by CaroPosted on

Tracey Snelling is currently featured in our Turn the Page: The First Ten Years of Hi-Fructose exhibition at Virginia MOCA, Imagining Home at the Baltimore Museum of Art, and soon at Volta Basel, opening this week. We caught up with her to talk about her new works, which collectively offer psychedelic versions of places, as in her recreation of strip clubs, as well as her own criticisms, expressed in “Shoot It!”, a commentary on gun rights in America.

by Andy SmithPosted on

It’s easy to get lost in the arresting vision of Mike Worrall, who was last mentioned on Hi-Fructose in this 2014 piece. But maybe lost is the wrong word, as there is a definitive space viewers inhabit as they look upon works like “The Lost Narrative,” above, which takes us to the “World’s End.” The paintings’ subjects often gaze back at the viewer, further shackling passers-by into lingering.

by CaroPosted on

As we are living in a digital age, it’s safe to say that typewriters are an artifact of the past. But for Rachel Mulder, an artist living in Portland, Oregon, the classic typing machine still proves to be an important creative tool. With a meticulous eye, and even more patience, Mulder uses her typewriter as a way to “draw” from old photographs, keystroke by keystroke. “There is something so special in the error of the human hand,” she says, “-that I enjoy while conversely and fretfully attempting to attain perfection.”

by Andy SmithPosted on

John Kenn Mortensen is a Denmark native who spends his days directing and writing children’s television shows. But during those off-hours, Mortensen finds a piece of office stationery and creates an entirely new, twisted world populated by towering monsters and fantastic creatures. Mortensen has released a couple books of post-it note scenes and other illustrations, with a dedicated Internet following that delights in his darkness.

by CaroPosted on

Brooklyn, New York based artist Dan Witz, featured here, has been producing activist street art around the world since the seventies. His provocative interventions feature images that trick the eye and often, the majority of people don’t notice them right away. He plans to take his art to London next with his latest project, “Breathing Room”, an ambitious undertaking where he will install his signature-illusionistic paintings in the city’s iconic red phone booths.

by CaroPosted on

Japanese artist Motoi Yamamoto’s incredible installations made out of salt are entrancing to look at with their repetitive and meticulous patterns. Yamaoto has expressed that, in viewing his zen-like designs, he hopes others may find some point in their meditation for a healing or resolution of thought. His pure white crystalline works have been installed all over the world, most recently at the French castle of Aigues-Mortes.