by Andy SmithPosted on

The “street interventions” of Belgium-based stencil artist Jaune put sanitation workers in strange, often humorous situations on walls across the world, using the contours and features of each site for inspiration. For many, the stencil work recalls the public work of practitioners like Banksy and Blew le Rat. His specific usage of sanitation workers, however, comes from personal experience.

by Andy SmithPosted on


Chiharu Shiota has called her thread installations “drawings in space.” Using antique furniture and other objects evoking memory, her work has explored how we’re tethered to the past and each other. Shiota’s work, and her performance art, has recently taken over spaces at KODE-Art Museum of Bergen in Norway, Museum Nikolaikirche in Berlin, Kenji Taki Gallery in Japan, and SCAD Museum of Art in Georgia. The artist was last featured on HiFructose.com here.

by Andy SmithPosted on


Oil painter Joel Rea crafts surreal, modern narratives that create confrontations between man and nature. The artist, living and working in Australia, designs allegories that speak to the fragility and power of either side.He most recently had an exhibition at Mitchell Fine Art in Brisbane titled “Outsider.” Rea last appeared on HiFructose.com here.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Cristina Córdova’s stirring ceramic sculptures explore the iconography of differing cultures and social ideas while tethering all of humankind. At varying scales, these pieces are striking in their confrontations with the viewers, recalling both the familiar and a broad spirituality in their execution. Each of the figurative pieces contain multiple explorations, the artist says.

by Andy SmithPosted on


Oslo-based artist Marianne Gretteberg Engedal, also known as “Skinkeape,” crafts illustrations that often focus on humorously proportioned men and houseplants. The artist’s muted palettes push the surrealism of each work even further, as well as her tendency to allow erased lines to become part of the final product. The works are deceptive in their simplicity, the artist’s knack for texture and framing surfacing through the humor of each scene.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Jamian Juliano-Villani’s surreal, unsettling narratives are rendered in acrylics, implementing both brush and airbrush techniques. Found in these scenes are icons of popular culture and Western living, presented in ways that invoke examination, chuckles, and every so often, a bit of recoiling.