by Andy SmithPosted on

Mark Mulroney’s acrylics paintings humor and unsettle in their comic-inspired style and surreal sensibilities. These vibrant works pull from Pop and art history, which in many cases, carry near-aggressive results. In a show at Mrs. Gallery in New York, “The Dangers of Eden,” new pieces by the artists are shown.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Kate Zambrano’s new paintings adorn found objects, shifting in tone and representing an evolution for the artist. Her work is part of an upcoming show at Modern Eden Gallery, “RE/FORM,” in which she disassembles the human form. The show runs Oct. 13-Nov. 2 at the San Francisco gallery.

by Andy SmithPosted on


In Stuart Holland‘s charcoal drawings, reality is questioned through massive architecture and solitary figures. There’s both a cerebral and magical quality to these scenes, vague in its ties to actual reality. The gray values in his drawings, whether rendering abstract or geometric forms, add to their psychological nature.

by Andy SmithPosted on

This issue’s features include: the poetic figurative paintings of Lukifer Aurelius, the glitchy narrative mayhem of Ori Toor, The bold graphic paintings of Hilda Palafox, the ornate sculptures of Beth Katleman, the outrageous paintings of cover feature Erik Parker, the intricate drawings of Ben Tolman, art history and the reluctant realism of F. Scott Hess, and the new sculptures and paintings by Amy Sol, as well as a special report on the hand painted (and uber violent) movie posters of Ghana. Plus: a Special 16-page insert section dedicated to previewing the Hi-Fructose Presents: the Art of the Mushroom show and more. Subscribe or order a copy today. See more previews after the jump.

by Andy SmithPosted on

In Yuanxing Liang’s folkloric sculptures, the hair of his figures become their own whimsical landscapes. Liang, formerly a game character designer, is now a full time artist, often working within fantastical figurative sculpture. Many have noted the challenge of displaying his work, as each pieces comes fully realized and detailed, 360 degrees of intricate notes from the artist.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Damon Soule’s dazzling, psychedelic mixed-media work has seen major evolutions during the past 20 years. In a new retrospective show at Mirus Gallery in Denver, we see those progressions in vivid detail. The show runs Oct. 6 through Nov. 14 at the gallery. Soule was the cover artists for Hi-Fructose Vol. 17.