by CaroPosted on

Fans of Japanese contemporary artist Yayoi Kusama need no introduction to the Kusama pumpkin- her dotted signature motif and yes, alter ego. Her pumpkins have been famously recreated from hotel rooms to textiles and designer hand bags by Louis Vuitton. She’s even taken us inside of their surreal, organic structure, as in her Selfridges London pop-up store this time last year. So the story goes, Kusama’s family once owned a storehouse full of pumpkins during World War II, and she developed a fondness for them. Ever since, she has continually used them throughout her career as a symbol of growth and fertility. Just in time for Halloween, Victoria Miro in London is showing a new body of bronze sculptures and paintings 2 years in the making, simply titled “Pumpkins”.

by CaroPosted on

For nearly a decade, Copro Gallery has fused emerging talents with established names in the New contemporary art game in their annual “BLAB!” show. The show is the brainchild of Blab World creator and art director, Monte Beauchamp, representative of his eclectic taste in artists of varying aesthetics and a penchant for the unusual. Many of them have appeared in most, if not all, of the annual shows and developed together with the event. Last Saturday, “BLAB!” celebrated it’s ninth year as an exhibition with the announcement of the upcoming BLAB World 3 anthology.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

A large, abandoned Victorian hospital in the heart of Sao Paulo, Cidade Matarazzo became an artists’ playground for the project “Made by Brazilians.” Kenny Scharf, Arne Quinze, Joana Vasconcelos, Charley Case, Saner and others transformed the building with immersive installations in the weeks leading up to the Sao Paulo Biennial. Before plans to remodel the estate are put into effect, viewers are welcome to visit the space through October 11.

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Martin Wittfooth. The Aviary, 2013.

Long Beach Museum of Art presents “Masterworks: Defining A New Narrative” (October 23, 2014 – February 1, 2015) curated by Nathan Spoor and co-curator Jeff McMillan. This is a unique exhibition of 14 large-scale paintings featuring accomplished artists who, for the last decade, have been exploring new narrative directions in painting. Each of the artists have been charged with providing a singular work that could be considered pivotal in their careers. Artists will include Esao Andrews, James Jean, Martin Wittfooth and more.

by Victoria Casal-DataPosted on

English artist Chris Wood creates glass wall-panels that showcase maze-like structures that give the illusion of depth and brilliance through the glass’ interaction with natural and artificial light sources. The artist’s usage of small, reflective, dichroic (meaning “two color”) pieces of glass lets her easily create complex patterns of light and shade; the colors and textures that derive from these structures change in accordance to the position of the viewer and the angle of the light source, making her work an ever-changing, almost magical and intriguing phenomenon.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Berlin-based artist Reka recently travelled to London for his current solo show “Trip the Light” at StolenSpace Gallery (see our preview here) and left a mural behind in the Shoreditch district. While the graceful movements of dancers’ bodies served as the inspiration for the paintings in Reka’s exhibition, the mural took on a more playful, illustrative look despite its shared Modernist aesthetic. Over a black background, Reka painted free-flowing, abstract forms. Some of them emerge as illustrations of specific objects — a fish head, a chess piece with an all-seeing eye — while others keep the viewer asking questions. Is that a spray can with the punk slogan ACAB? The whimsical piece is intended to keep us guessing.