by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on


Lola Dupre (HF Vol. 28) manipulates photographs sans photoshop, cutting and pasting them into new images entirely by hand. Last time we covered her on the blog, she had taken a break from her figurative works to concentrate on monochromatic, Op Art-inspired abstract designs. But with her latest body of work, Dupre has returned to portraiture, this time unveiling a new body of work in full color. Apart from her personal projects, she recently created a fashion editorial for the Spanish fashion magazine Vein using her signature style.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Wookjae Maeng creates ceramic sculptures filled with animal characters. Often gathered together in stylized arrangements, Maeng’s works utilize the shapes of these creatures in surreal ways that bare little resemblance to nature. This disorienting effect is intentional: One of Maeng’s goals is to make his viewers consider humans’ impact on the environment and the way we often thoughtlessly manipulate nature to suit our own ends. “In my work I hope to provide an opportunity — however brief — for modern man to consider the realities of the environment in which he exists, even as he continues his daily existence indifferent to it,” he says.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Though Athens, Greece-based artist Constantine Lianos creates mostly figurative work, he insists that it in no way is meant to be realistic. Instead, his dark, monochromatic drawings and paintings are created entirely from his imagination. “The painting process is for me the ultimate introspection process, where the rational and the emotional are inseparable, where the method meets the random,” writes Lianos in his statement. Sometimes humorous and sometimes disturbing, each character in his work appears preoccupied with an internal struggle that Lianos illustrates in unexpected ways.

by CaroPosted on

Trippy magicians and warriors find themselves in an unnamed land with black skies in Martin Ontiveros’ current exhibition, “Strange and Unlovely” at Pony Club Gallery. Based in Portland, the artist and self-described metal-head (HF Collected Edition 3) has created a world of bizarre denizens throughout his painting career. Featuring new ink illustrations, mainly monochromatic, the show indulges in their fantastic strangeness. Check out more photos from the show after the jump!

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

An expert in the software program Arnold, Lee Griggs manipulates photographs to take on sculptural forms that look convincingly 3D. His new series, “Deformations,” takes a studio portrait of an anonymous man and warps it into geometric shapes. In each portrait, his skull stretches into a cube, an enormous sphere, or a cone. Rather grotesquely, Griggs captures the way the surface of the skin would stretch tautly over this unusual skeletal architecture, making the man’s face contort into pained grimaces in the process. Check out some of Griggs’ work below.

by Nathan SpoorPosted on

Nature and the creatures that inhabit its delicate world have always been a fascinating subject for Scott Musgrove (previously covered in HF Vol. 2, 8, 24 and online). With a big solo exhibition coming up at Jonathan LeVine Gallery in New York on May 16, we discovered that he has been quite busy, and not only with producing paintings and sculptures. He also recently became a father. As he put the finishing touches on his new work, Musgrove took a few moments to share his thoughts on parenthood, competitive bike racing, and, of course, the balancing act of family and making art. Read the exclusive interview below.