by Andy SmithPosted on


Trey Abdella’s wild acrylic paintings are packed with strange dreamscapes and pop culture iconography. Much of his work is built around the idea of a “shrine,” a makeshift monument to the various stages of growth and social reference points.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Hi-Fructose co-founder Daniel “Attaboy” Seifert offers a new collection of work in a show at Corey Helford Gallery next month. Seifert says that in creating the pieces for “Grow in the Dark,” he was “building paintings,” layering several pieces of wood into 2.5D reliefs. The show kicks off Dec. 2 and runs through Jan. 6. This collection, with themes of mortality, mutation, and rebirth, is the artist’s first show in several years.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Crystal Wagner’s otherworldly installations are both spellbinding and unsettling. The works resemble something organic, yet are constructed from paper, wire, wood, paint, sealant, and other materials. Her recent pieces are part of the new show “Dimensions of Three” at Allouche Gallery in New York City, along with Martin Gremse and Reinoud Oudshoorn. The show starts Nov. 30 and runs through Dec. 31. The artist was featured in Hi-Fructose Vol. 41, and she last appeared on our website here.

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Mexico-born artist Salvador Jiménez-Flores uses several approaches to delve into identity and the convergence of cultures. A recent project in particular, titled “The Resistance of the Hybrid Cacti,” uses ceramics to look at these concepts and more. The artist says that “through art, I seek to resist the labels put upon me and other people of color by reimagining what an alternative future could look like.”

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No matter the materials used, Amber Ma can craft a whimsical, absorbing narrative. The New York City-based illustrator uses her experience under China’s one-child policy as an influence in her works. She’s worked in watercolors, Sumi ink, pen, and as evidenced above, colored pencil.

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The sculptures of Yoshitoshi Kanemaki bend and distort the human form. Often using the repetition of facial features as a means to explore the endless emotions contained within a subject, his use of wood adds a complexity to both the texture of his figures and the skill required. The artist was featured in Hi-Fructose Vol. 38 and he last appeared on HiFructose.com here.