by Andy SmithPosted on

In Erika Sanada’s “Cover My Eyes,” running through July 30 at Modern Eden Gallery in San Francisco, viewers find a new batch of ceramic sculptures from the Japanese artist. Sanada’s “dogs” typically feature at least one physical mutation and represent ongoing anxieties in the artist’s life. She explains the addition of new animals this time around: “The rats and birds present with the dogs are further extensions of myself and my fears. Birds, like my anxieties, are difficult to contain and control, and are always a part of me and my work.” The artist was featured in Hi-Fructose Vol. 31.

by Margot BuermannPosted on

Amy Casey is known for her paintings of miniature towns with teeny suburban houses and buildings, many of which are modeled after the ones she comes across in her adopted hometown of Cleveland. Rendered in incredible detail, her tiny structures are stacked like building blocks and teeter on stilts at anxiety-inducing heights. Connecting these delicate communities are maddening networks of highways and cables, and while people are visibly absent from the picture, there is no doubt that these microcosms are brimming with life and nervous energy. We featured her work in Hi-Fructose Vol. 5 and on the blog here and here.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Georgia Hill, an artist and illustrator, creates hand-drawn, type-based murals across Australia. Hill employs monochromatic textures and backdrops for grand-scale results. Both Hill’s canvases and ideas run big, with themes revolving around time and a sense of longing. Check out the artist’s Instagram account here.

by Andy SmithPosted on


Shang Chengxiang, born in Shenyang, China, creates bold paintings in which pops of brilliant colors are mixed with surreal imagery. There’s a sense of wonder in the artist’s works, often privately observed or existing outside of human interaction altogether. The artist is part of the group show “FIREFLOWERS” at Art Labor Gallery in Shanghai, running July 2-Aug. 16.

by Margot BuermannPosted on


Midwestern artist Zoe Hawk explores the social constructions of femininity through her portrayals of adolescent girls on the verge of womanhood. Her narrative works resemble illustrations one might find in a children’s book, with her subjects playing the parts of sweet-natured schoolgirls, candy stripers, and girl scouts. Yet, as we begin to look beneath the surface, it becomes clear that things are not always as they appear.

by Andy SmithPosted on


To step inside a creation by The Very Many is to briefly cross over into an alien world. The New York City-based studio, led by French artist-architect Marc Fornes, makes installations and environments that can feel both functional and purely aesthetic. The studio says its specialization is “computational design and digital fabrication,” though the results can feel organic in nature. Fornes was last featured on HiFructose.com here.