by Andy SmithPosted on

Mark Ollinger, a Calgary-born artist, explores communication with his mindbending studies on the elements of language. In both his sculptures and paintings, the architecture of letters and and interlocking forms engross in several perspectives. In several of the artist’s public works, these pieces are hidden in corners, crevices, and underneath structures, as puzzles to be unlocked through urban exploration. These works can be found in places across the world.

by Andy SmithPosted on


Swiss artist Urs Fischer, based in New York, adapts the human face into topographical forms in his paintings. Works like “Landscape,” above, are crafted from aluminum panel, reinforced polyurethane foam, epoxy, acrylic ink, primer, paint, and silkscreen, and gesso. These paintings reorganize visages into landscapes, with the artist’s own face used in differing ways. The recent show “Mind Moves,” erected at Gagosian Gallery in San Francisco, was accompanied by a quote from the artist: “At its core, art is all about order. When you’re an artist, you basically arrange, rearrange, or alter; you play off order.”

by Andy SmithPosted on

The handcrafted works of Rebeka Elizegi, a collage artist based in Barcelona, Spain, come in varying sizes and scopes. And much of Elizegi’s work involves the female figure, along with the topics of “generic diversity and sexual ambiguity,” according to the artist. The artist says that she’s often fascinated by what the observer interprets from her surreal works, with much of the visuals intentionally garnering differing takes.

by Andy SmithPosted on

This year, the most popular posts on HiFructose.com invited us inside subway cars packed by monsters, navigated inverted architecture, and showed us a world of giant textile birds. We revisited established artists charting new territory like Robert Crumb and Rebecca Leveille and burgeoning, young talent breaking through. It was a year of both the vibrant and the somber, hether it was Daniel Merriam’s whimsical watercolors Yusk Imai’s monochrome bodypainting. We escaped in dreamlike worlds and felt sobering reflections of our time. As of December 31, these were the most visited pieces offered, so we take a moment to acknowledge some of the most fascinating work and conversations we had this year. As always, we thank you for reading our daily blog posts and quarterly print issues. And we look forward to another year of exploring what 2017 brings with you.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Italy-born painter Fulvio Di Piazza offers a new collection of oil works on canvas in the new exhibit “Entangled” at Jonathan Levine Gallery in January. The solo show kicks off on Jan. 7 and runs through Jan. 28. Di Piazza was featured in Hi-Fructose Vol. 25 and the exhibit “Turn the Page: The First Ten Years of Hi-Fructose,” a collaboration between the magazine and Virginia MOCA.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Sculptor Katie Grinnan first unveiled the sculpture “Mirage” in 2011, offering an exploration of movement and space. Constructed from friendly plastic, sand, and enamel, the piece first debuted as part of an exhibition at Brennan & Griffin. The piece is actually a cast of Grinnan’s own body, set in various poses during a yoga routine. The work also calls back to Hindu art, in which gods display several limbs and omnipresence.