by CaroPosted on

Throughout human history, stories about wild and elusive giants have been told on almost every continent. Iceland-based French multimedia artist Philip Ob Rey has reimagined such monsters in a photo series of sculptures made of VHS tapes. Rey created “V” HS Project, a set of 5 series of black and white photos and accompanying short films, in contemplation of the future of the human race. Set against the gray skies of Iceland’s landscape, the photos portray nightmarish figures wandering a cold and post apocalyptic world.

by CaroPosted on

Japanese artist Hirabayashi Takahiro (not to be confused with Takahiro Hirabayashi) infuses his religion’s mythology with the experience of growing up in his oil paintings. Using “boundaries” as a central theme, his dreamy portraits examine borders between the sky, land and sea, man and nature, childhood and adulthood, and how we navigate them. His main subjects are young girls who serve as a guide or guardian for those in this inbetween state of being. Considering their young age, they share in this delicate state.

by CaroPosted on

Last year, Portland based artist Peter Gronquist made a remarkable departure from his dramatic taxidermy sculptures in favor of more abstract explorations. He continues to experiment with color and form in his latest body of work for “All of the Above”, opening on Saturday at Soze Gallery in Los Angeles. The show expands on his 2014 exhibition “The Great Escape” which featured infinity boxes of holographic war planes and firearms, a recurring motif in Gronquist’s art.

by CaroPosted on

Brooklyn based artist Ray Bartkus has toyed with the idea of reflections in his paintings, drawings and street art work, but not quite like this. When he was invited to paint a building along Šešupė River in Marijampole, Lithuania, the idea to paint it upside down was undeniable. “I never did anything with the reflection in the river before, but since the building was next to it, it was kind of an obvious thing to consider,” he says.

by CaroPosted on

Denmark based artist Rune Christensen tells stories in the tattoos and printed clothing of his decorated figures. As a self taught painter with a graffiti background, Christensen is well traveled and has collected his visual inspiration from all over the world. He sources his motifs from the iconography and textiles of cultures including Asian, South American, North African and Native American. Christensen’s portraits of women, men and children are simple in composition and palette, yet complex is the depiction of their symbolism which has layered meaning.

by CaroPosted on

The vivid watercolor paintings and drawings of Henk Pander reflect on a lifetime of experiences – memories of Nazi-occupied Europe, the Vietnam war, and 1960s counterculture all make their way into his dramatic imagery set against the backdrop of Oregon. Pander first moved to Portland from the Netherlands in the 1960s, and continued to work as a stage set designer through the 70s and 80s, owing to his theatrical style. There is a surrealism in his realism. That is to say, his works capture the nightmare of real life disasters, death, disease and pollution. With the technique of European masters like Holbein and Dutch landscape painters, many images find the quiet moments before and after death, in spite of their horrifying circumstances.