by CaroPosted on

Michael Jackson is a British artist currently exploring the luminogram process to capture monochromatic, abstract displays of light. For those who aren’t familiar, luminograms are images created by exposure of photosensitive materials to light without the intervention of an object. “No camera, no film, no objects – just light directed onto light sensitive paper in the darkroom,” explains Jackson.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Though hyper-realistic dolls aren’t a new invention, Michael Zajkov finds a stirring balance of engrossing detail and beauty that isn’t idealized perfection. The Russian artist’s sculpts don’t just look realistic—they look like real people, even if they’re not from this century. When the creations don early-1900s attire and are posed with 13 movable joints, their humble expressions bring viewers closer, if not a little cautious, in case they begin to move.

by CaroPosted on

Tbilisi, Georgia based artist Tezi Gabunia’s latest project not only invites you to go inside of an art gallery, but become the art, too. “Put Your Head into Gallery” features identical miniature sets of some of the world’s most famous galleries such as the Louvre, the Tate Modern, Saatchi Gallery, and Gagosian, which he then places a model’s head inside of and photographs. The result is a surreal series of images of giant human heads peering into galleries, recalling Eric White’s miniature exhibits.

by CaroPosted on

The Louvre’s famous giant glass pyramid, designed by Chinese-American architect I.M. Pei, became a landmark of the city of Paris in 1989- until it was made invisible by French street artist JR last week. The artist’s installation is a trick of the eye, a gigantic paper photograph of the Louvre Museum covering the pyramid as part of JR’s “artist takeover”. Featured here on our blog, JR is well known for monumental black and white pastings covering buildings all over the world.

by CaroPosted on

Hebru Brantley (featured here) is well known for his pop-infused paintings and sculptures of child-like heroes inspired by Japanese anime and graffiti. Growing up in Chicago in the midst of gang culture, Brantley has expressed that “when all else failed, I could turn to art”, turning his reality into a fantasy world. He is constantly looking to create imagery that evokes emotion and tells stories, particularly of youth. Having traveled all over the world to exhibit his art, he is now making his Pittsburgh debut with “I Wish I Knew How It Felt to Be Free”.

by Andy SmithPosted on

On the section marked “Giant Drawing” on Sergio Barrale’s website, a factoid provides a sense of the hardship that goes into each portrait: “500-700 pencils died in the process of making these works.” Look into any corner of Sergio’s “faces,” and you’ll believe him.