by Andy SmithPosted on

Scott Radke‘s carved figures teem with creepiness and absorbing detail. He offers a collection of new characters in the show “Home at Last” at Haven Gallery in Long Island, New York. The show’s figures evolve Radke’s longstanding fascination with the unsettling, each new work carrying both grace and a sense of magic. He was last featured on HiFructose.com here.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Italian artist Millo creates enormous murals that often contain scenes of wonder with young subjects. (The artist was last featured on HiFructose.com here.) We recently asked the artist about his process and why he works with such large-scale canvases. Check out our Q&A below.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Felicia Chiao, a self-described “industrial designer by day and illustrator by night,” crafts drawings of humorous and fantastical scenes, packed with vibrant details. Her signature bald, naked protagonist seems to be a stand-in for all of us, taking in the wonder or other range of emotions in each piece.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Linda Cordell’s ceramic sculptures offer familiar creatures and figures, yet many carry a darker edge. Much of Cordell’s work depicts the animal kingdom, in varying states of tension or external conflict. Most sculptures carry the natural color of porcelain, with pops of bright hues that mark points of interest (or impact, depending on the piece).

by Andy SmithPosted on

Mexico City artist Hilda Palafox, also known as “Poni,” crafts absorbing illustrations that often contain the female form. The artist says, “Girls, love, rain, and music are my biggest inspirations.” And whether it’s on paper, ceramic, acrylic, or adorning a wall, her work reflects those elements.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Photographer Karen Jerzyk creates surreal works that use often overlooked spaces and themes of both horror and the fantastic. Despite what seems like a complex narrative in each piece, the artist insists that each photo is open to interpretation. She simply aims to invoke “thought and emotion.”