by CaroPosted on

Though the clay works of Ronit Baranga, featured here on our blog, have been described as chill-inducing, frightening, and even repulsive, the Israeli artist doesn’t see her work this way. Her sculptures animate every day objects such as dishes, tea cups, and saucers, offering them the ability to express the full spectrum of human emotions. Even her humanoid figures sprout new body parts as if their skin has a mind of its own.

by CaroPosted on

Amsterdam based artist Daan Noppen brings a special dynamism to his pencil drawings of still life and portraits. His works are not only eye-catching for their precise layering of details, but also in their massive size that gives his subjects a more palpable presence. A closer look at each piece reveals mathematical equations in between the pencil lines that relate to our reality. More recent works express the artist’s continued fascination with mathematics, geometry, and physics, as his figures appear to be gauged, dissipate, and intermingle in a void of empty vector space.

by CaroPosted on

London based sculptor Rachel Kneebone is well known for her complex porcelain pieces that contain writhing groupings of human figures. Her work has been described as depicting an “erotic state of flux” and “celebrating forms of transgression, beauty and seduction,” influenced by ancient Greek and Roman myths and also the modern human experience- you can find aspects of change, death, growth, renewal, and lust dissolved together in her individual pieces.

by Abby Lynn KlinkenbergPosted on

Collage artist Maja Egli creates surreal portraits by manipulating various images of women to work together as complex unities. Her work can be read both as a feminist statement and as a larger comment on humanity: on one level, she suggests that women are complex beings (a quality that is often denied to them in much of mainstream art), while on the other, Egli’s collages imply that we as human beings are composed of disparate and assorted influences. Most of her figures are incomplete, lacking some fullness of form; the few full figures that we do get are faceless.

by Somayra IsmailjeePosted on

Los Angeles based artist Jesse Mockrin (featured here) will debut a new body of work at her upcoming show opening on Saturday at Night Gallery. “The Progress of Love” is her second solo show, following “Midnight Sun” in 2014 with a series of oil paintings that revisit the French Rococo era. Mockrin reimagines source material such as Louise Élisabeth Vigée Le Brun’s “Portrait of Madame du Barry” to construct an ethereal world of transgression, luminescence and beauty. The fluid curvature of limbs and fingers, softness of facial features, and emphasis on portions of each scene by isolating them into standalone pieces themselves, are all characteristic of her work.

by CaroPosted on

Czech artist Jan Uldrych questions reality in his fleshy and atmospheric paintings. Though the artist hesitates to provide any specific meaning for his work, we can find some clues in his titles; paintings like “Anatomy of memories” and “Mild decomposition landscapes” point to Uldrych’s interests in the visceral and anatomical, which he abstracts into Rorschach test-like images.