by Andy SmithPosted on

Megan Buccere, an artist and teacher who lives in Baton Rouge, La., uses soft pastels and oils to tell stories. Her surreal works move between conveying beauty and the unsettling imagery of figures bound in strings or discombobulated. These narratives aren’t always clear, but seem to convey bouts with identity and dialogues between the mind and reality.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Boston-born, London-based painter Phil Hale crafts distressed, dynamic works in which figures are conveyed in action and anguish. His nighttime backdrops are particularly absorbing, with shadows both enveloping and dramatizing the scenes. Hale’s work is decidedly confrontational and relational, in contrast with figurative painting that focuses on quiet, somber moments. In fact, several of Hale’s paintings seem to be convergences of multiple scenes. Hale was last mentioned on HiFructose.com here.

by Andy SmithPosted on


Scott Tulay is an artist and architect based in Amherst, Mass., crafting ghostly drawings that play with light, shadow, and a distorted version of familiar structures. Tulay’s command of space and design bring an engrossing order to his otherwise otherworldly creations. And whether it’s ink, charcoal, pastel, graphite, or a combination of all, his drawings offer vibrant arrangements that loom like vivid apparitions.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Javier Arres, an illustrator and graphic designer living in Madrid, Spain, crafts animated GIFs that often depict hyperdetailed, fantastical machines. The artist has his own moniker for these animations: “visual toys.” Whether it’s a wild coffee-maker or a roving entertainment bus, the artist builds GIFs that require dozens of loops to fully comprehend.

by Andy SmithPosted on

New York City-based artist Daniel Bilodeau creates work that blends traditional still-life and figure studies with postmodern, existential displacement. These are works that feel as though once complete, were re-arranged by the hands of another creator. There are traces of traditional Dutch still-life in Bilodeau’s works, but there’s also a contemporary, graphical quality to the work, which in its dissonance, offers physical and psychological complexity.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Aurora Robson, a Toronto-born, New York-based multimedia artist, is known for taking discarded materials like plastic bottles, tinted polyacrylic, rivets, and cables and transform them into seemingly organic sculptures. Or as the artist states on her website, Robson’s work focuses on “intercepting the waste stream.”