by Clara MoraesPosted on

French street artist Arthur-Louis Ignoré, aka ALI, has found a unique way to embellish his surroundings. Using resilient materials that can last for a few months, he paints mandalas and ornaments on walls, streets, sidewalks, buildings and just about anywhere else he can reach. ALI is not interested in making sketches, and prefers to let his subconscious take over during the creative process. To him, randomness is key. The end result is a spontaneous and meticulous body of work that explores pattern making through ornamentation.

by CaroPosted on

There was a resurgence of interest in UFOs and extraterrestrials in the 1970s after Swiss author Erich Von Daniken wrote “Chariots of The Gods.” Travis Louie (HF Vol. 32 cover artist) grew up in that environment, and once thought of aliens as the ultimate immigrants. For his new body of work, “Watch the Skies”, which debuts tonight at KP Projects/MKG in Los Angeles, Louie incorporates aliens into his cast of creature portraits. His monochromatic acrylic paintings have been likened to bizarre snapshots of monsters, to the effect of old-timey photographs from the Victorian and Edwardian periods. Though Louie has a longtime fascination with atomic-age science fiction, his aliens represent more than just a fantasy.

by CaroPosted on

Barcelona based multi-disciplinary artist Suso33 is constantly seeking different ways to express himself. His explorations have taken him from beginnings in the graffiti scene, to painting and performing arts, and he has become one of Spain’s most established live-painters. When he paints murals, he doesn’t think in terms of labels, whether it be “street art” or “graffiti”. To him, what’s most important is the communication of an idea, and his come in many forms and visual styles. His most recent mural in Bilbao, Spain borders on the surreal and supernatural.

by CaroPosted on

Japanese born, San Francisco based artist Junko Mizuno (featured on the cover of HF Vol. 23) has a penchant for sweetly demonic characters. Her colorful paintings, drawings and graphic novels feature witch-like goddesses, sexy over-eating vixens, and fairytale-inspired girls with badass magical powers. Among them all, Junko Mizuno has her three favorites: a witch, a nurse, and a wrestler. The trio makes up the starring characters in her latest exhibition “TRIAD”, opening tonight at Cotton Candy Machine Gallery in Brooklyn, which is closing its doors at the end of this year.

by CaroPosted on

Mexican street artist and illustrator “Smithe” creates intensely detailed images that combine biological and mechanical motifs. Featured here on our blog, Smithe’s art is a visual collage of everything that he loves; a mix of comics, animation, film, street art, science fiction, but mostly spontaneity and fun. Like his murals, his illustrations portray strange figures and pop-culture characters in a state of deconstruction. They stretch, distort, and melt into the floor, other times falling into a thousand little particles of themselves. Smithe explores the source of such madness in his latest body of work, “Fisuras de la Materia” (“Fissures of Matter”), currently on view at Celaya Brothers Gallery in Mexico.

by CaroPosted on

Street artist and painter Franco Fasoli, aka JAZ, began his career in the late ’90s, and has always been experimenting with new materials and media. He is primarily known for his large scale murals, featured here on our blog, which led him to finding new opportunities all over the world. JAZ credits his travels for his style of work, which is like a fusion of visual aesthetics and cultures. “My inspiration comes from Latin American cultures, and chaotic history, with images that overlap or confront different cultures,” he says. His latest exhibition, “REMAINS”, which opened last night at Elsi del Rio in Argentina, is a culmination of all of his recent experiences that inspire him for different reasons.