by CaroPosted on

The paper dress captured the vibrant and consumerist zeitgeist of 1960s America so precisely that the fashion press speculated about paper garments taking over the market. But as the novelty appeal of paper clothes wore off, their downsides became more apparent and they very soon ended up as waste. Los Angeles based Venezuelan photographer Cristobal Valecillos’ series “A Cardboard Life” elevates paper back to a high fashion level, but his work’s allure comes with an urgent message. All of his images are made out of recyclable materials from the clothes on his models to their environments, styled after the splendor of Pre-Raphaelite painting and making us look at trash with new eyes.

by CaroPosted on

Chewing gum has a history that spans as far back as the ancient Greeks- that’s how long it’s been finding its way to the bottoms of our shoes, underneath tables, and just about anywhere else it can stick to. It’s not a pretty sight. However, New Jersey based photographer and print maker Michael Massaia saw something oddly compelling in the shapes of chewed gum and decided to make it the unlikely subject of his latest series.

by CaroPosted on

Obesity is gaining legitimacy as a health epidemic, especially in America, the birthplace of the fast food chain. But it’s not a new issue for Pop Surrealist painter Ron English. First featured in Hi-Fructose Vol. 12, his colorful anti-corporate and cartoon-inspired works have long addressed his interests in all things mass-produced, including food and our increasing tendency to over eat.

by CaroPosted on

First featured in Hi-Fructose Vol. 12, and soon our “Turn The Page: The First Ten Tears of Hi-Fructose” retrospective at Virginia MOCA, Scott Hove is an unforgettable name for his decadent, yet nightmarish “Cakeland” series that includes snarling ‘taxidermied’ cakes and elaborate installations. But his works are more than just a sweet experience. Hove’s use of dualistic imagery in the cakes’ fangs, horns and switchblades are there to add psychological depth and force the viewer to choose how to integrate the dark elements into the lightness of the cake. For years, the Los Angeles based artist’s primary goal has been to make the experience as “satisfying” as possible, which makes his latest project all the more savory.

by CaroPosted on

What does it mean to be “normal”? Normality is different to different people, generally applying to what is considered acceptable and not out of the ordinary. To Los Angeles based artist Wyatt Mills, the idea of being “normal” has a broad meaning that he addresses in his latest series of chaotic mixed media paintings. Mills is an artist that likes to make observations about the human psyche, relating his work to a reflection of his reality which is never one thing and switches between different styles.

by CaroPosted on

Combining his own creativity and digital techniques, Dutch artist Bert Simons makes incredibly lifelike sculptures of the people around him out of paper. His paper portraits share an uncanny resemblance, and as the technology has improved over the years, so has the quality of the Rotterdam-based artist’s works. Each portrait first begins with outlining his subject in little black dots (a “dot per dot” reference method) that are then scanned into the open source cad program Bender to create a “map” of the face, to which he applies color and texture. Simons then prints a flat rendering that is like a little work of art in its own right, a mask that he painstakingly cuts and glues back together again into the pieces you see here.