by Andy SmithPosted on

Stickymonger” is the moniker of Brooklyn-based artist Joohee Park. Cutting giant sheets of vinyl, the artist installs her pop-influenced works piece by piece. These stickers reflect a range of emotions, from anxiety and prejudice to a decidedly darker aspect of the artist.

by Andy SmithPosted on


David Jien’s works on paper and sculptures blend modern pop culture and video games with historical iconography and imagery. These hyperdetailed works can feel both mythological and like a Nintendo RPG. The Los Angeles-based artist uses colored pencil and graphite on his paper works, along with occasional use of holographic film and other elements that add to their otherworldly nature.

by Andy SmithPosted on

At first glance, the Kaitlyn Schwalje sculpture “Unfit for Consumption” appears to tell a parable of some sort. The top of the piece scene seems serene, with grazing boars and a strange liquid form taking shape. Yet, a more ominous narrative forms when one looks below. The truth is that Schwalje’s sculpture has even stranger, yet real-world origins.

by Andy SmithPosted on


Famed sculptor/installation artist Richard Wilson creates “architectural interventions,” in which otherwise everyday building faces and structures are shifted in dreamlike fashion. Through brilliant engineering, the artist takes the elements of our day-to-day experience inside and outside in ways that may seem impossible at first glance.

by Andy SmithPosted on


Artist Niels Corfitzen toys with light and abstraction to create surreal portraits. The blemishes strewn across his works appear as both analog and digital distortion, offering both a vulnerability and mystery to the figures he depicts. Often, his work plays on both outdoors backdrops and flashes of culture.

by Andy SmithPosted on

John Jacobsmeyer’s oil paintings on aluminum recall nostalgic and imaginative experience, using wooden backdrops and technology-inspired shapes. These works at once feel aged and modern, and while humor runs throughout his recent works, several ring of sincerity and vulnerability. And a few others have skeleton warriors. Jacobsmeyer has cited Gene Roddenberry, Nietzsche, David Lynch, and Mary Shelley as influences.