by Andy SmithPosted on


Whether on the cover of the New Yorker, inside graphic novels, or adorning street corners, the images of Eric Drooker can be seen across the world. The New York City native has garnered a reputation as a social critic, with illustrations that comment on topics like police brutality, censorship, and the deaths of icons like Prince.

by Margot BuermannPosted on


Every year, on the first Sunday of September, the Dutch village of Zundert holds its “Bloemencorso Zundert”, or “Zundert Flower Parade”, featuring larger-than-life floats and an “explosion” of flowers. The giant structures, reaching up to 30 feet tall, are built by volunteers in neighboring village districts and church villages – each one competing for the title of best design. Read a brief history of the parade and view more photos behind the cut.

by Andy SmithPosted on


The fanciful drawings of Sam Branton often feature pastoral landscapes and wild animals, co-existing in situations that seem ripped out of storybooks. The soft-edged, yet detailed style of his pencil adds a surreal quality to the work. “I would like the drawings to appear to be, at first glance, as an old cartoon, perhaps an illustration of a fable or a mythological story,“ the artist said, in an interview with Antlers Gallery last year.

by Andy SmithPosted on

The warped and surreal nature of Paul Kaptein’s sculptures are even more startling when you consider the medium: Kaptein hand-carves each piece from wood. And the “glitchy” aspect of the works is heightened by gaps and holes present throughout, in a sense emptying the figures of their worldliness. And with names like, “With the Poise of One Entering a Black Hole for the Third Time” (shown above), there’s both a humor and cosmic quality to the Australian artist’s work. Kaptein was last featured on HiFructose.com here.

by Margot BuermannPosted on


In her paintings and ink drawings of anthropomorphous forms, Belarusian artist Alina Kunitsyna shares her personal fascination with people, and the ways in which we can simultaneously conceal and express our inward nature. Her series portrays figures obscured within garments, blankets and decorative fabrics, their faces always hidden from our view. And while her subjects may carry an air of mystery, it is through the expressions of their outer shells that we may begin to gain access to their inner worlds.

by Andy SmithPosted on

After visiting the Chinese village where generations of his family had lived, sculptor Warren King decided on an ambitious, new body of work: One individual at a time, he would recreate the residents of his grandparents’ community using just cardboard and glue. The life-sized figures help the artist connect with his cultural and ancestral heritages, each its own emotion and moment in time. The backs of the figures are exposed, allowing the viewer to see their interworkings and hinting at the unfinished nature of history.