by Andy SmithPosted on


The billowed rugs and other objects in Antonio Santin’s ghostly oil paintings are rendered with unsettling realism. The Madrid native works in “elaborate still-lifes,” as he alters his subjects to create new realities. The artist taps into the tradition of Spanish Tenebrism and a sculptural background to dream up and execute these works on canvas. When photographed from a distance, the work still turns heads, with the viewer attempting to understand what he or she is seeing. He was featured in Hi-Fructose Vol. 18 and was last featured on HiFructose.com here.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Huang Po Hsun’s vibrant, bombastic paintings move between the familiar and the utterly otherworldly. These works, primarily acrylic on canvas, can feel like underwater carnivals or bubbling abstractions. The artist seems to be retrofitting icons from our world into his own flamboyant dreams.

by Andy SmithPosted on


Marina Muun, an artist living in London, crafts surreal, stylized worlds in her illustrations. In both her personal and editorial work, the artist blends techniques to make dreamlike imagery out of her ideas.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Patricia Traub’s oil paintings exist at the intersection of art and activism. These works attempt to humanize her animal subjects, in a way that showcases both their inherent beauty and rights to live in the world untortured. In her group portraits, in particular, she places animals and humans among each other in a way that emits harmony and equation of value.

by Andy SmithPosted on


A new stop-motion short film takes influence from the work of Hi-Fructose Vol. 41 cover artist Greg “Craola” Simkins. The 5-minute “I’m Scared,” directed by Pete Levin, is a whimsical, yet gripping children’s tale put into motion. The C4toons Entertainment short’s models adapt the exaggerated style and content created by the Los Angeles-based artist into the narrative’s characters.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Michele Oka Doner‘s long career has produced bold sculpture, works on paper, and public art that engrosses in both its appreciation of the natural world and innovation. Her figurative works, in specific, use partially formed and seemingly organic parts to inspire awe. Many named for gods and goddesses, these particular works feel at once godly and incomplete or reflections of our limitations.