series. He slows down the chaos of the nightclub from the musician’s perspective into paintings that are strangely primal, focused on both the private and collective experience.

by CaroPosted on

There is an infinite number of ways that Lego toys can be arranged. Artists have taken the popular Danish toy to surprising places, pushing it beyond the boundary of what “toys” are, as we’ve seen here on our blog. But one artist Jan Vormann based in Berlin, Germany has taken Lego to the streets. Some have called it “Lego bombing”, but Vormann prefers to describe his work as “patchwork”, a project that he is bringing around the world.