by Andy SmithPosted on

Patricia Traub’s oil paintings exist at the intersection of art and activism. These works attempt to humanize her animal subjects, in a way that showcases both their inherent beauty and rights to live in the world untortured. In her group portraits, in particular, she places animals and humans among each other in a way that emits harmony and equation of value.

by Andy SmithPosted on


A new stop-motion short film takes influence from the work of Hi-Fructose Vol. 41 cover artist Greg “Craola” Simkins. The 5-minute “I’m Scared,” directed by Pete Levin, is a whimsical, yet gripping children’s tale put into motion. The C4toons Entertainment short’s models adapt the exaggerated style and content created by the Los Angeles-based artist into the narrative’s characters.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Michele Oka Doner‘s long career has produced bold sculpture, works on paper, and public art that engrosses in both its appreciation of the natural world and innovation. Her figurative works, in specific, use partially formed and seemingly organic parts to inspire awe. Many named for gods and goddesses, these particular works feel at once godly and incomplete or reflections of our limitations.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Painter Hiroomi Ito uses traditional means to produce contemporary scenes and ideas. And he takes this process further than just creating his own color pigments; he actually creates the rice paper on which his works are crafted. In these works, Ito explores modern social issues as they relate to customs of the past.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Nick Ervinck, a Belgian artist, creates studio sculptures and massive installations that take modern approaches to manipulating material and space. The artist’s work can distort the familiar or create something wholly new in this process. He uses surprising sources in crafting his imagery and textures, from organisms found in nature (both prehistoric and current) to inkblots, Japanese pop culture, and our own bodies.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Eddy Kamuanga Ilunga, a painter based in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, crafts oil and acrylic works that blend traditional iconography and technological symbology. In particular, the Illunga series “Mangbetu” comments on a native culture coerced into modernization, as the region is an exporter of material used in computer chips.