by CaroPosted on

Esao Andrews (HF Vol. 22), João Ruas (HF Vol. 23), and Aaron Horkey are three artists who each share a penchant for stylization and design. Feeling inspired, Aaron Horkey suggested they get together for a new exhibition at Thinkspace Gallery titled “The Gilded Age”. The real Gilded Age took place during late 19th century America, coined by writer Mark Twain, who satirized the era as serious social problems masked by a thin gold gilding. Their exhibit embodies the concept of gilding in the artists’ unique combination of illustration and graphic design.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Andrew B. Myers’s photographs have a sense of order that makes them strangely satisfying to look at. In his studio, Myers arranges mundane objects on bright backgrounds, creating repeating, grid-like patterns. We see the items for their formal qualities, not their individual significance. Toys, electronics, sumptuous fruits, and sugary deserts become colorful specks whose shapes and colors matter more than their functionality. While some of Myers’s works look almost too neat to be real — like they could be digital illustrations instead of photos of actual objects — in certain pieces, he strategically reveals elements of his process. A leg of his tripod or duct tape Xs on the floor make their way into some photos, revealing the human touch behind these immaculate arrangements.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

We recently reviewed Andrew Schoultz’s solo show at Hosfelt Gallery in San Francisco, “Blown to Bits,” where he reflected on the chaos of world events through an apocalyptic lens. This past week, Empire Seven Studios commissioned Schoultz to do a mural in San Jose, CA that touches upon some of the same themes. Schoultz is an artist with his personal arsenal of symbolic motifs. In viewing his work across various media — from street art to installations to paintings — cohesive ideas begin to emerge through the recurring imagery. Schoultz juxtaposes symbols of wealth and grandeur — like Grecian vases, tigers, gold coins, and ships — with chaotic line work that resembles explosions. His work signals at a civilization in decline, mired by its own greed and hubris.

by CaroPosted on

Four distinct artists- Andrew Brandou, The London Police, Redd Walitzki, and Richard J. Oliver– will show alongside each other next Saturday at CHG Circa. Simply titled “FOUR”, their collective show ranges in a variety of styles and themes that portray ethereal environments. Notably, this exhibit is Redd Walitzki’s (covered here) Los Angeles debut of her enchanting laser cut paintings. Check out our preview after the jump!

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Andrew Schoultz ruminates on the decline of Western civilization and the impulse to conquer in his current solo show at San Francisco’s Hosfelt Gallery, “Blown to Bits.” The exhibition features several site-specific installations as well as new paintings and works on paper.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Miami-based artist Andrew Soria’s color-saturated landscapes might appear completely fictitious, but he creates his digital artworks using his original photography and a heavy dose of PhotoShop. Soria stitches together and flattens the cityscapes he shoots, making them appear cartoonish by accentuating each building’s unique shape and features. He often pays homage to the street art and decor of the local area. Some of his pieces feature murals by artists such as Chor Boogie and Shepard Fairey while others incorporate businesses’ signage. Devoid of human inhabitants, Soria’s cities appear otherworldly with their all-too-pristine contours and candy-colored skies.