by Andy SmithPosted on

Miami’s Douglas Hoekzema, also known as Hoxxoh, creates murals that do more than absorb the gaze of the viewer. Nearby objects appear as though they can be pulled into the artist’s latest, hyperdimensional works. Hoekzema has long been fascinated with the concept and rendering of time in his art. He was last featured on HiFructose.com here (and check out his Instagram here).

by Andy SmithPosted on

The dream worlds depicted in Alison Stinely’s sculptural paintings extend off the panel and into the psyche of the viewer. And from process to execution, the artist’s work hinges on blurred realities.

by Margot BuermannPosted on

Since 2005, Australian artist Buff Diss has been adorning city sidewalks, trains, and industrial buildings through his unconventional use of tape – expanding upon the more traditional forms associated with street art. His body of work incorporates a variety of styles and subject material, from contour drawing and geometric shapes to intricate portraits of mythological figures. Despite the impermanent nature of the chosen medium, the artwork itself leaves a lasting impression on those who are fortunate to see it.

by Margot BuermannPosted on


Michelle Avery Konczyk‘s beautifully strange portraits of young women with ghostly appearances and third eyes are a far cry from the cheerful, impressionistic paintings we commonly associate with the watercolor medium. “It is my goal,” the artist says, “to push the boundaries of the medium and take it where no artist has gone before, not only in technique and subject matter, but in presentation.” Moving between the realms of both realism and surrealism, Konczyk’s work is layered with imagery that juxtaposes love and beauty with darkness and morbidity as a means to explore “the beauty that lies within our ugly realities.”

by Margot BuermannPosted on

With his dreamlike, ink-on-paper renderings of mystical rivers, mountains and forests, Cuban artist Rubén Fuentes aims to recapture the grandeur and power of nature at a time when our planet’s ecosystems are in their most vulnerable state. Borrowing from the concepts and aesthetics of Chinese and Japanese shan-shui and sumi-e brush painting, Fuentes uses a combination of spontaneous and detail-oriented brush work to depict vast landscapes and overgrown structures in an attempt to “return to nature what has been taken away” by generations of human destruction.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Armando Veve, a Philadelphia-based artist, creates drawings of surreal scenes and constructions, though each element is rendered in realism. His eye for detail works on granular level, with Veve’s slow and meticulous process producing countless dots and lines for one cohesive image. The style recalls both pointillism and vintage illustrations in reference books. And its striking results have garnered commissions from high-profile publications. Veve was last featured on Hi-Fructose here.