by CaroPosted on

There is an infinite number of ways that Lego toys can be arranged. Artists have taken the popular Danish toy to surprising places, pushing it beyond the boundary of what “toys” are, as we’ve seen here on our blog. But one artist Jan Vormann based in Berlin, Germany has taken Lego to the streets. Some have called it “Lego bombing”, but Vormann prefers to describe his work as “patchwork”, a project that he is bringing around the world.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Separately, each artificial nail used by South African artist Frances Goodman is a temporary, expendable object. But when the artist combines them into a single sculpture, she depicts living, “bodily forms” that defy their nature. “Some of the sculptures are abstract and consider ideas of oozing, spreading, and writhing,” the artist says, in a statement. “Others suggest snakes and scaled creatures.”

by Andy SmithPosted on

Los Angeles artist Jedediah Corwyn Voltz does painting, printmaking, and woodcutting, but it’s his experience as a TV and film propmaker that’s most apparent in “Something Small,” his upcoming show at Virgil Normal. Each of these miniature treehouses are customized to the succulents, cacti, and bonsai trees they inhabit. And as you’re welcomed inside each homestead, the intricacy of Voltz’s vision comes into focus.

by CaroPosted on

Prune Nourry is a French, New York based multi-disciplinary artist who draws her inspiration from bioethics. Through her performances, artworks, and exhibition design, Nourry brings attention to issues that arise from our fast growing scientific discoveries. Her latest work, titled “Anima”, is an immersive installation that explores the concept of soul and “the divide between Man and Animal”, a collaboration between art, magic, and anthropology.

by Andy SmithPosted on

The words “spontaneity” and “fluidity” have informed the processes of countless artists. But there’s something else in the art of Ian Cheng, whose video simulations garner lives of their own. His virtual worlds are designed to self-evolve. Characters morph or go off-map. Showings can be engrossing and quick-moving, or they can be like one session of “Emissary in the Squat of Gods” last year, when a virtual girl simply stared at piece of volcanic ash for a couple hours, as viewers looked on.

by Margot BuermannPosted on

On Thursday, the David Zwirner Gallery in London debuted new drawings by cartoonist R. Crumb for the third installment of his Art & Beauty magazine. Art & Beauty was first published in 1996 and inspired by an early 20th century publication of the same name, which produced semi-erotic images of life models for art lovers and aspiring artists. Following in this tradition, but with his own sense of humor and iconic style, Crumb has created portraits of modern day women based on photographs of celebrities, close friends, and even complete strangers.