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Yasuto Sasada

IKEA presents ART EVENT 2017, a limited edition collection of twelve posters each featuring the artwork of twelve diverse artists from around the world. For this third installment of ART EVENT, IKEA put all attention to hand drawings from both emerging as well as established artists such as such as Jean Jullien, Amandine Uruty, Steven Harrington and Yasuto Sasada. The posters are available in limited quantity for only a few more weeks or while supply last. Here today, gone tomorrow. Don’t miss out on the opportunity to grab great art. IKEA: ART EVENT 2017

by Andy SmithPosted on

Jocelyn Y. Howard, a ceramics sculptor, creates surreal figures that explore identity, gender, and other social topics. Howard immersed herself in ceramics after studying under Michael Sherrill in 2005. Since, she’s amassed a collection of strange and absorbing characters, all reflecting both the potential and otherworldliness of the material.

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João Ruas, a painter based in São Paulo, Brazil, crafts ghostly, surreal scenes that blend mythology, warfare, and nature. Even his most peaceful works carry a mystery and sense of recent danger. In a new show at Jonathan Levine Gallery, titled “Geist,” the artist evolves these themes and process. The show kicks off May 13 and runs through June 10.

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Do Ho Suh’s installations and works on paper use silk and thread to create architectural wonders. Other times, his site-specific work has included entire houses, built, slanted, and placed in odd places to explore the concept of space and home.

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Andi Soto, a Panama-based artist, uses ink, graphite, prismacolor pencils, gel pens, and other materials to create her intricate figures, often bare and seemingly vulnerable. Soto often removes flesh and other elements while adorning her female characters with head-dressings. Yet, the parts that remain are rendered in absorbing and detailed linework. In the past, the artist has described her style as “knitting with ink.”

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From certain angles, works by Noah Scalin can just look like piles and piles of clothes strewn along the floor. But at the right angle, absorbing portraits come into focus. Recent subjects include Hellen Keller, Maggie L. Walker, and others. The length of these sculptures can comprise around 30 feet. His work explores “the theme of transience – specifically the temporary nature of our individual lives and tenuous nature of human existence on the planet.”