by CaroPosted on

Today, we live in a universe where astronauts can tweet us their selfies from orbit. It’s hard to believe that not long ago, artists and scientists alike had to use their imagination to envision the starry yonder. Indianapolis artist Mab Graves has often looked to the glorious space illustrations of the 1930s to 1970s for the inspiration of her fantastical dreamland, an ever-expanding universe populated by big-eyed waifs and their animal friends. Featured here on our blog, her sweet and carefree characters have developed a wild streak, where in recent works, they daringly venture into the splendid and infinite cosmos. Graves’ upcoming solo at Arch Enemy Arts in Philadelphia furthers her character’s love for adventure in imaginative new images that blend science and fiction.

by CaroPosted on

The crucifixion of Jesus has been depicted in religious art since the 4th century CE. World renown Scottish-born artist David Mach, famous for his stunning sculptures made out of wire coat hangers, turned heads with his own depiction of the Bible’s most compelling event- his “Golgotha” sculpture first debuted in his 2011 exhibition titled “Previous Light”, which opened in commemoration of the 400th anniversary of the King James Bible. The monumental piece is again provoking a strong reaction with its recent display within the 14th century walls of Chester Cathedral in England.

by CaroPosted on

When French designer Emmanuelle Moureaux first arrived in Tokyo, she became fully fascinated by the colors overflowing on the street. She found that the city’s overwhelming number of store signs, flying electrical cables, and flashes of blue sky framed by various volumes of buildings created three dimensional “layers”. The flood of various colors that pervade the city streets are mirrored in her design installations, which build up a complex depth and intensity of space. These experiences of colors and layers are in the inspiration of Moureaux’s latest project, “bunshi” (meaning “ramification”), which means to divide or spread out into branches- a rainbow-colored suspended forest made on 20,000 pieces of paper shaped like twigs in 100 shades of color.

by CaroPosted on

Dreams are considered important, real, and public in some cultures, but absurd, irrational and personal in others. Japan has its own history of dreaming, and the importance of dreams has evolved through Japanese supernatural beliefs and art for centuries. “Dreams are like strange stories,” says Tokyo based artist Atsuko Goto, who builds on her own visions of dreams in her other-worldly mixed media drawings. “I draw what comes up from our unconscious, like hidden feelings reflected in our dreams.”

by CaroPosted on

In his ongoing project “Cement Eclipses”, Issac Cordal takes an unconventional approach to observing our behavior as a social mass. His alluring and surprising miniature cement figures placed in public locations, featured in our new issue and here on our blog over the years, reveal scenes that zoom in the routine tasks of the contemporary human being. The Spanish artist describes his work as “quickly opening doors to other worlds”, often where the “unwelcome” or unfortunate are welcoming the viewer to consider the issues that face the real world.

by CaroPosted on

When we think of beauty in nature, we immediately think of things that dazzle the senses- the prominence of a mountain, the expanse of the sea, the unfolding of the life of a flower. For Polish artist Aneta Regel, there is also a beauty in nature’s unpredictability: it’s ability to “sculpt” rock formations from weathering and erosion, or the dense arrangements of moss on a tree branch. The London based ceramist challenges our perceptions with her work and makes us interested in these overlooked transformations.