by Jessica RossPosted on

The on-going conversation about San Francisco’s transforming social landscape is one full of shared bitterness and tension. In a city where any given conversation begins with the baseline grievances of high rents, gutted arts programs and the overall influx of wealth and monopolizing industries, it’s no wonder people are frustrated. With that said, one nonprofit is hoping to make a positive impact. Art City, founded by former techie Luke Groesbeck, is a cultural establishment bent on retooling the perspective of San Francisco’s citizens by implementing a month-long public art program. Teaming up with local curators Tova Lobatz and Jenny Sharaf, Way Out West sets out to replace commercial advertising spaces with striking contemporary artworks.

by CaroPosted on

Pablo Picasso once said, “There is no abstract art. You must always start with something. Afterward you can remove all traces of reality.” And while art has evolved dramatically, the classic fundamental of anatomy remains the same. Czech sculptor Monika Horčicová creates ornate installations with polyester resin skeletons as her medium. Some might call her work morbid, others a beautiful reimagining and application of the human form. Her technique requires a keen understanding of anatomy before she can manipulate it- and her work is not just an abstraction. She’s walking a line between natural construction and purely artistic expression. Take a look after the jump!

by CaroPosted on

When we first posted elusive Queensland artist Lisa Adams, nobody had seen a painting from her in a year because she was quietly collecting new inspiration. She is now putting the finishing touches on her upcoming exhibition at Philip Bacon Galleries, opening November 25th. Adams treats her paintings as a memoir, created chronologically, where making memories is part of the process. Her story is vested in her images. In anticipation of her next show, we take a look back at her work over the years.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Kiev-based photographer Oleg Oprisco’s works modify small details in their real-world settings to convey the essence of fantasy. It is as if his photos give off the fresh, dewy aroma of a wild escape to a desolate countryside that seems to belong to no specific time or place. In one piece, a girl holds up a rolled-up piece of a grassy lawn. Though anyone could do this in real life, in the photograph she seems to wield a sort of power over the land with her powerful, summoning gaze. In another, a model holds a stained umbrella that briefly gives the impression of a multi-colored rain shower before Oprisco’s process of dousing the set in paint gives itself away. These small details invite viewers to indulge Oprisco’s innocent, storybook-like fantasies.

by Victoria Casal-DataPosted on

Korean artist Yong Ho Ji creates animal/human hybrids made out of recycled tires. Ji calls his variations “mutants” in order to refer to both their hybrid forms and their recycled medium. “My concept is mutation,” Ji says, “the end product is technically from nature; it is made from the white sap of latex trees but here it has changed. The color is black and the look is scary.”

by Amelia Taylor-HochbergPosted on

Despite the meticulous control and calculated perspectives, Canadian artist Adam Lupton’s oil paintings are constantly fidgeting. They mostly feature youth in various incarnations in a blur of motion represented as simultaneous frames, or with different layers of paint exposed. This jitteriness is revealed both through substance, by showing the layers of material creation, or through time, as the viewer pans multiple freeze-frames overlaid on top of each other. What stands still throughout all his work is an obsession with time and chaos, and the individual’s navigation of the two in the constant present.