by Roxanne GoldbergPosted on

Think twice when accepting a dinner invention from Melis Buyruk. The Turkish artist’s sleek, white porcelain is elegant and expertly crafted. However, you won’t find vases and figurines in Buyruk’s studio. Instead, clean white dishes are plated with life-like hands, hearts and ears. To accent the pure forms, Buyruk adds minute golden flies.

by CaroPosted on

Buenos Aires, Argentina based artist Victoria Baraga uses unique materials to create her surreal landscape paintings. Working in mainly oils on non-permeable surfaces such as photographic paper or glass, she is able to evoke the illusion of shape, movement and dimension. Baraga creates textures with paper and other objects to the effect of decalcomania or East Asian ink wash painting.

by Nathan SpoorPosted on

Meghan Howland is an oil painter currently working from her studio in Portland, Maine. With a pragmatic approach to creating, Howland shares with Hi-Fructose that painting allows her to express herself in ways that words simply cannot. While painting, she reflects on human spirituality and nature by studying the relationship of humanity to other organisms. Join us now as we get an exclusive look into Meghan Howland’s latest paintings, as well as a few of her thoughts about them.

by CaroPosted on

José Luis Torres is an Argentinean artist currently living in Quebec who builds largescale works out of salvaged objects. He’s set up public art installations and sculptures all over the world, using everything from antique doors, window panes, to assemblages of brightly colored plastic as his materials. Often, his works have an overflowing effect as they burst from existing environments and architectural structures. His latest work entitled “Overflows” is a part of the 2015 Passages Insolites (Unusual Passages) event in Quebec City’s Old Port.

by Roxanne GoldbergPosted on

Chilean artist Jose Romussi adds embroidery to paper photographs to extracts a third dimension, and thus a nascent personality, out of an otherwise flat image. By doing so, Romussi opens space for alternative interpretations and methods of viewing a staged image. The artist refers to his work as an “intervention,” and in many ways, his intentions are similar to other contemporary artists who use yarn as a method of interrupting the norm. Like “Yarn Bombing,” which is often performed as a softer act of graffiti in public places, Romussi’s compositions attempt to re-define notions of beauty while simultaneously drawing attention to social issues, such as the re-appropriation of African patterns and other non-Western traditions in high fashion.

by CaroPosted on

New York based artist Craig LaRotonda creates multimedia works in a unique style reminiscent of Renaissance and Byzantine art. His detailed and layered paintings have a darkness that is matched by his sculptural pieces that look like religious relics. Opening September 4th, he will exhibit a new series of paintings and sculptures in “A Consortium of Lost Souls” at Stranger Factory in New Mexico.