by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

“I think that there is a lot to point out, and to work against in daily life, particularly with respect to American culture,” said Dane Patterson in an interview with Art Plural Gallery, where he had his last solo show in 2013. “We are creatures of habit and we can quickly fall into routine. We’re rarely aware of the way we compartmentalize everything in our lives, or have had things defined and compartmentalized for us.” His graphite drawings begin as documentations of daily life — but they evolve into strange hybrids of images intended to stir up the ritualistic qualities of our mundane existence. Patterson works from photographs in a process he describes as sculptural. First, he stages a scene, shoots it, and then combine the resulting photographic image with other sourced material to create a meticulous, surreal pencil drawing on paper.

by Sasha BogojevPosted on

Ukrainian artist duo Interesni Kazki teamed up with Studio Cromie from Grotagglie, Italy for their solo show “Inter Arma Silent Musae.” The show features new ink drawings and paintings created over the last couple of months. This exhibition is a rare opportunity to see studio works by Waone and Aec, who are better known for the fairytale-like murals they’ve painted everywhere from Mexico to India. “Inter Arma Silent Musae” was staged in an impressive tomb-like interior of Bottega Papocchia and their fantastical, detailed works felt at home on these antiquated stone walls.

by James ScarboroughPosted on

Taiwan-born artist Chen Dao Lee’s creates ambiguous narratives of unresolved tensions. His style is nearly photorealistically perfect. His compositions are taut and vigorous. If the light in his work made a noise, it would be loud and blaring. It’s his choice of subject that makes the work provocative. Each piece features young, beautiful, semi-clad women with garish red hair. Some hold automatic weapons. Some wrestle with each other. Some engage in sexual escapades with other women. Some do so with other men. These women are young, beautiful, and… bored.

by Soojin ChangPosted on

Last Rites Gallery in New York City opened two solo shows — Richard J. Oliver’s “Elements” and Stefano Alcantara’s “Waqayñan,” two concurrent interpretations of a journey — this past Saturday. Oliver’s works, which sprawled across the longest of the gallery’s walls, mark a personal evolution of the artist’s practice, specifically, as a departure away from his former foreboding narrative paintings and closer to the ebullience that has come over him in recent years.

by Sasha BogojevPosted on

Chinese-born, South Africa-based artist DALeast was recently in Poland painting a new mural for the Street Art Doping mural festival in Warsaw. This is one of the few murals he has painted as of late, as he has been focusing on studio work this year. DAL’s distinctive style evolved from his effort to paint large pieces without using much paint, a technique he came up with back in his homeland. As time went on, this technique became his unique, recognizable signature.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

British artist Joe Fenton infuses his immensely detailed graphite and mixed-media drawings of interplanetary iconography with inspiration from religious artifacts from centuries past — the ornate frames of gilded Orthodox icons, Tibetan Buddhist altars with their elaborate wood carvings. East and West come together in these large, fantastical works. Fenton is an award-winning children’s book author and illustrator, but his personal work tackles heavier topics. The artist says that much of his drawings explore the idea of death, namely the fear of death — an anxiety many appease through religion and spirituality. Fenton’s baroque, intense scenes are cramped with hellish visions and strange spirits, densely filling each page with deities and demons from a fantasy belief system rife with occult symbols.