by CaroPosted on

Now on view, Mab Graves’ exhibition “Spectrum” at Auguste Clown Gallery manifests her inspirations with adventurous new themes and characters. The most prominent is the retro doll character with Big Eyes, Blythe, reinvented in Graves’ world as a goddess and a ray-gun shooting explorer with a carefree spunk. Her storybook animal sidekicks are right out of Aesop’s Fables like The Tortoise and the Hare, and other tales with important life lessons.

by CaroPosted on

Rainbow-colored mannequin legs, animal bones, skulls, and gold- these are just a few of the materials used in John Breed’s eclectic installations. If his choice of medium sounds frenzied, it might stem from his creative background. Now based in the Netherlands, Breed received training from a calligraphy master in Kyoto, Japan, before he moved to New York to take on graffiti, paint frescos in Rome, and study landscape painting in China. A world traveler and natural born experimenter, every piece that Breed creates is a culmination of his extensive skill set.

by Nathan SpoorPosted on

Miami-based painter Juan Travieso brings his work to life with vivid colors out of a sense of necessity. In his early days as a child in Cuba, his access to art supplies was limited because of the country’s trade restrictions. As a result, Travieso has a deep appreciation for color and takes advantage of the hues available to him with his full-spectrum palette. His oil and acrylic paintings on canvas often feature geometric forms interacting with birds and other animals. Travieso uses this juxtaposition of realism and design to draw attention to the adverse effects human activity has had on nature. He views each painting as a chance to give voice to the powerless and endangered species on our planet. We spoke to Travieso about the ideas behind his paintings, as well as his artistic evolution.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Opening April 21 at Galleria Patricia Armocida in Milan, Agostino Iacurci’s solo show “Appearance and Disappearance” features new paintings and assemblages that riff on the artist’s signature characters. Iacurci’s designs of these anonymous figures have a graphic sensibility: Their faces are composed of simplified, geometric forms that typically come in red, black, and blue. For “Appearance and Disappearance,” Iacurci breaks down these figures further, using their forms as a structure for introducing surreal visuals. In the weeks leading up to the show, he also put up two enormous, hand-painted billboards that tower over the Cadorna Square and Loreto Square, two highly-trafficked points of Milan.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

On April 24, Paradigm Gallery + Studio in Philadelphia will debut two solo shows that explore humans’ connection to nature: Nicomi Nix Turner’s “No God for a Wanderer” and Sarah Louise Davey’s “The Garden of No Distant Place.” While Davey works in clay and Turner, in pencil, the two artists share a common interest in feminine, nymph-like characters that seem to belong in the wild.

by CaroPosted on

This Saturday, Merry Karnowsky gallery will exhibit 17 new works from their roster with “Aggregate”. The exhibition is part of the gallery’s expansion as the KP Projects, here celebrating their collaboration with Zero+ Publishing. Curated by founder Kirk Pedersen, the show is a unique gathering that includes Andrew Hem, Edwin Ushiro, Augustine Kofie, Yumiko Kayukawa, Lisa Adams, Mercedes Helnwein, Blaine Fontana, and Dabs Myla, to name a few. Together, their paintings embody an adventurous spirit that is in tune with their editions, also on display.