by Andy SmithPosted on

From bronze to blown glass, stainless steel to gems, the otherworldly sculptural works of Tian He have deep roots in the earth. The artist, based in Beijing, uses childlike imagery with intricate details that tell contained narratives of strange children and fanciful figures. Her pieces were recently featured in the show “Small is Beautiful VII” at Leo Gallery in Shanghai.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Italian artist Lorenzo Quinn unveiled a new sculpture at Ca’ Sagredo Hotel during this year’s Venice Biennale. “Support,” an enormous sculptural installation that appears to emerge out of the Grand Canal, appears as enormous, white hands. The work aims to display how humans have the ability and opportunity to “change and re-balance the world around them.” In particular, the hands are commenting on the urgency of climate change.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Evan Hobart, a California-based ceramics artist, creates beastly mixed-media creatures that offer commentary on both urban and social issues. Living in large urban areas inspires the artist to explore consumerism, global climate change, pollution, and “eventual extinction” in his sculptures. Hobart crafts cityscapes on and inside ceramic fossil heads, absorbing at different distances. In the works, “the imbalance between the innocents of the natural world and the chaotic blind dominance of humanity” is on display.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Amin Sadeghy, an artist and architect living in London, crafts personal work that implements architectural figures at varying scales and elaborate sets and configurations. The works seem to use the human bodies as both faceless design elements and reflections on the power of crowds. At close range and from afar, these intricate structures create different conversations.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Cayetano Ferrández, a Spanish artist/photographer, uses his “Gray Man” action figures and micro-narratives to explore varying, often bleak aspects of humanity. His work, a combination of photography, sculpture, and other mixed-media, has integrated toys since the early 2000s, with the “Gray Man” series being an ongoing project.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Italian artist Agostino Arrivabene paints otherworldly scenes that move between the romantic and the terrifying. His paintings, often oil on wood, both reference and emulate age-old concepts of transformation, death, and bonds between subjects and concepts of alchemy. At times, the works rely on familiar symbology; in other works, the image appears as something wholly novel. The artist was last featured on HiFructose.com here.