by CaroPosted on

Miami based artist Axel Void often portrays shocking and dark imagery in his Classically inspired paintings. For his new series of 8 oil paintings, which debuted last night at BC Gallery in Berlin, the artist took a visual cue from something as every day as plastic wrap. His images are unpleasant to look at as his subjects endure beneath the plastic, but they do not appear to be afraid or in any kind of pain. The artist’s use of plastic can be perceived in different ways. In the case of food, it may represent protection and preservation or eroticism and pleasure, as in the asphyxiation of oneself. According to his exhibition statement, “This show gives emphasis to that confusion and state of wellbeing within our basic necessities, and longing for something else.”

by CaroPosted on

Patricia Piccinini is an Australian artist known for her unsettling sculptures of hyperrealistic hybrid creatures. Her work began as a review of biotechnology such as genetic manipulation, but has developed an emotional context over the years. For example, in her sculpture “The Long Awaited”, Piccinini seeks to form a relationship between the creatures and viewer on an empathetic level. The piece is currently on display in her exhibit “Relativity”, the first major survey of the artist’s sculptural works in Europe coinciding with Galway International Arts Festival.

by CaroPosted on

Stephen Romano Gallery in Brooklyn has assembled a rather eerie exhibition in cooperation with Morbid Anatomy Museum that pairs contemporary works with a wide variety of vernacular photography, folk sculpture, spirit photography, and more. “OPUS HYPNAGOGIA: Sacred Spaces of the Visionary and Vernacular” takes a look at creative enlightenment over the centuries, and explores our ongoing fascination with mental phenomena like Hypnagogia. On display will be recent works by the likes of Martin Wittfooth (HF Vol. 19 cover artist), Kris Kuksi (first covered in HF Vol. 19), Caitlin McCormack, El Gato Chimney, Rithika Merchant, and Hunter Stabler whose creations share a surreal quality or supernatural theme.

by CaroPosted on

Swedish artist Susanna Hesselberg’s latest work plummets deep into the ground Alice-in-Wonderland-style. “When My Father Died It Was Like a Whole Library Had Burned Down” (named after Laurie Anderson’s song “World Without End”) is a mind bending reproduction of a library inherited by the artist from her father, created for Denmark’s Sculpture by the Sea exhibition series. The biennial festival, which closed on July 5th, boasted 56 site specific installations along the Danish coast. Hesselberg’s mysterious contribution is vertical tunnel framed by a piece of glass that allows viewers to peer into a dark tower books only visible by their spines. Hesselberg wanted to recreate the depth of loss or losing control, as one might experience when a loved one dies.

by Jessica RossPosted on

This past weekend, Heron Arts debuted “Ass Kicking Contest” (previewed here), a father-son art show from acclaimed artist Wayne White and his son, Woodrow White. A complete spectacle of installation and fine art, the duo presented their respective bodies of work alongside a few massive puppets. The result was a varied display of kitsch and charm. Always finding ways to insert humor into his work, you can see Wayne’s excitement in the large-scale puppets that inhabit the space. They draw back to his time as set designer for Pee Wee’s Playhouse, where he received three Emmys for his innovative work. Bringing him back to his roots as a DIY craftsman and puppet-maker, Wayne’s figures range everywhere from a cubist bust resting along a mirror to an operational 15ft reclining cowboy trying to get his boot on.

by Nathan SpoorPosted on

Luke O’Sullivan (previously featured here) creates three dimensional art that brings the worlds of drawing and sculpture together. Inspired by dystopian science fiction films, O’Sullivan builds environments composed of peculiar buildings and subterranean lairs. Using textured façades as well as screen-printed surfaces, his latest series of works entitled “Cool Shelter” creates a fantastical scene of overworld and underworld labyrinths. The artist will present his latest series on Friday, July 24th at Paradigm Gallery in Philadelphia, PA. Hi-Fructose was invited to have a special exclusive preview into Luke O’Sullivan’s latest layered industrial landscapes.