by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Augustine Kofie began his career as a graffiti writer over two decades ago, but his desire to master the art of the spray can lead him to develop the abstract style and vintage-inspired color palette for which he is known. Kofie is currently working on a mural for the ongoing street art festival Pow Wow Hawaii in Honolulu. Hi-Fructose got a chance to go up on the lift with him to chat while he painted. Kofie showed us his initial sketch (something he rarely reveals), which he renders in a combination of traditional and digital media. Read more after the jump.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Sarah Folkman’s new series of paintings developed in parallel to the artist’s journey through love and the complicated feelings that inevitably arise in the process of finding a mate. The delicately-painted works on wooden surfaces will debut on February 15 in Folkman’s solo show at CHG Circa in Culver City, “The Burden of Adoration.” The body of work focuses on a maddening, unrestrained type of love: The kind of intense emotion that prompts people to do anything to protect their partners from harm but ignites a desire to annihilate them if they transgress the boundaries of the relationship. Read more after the jump.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

The annual street art festival Pow Wow Hawaii kicked off this past Monday in Honolulu. Dozens of well-known street artists from all over the world are currently gathered in the Kaka’ako neighborhood for a week of mural painting — from renowned figures like Ron English, Andrew Schoultz and Augustine Kofie to noteworthy emerging artists like Seth Globepainter, Inti, Know Hope and more. Most of the murals are currently in their early phases, but Buff Monster and Nychos evidently are very speedy with the spray paint. The duo, who have collaborated previously, have been working with a harmony that’s fascinating to observe, and somewhat surprising, considering their disparate styles. Read more after the jump.

by Roxanne GoldbergPosted on

Drawing inspiration from the natural sciences, Dutch still lifes and human curiosity about both beauty and death, Jennifer Trask creates installations using such found materials as bones, antique frames and gems. Her materials and subject matter make clear art historical references to the Dutch Golden Age tradition of Vanitas, which often juxtaposed skulls with objects from nature to comment on man’s vacuous material existence. However, instead of placing oppositional forces next to one another, Trask collapses them in a symphony of natural and man-made elements.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Maya Hayuk recently created a new mural on the Bowery and Houston wall in Manhattan (the same wall that previously housed murals by Pose, Revok, Swoon and a plethora of other notable street artists). Hayuk’s grid-like works are fundamentally geometric, but despite their architectural style, they are largely created in the spur of the moment, with little advance planning. “It’s all made up as I go and it feels GREAT,” wrote the artist in an email to Hi-Fructose. “It’s my favorite way of working. It’s very physical and freeing.” She begins by roughly sketching a few evenly-spaced lines, but allows herself to get carried away in the process from there. During the course of this work’s completion, the artist labored in the snow and sleet of the cold New York winter, ultimately emerging with a triumphant, colorful piece that adds color to the city’s landscape.