by Andy SmithPosted on

Two solo shows kick off this weekend at Thinkspace Gallery in Culver City, Calif.: Audrey Kawasaki‘s “Interlude” and Stella Im Hultberg‘s “Hollow Resonance.” Both shows kick off on Saturday (Nov. 12) and run through Dec. 3.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Matt Gordon is a mixed-media artist based in Plymouth, Mich., where he crafts both surreal acrylic paintings and graphite drawings. In these images, skeleton characters, bat-human hybrids, and other creatures interact and frolic in different scenarios. Or, as the artist puts it, his works in both mediums “take place in the same dreamy world of happier times.”

by Andy SmithPosted on


Painter Pamela Wilson pushes her absorbing, eerie imagery with a mixture of oils and gold leaf, crafting shimmering images of isolated subjects. Wilson’s paintings stir in the often off-kilter expressions of her subjects and overall otherworldliness of the setting. Wilson is part of a new show at Australia’s beinArt Gallery. “Jamais Vu” pairs the artist’s work with Kit King and Oda, a husband and wife duo that collaborates on oil paintings.

by Andy SmithPosted on

In conjunction with “Turn the Page: The First Ten Years of Hi-Fructose” at Virginia Museum of Contemporary Art, painter Martin Wittfooth visits for a talk and Q&A on Thursday, Nov. 10. The narratives of the artist’s paintings focus on animals, offering allegorical and dystopian tales of a post-human world. The artist created the cover for Hi-Fructose Volume 35. The talk, kicking off at 6:30 p.m., is free for museum members and $5 for non-members. Get more info here.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Los Angeles artist Bunnie Reiss constructs dreamlike imagery with geometric and mythological themes. Whether it’s traditional surfaces, murals, or even gloves, the artist says she “wishes to map out unusual lives, find hidden and forgotten places, build a unique visual history, and weave it all together as one.”

by Andy SmithPosted on

During her schooling at the Academy of Fine Arts in Warsaw, Polish painter Justyna Kisielewicz was forced to create monochromatic paintings. But after she graduated, she took things in a new direction. Much of her work, primarily her oil paintings, are lush explosions of pink and pop. Now, she’s been dubbed the “princess of pop culture” by Pangea Magazine, who says the artist’s intention is to “intention is to rip up the stereotypical image of the dour Polish artist.”