by Andy SmithPosted on


Philadelphia-based artist Jesse Krimes spent six years in prison, and in that time, he secretly produced a prolific amount of original art. That body of work includes a 39-panel mural made out of bed sheets stitched together, titled “Apokaluptein:16389067.” As explained in an artist statement: “The title references the Greek origin of the word apocalypse meaning to ‘uncover, reveal;’ an event involving destruction or damage on a catastrophic scale; the numbers reference Krimes’ Federal Bureau of Prisons identification number.”

by Margot BuermannPosted on


Japanese artist Erina Matsui has earned much attention for her hallucinatory portraits that feature the artist herself as the focal subject. Her distinct style is founded on her tendency to enlarge and distort her features, whether stretching them across her canvas or placing them in the midst of surreal transformation.

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beinArt Gallery presents Small Works 2016. This group exhibition features over 55 of the most highly skilled and imaginative artists in the new contemporary art movement. With all works under 10” x 10” (25.4 x 25.4cm) this greatly anticipated exhibition will offer collectors a rare opportunity to acquire affordable art from a host of internationally celebrated artists. Opens Saturday, September 17, 6pm – 9pm. Runs until October 9. See complete online preview.

by Margot BuermannPosted on


Australian artist Amanda Parer has her sights set on a global invasion with her dramatic, illuminated sculptures. Her oversized, inflatable creations have been exhibited across the world at a variety of festivals, museums and public spaces. On her website, the artist shares that her work aims to “explore the natural world, its fragility, and our role within it.”

by Andy SmithPosted on


“Subway Doodle” is the name Ben Rubin uses when posting drawings he makes on his commute to and from work each day. The artist snaps a photo and using his iPad, he inserts monsters, animals, and occasionally horrifying scenes into everyday life. Sometimes, the fictional creatures soak in the banality of the subway with fellow passengers. Other times, unsuspecting passengers are unaware of the terror that sits next to them.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Luis Garcia, who uses the moniker OOGLIOO, is a San Diego-based artist who crafts psychedelic and surreal worlds with a mix of acrylics and colored pencils. As the viewer’s eyes descend down the page, surprises await as the entire essence of otherworldly beings come into focus.