by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

The interconnectedness of the Earth’s living creatures plays a major role in Allison Green’s new paintings, which she will show in her solo exhibition “Teeming,” opening at Susan Eley Fine Art in New York on April 2. Raised in rural Pennsylvania and currently based in Jersey City, NJ, Green grew up with a forest in her backyard and was a close observer of the flora and fauna that surrounded her from a young age. In “Teeming,” yarn-like balls of ivy, vines, and flowers act is microcosms that encapsulate mini-ecosystems. Green invites the viewer to look closely to observe the many birds, butterflies, and other insects hidden in their midst. Her deep appreciation for nature’s splendor comes across in her bright, fun pieces.

by CaroPosted on

Revok is set to make his LA debut on April 10th at MAMA gallery space with his exhibition aptly titled “Revok: Los Angeles”. His show already promises the vibrant, geometric forms that Revok has become known for, recently featured in the publication “Revok: Made in Detroit.” On display will be 12 new paintings on assembled wood pieces, a sort of continuation of that series. Here, Revok explores new themes inspired by his newfound home in Los Angeles where he sources his materials.

by CaroPosted on

For their first show of 2015, Marcas Contemporary Art features twenty artists whose works evoke a sense of misdirection and uncertainty. As the title suggests, they portray themes of longing, confusion, and instability through both subdued and vibrant pieces, spanning a variety of media. Those featured here include Jaclyn Alderete, Gabe Larson, Ken Garduno, Gosia Casey Gray, N.C. Winders, Gomez Bueno, and Amliv Sotomayer, exhibiting works characteristic of their signature styles.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Christian Edler’s self-portraits hint at an inner conflict brewing within the artist’s psyche. Edler uses his own likeness for surrealist visual experiments, painting himself with various mutations that explore the battles we have with ourselves. In one work, Edler’s face multiplies over and over, creating a web of mouths, fingers, and eye sockets that seems bent on destroying itself. In another piece, he collapses face down in resignation, his face cracking like a ceramic vase. Other works are more hopeful, however, like the one where he cuts himself loose from puppet strings and heads towards a new destiny.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Mundane elements of city life like cars, bicycles, and architecture become sites for imaginative play in Gerry Judah’s sculptural work, which often combines the otherworldly and the utilitarian. From his various flying car installations to his recent “Bengal” series, in which models of religious temples precariously balance on top of bicycles, Judah initially captivates viewers with spectacle. But the attention-grabbing visual components are what lead one to explore the more serious themes that Judah broaches.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Vladimir Kraynyk’s work takes inspiration from art history and cutting-edge technology alike. His oil paintings of voluminous abstract forms reference the decorative arts of the Baroque period as well as contemporary 3D-rendered images. These disparate aesthetics combine to form geometric shapes that appear to be in constant motion. Forms come together and break apart like a colorful Big Bang repeating over and over again. Kraynyk has a background in graffiti, which comes through in the way his abstract shapes evoke calligraphy. Take a look at his work below.