by CaroPosted on

San Jose based comic book artist and “professional hater” Jonathan Wayshak draws energetic illustrations which were featured in Hi-Fructose Collected II. At his Facebook page, he writes “I draw pictures with a lot of lines and huge nipples”, but that’s a modest description of his rough and enthralling drawing style. Wayshak works with a variety of materials; brush ink, gouache, acrylic, pencil, watercolors, pens, on whatever else is handy – paper scraps and leftover cut down illustration boards or watercolor paper. Take a look inside Wayshak’s sketchbook after the jump.

by Roxanne GoldbergPosted on

Italian artist Agostino Arrivabene uses antique painting techniques to create a foundation from which metamorphic figures emerge in moments of creation. The time-consuming labor of grinding pigments and layering paints is evident in the complex, heavily textural works. New worlds hide beneath and within cracks and crinkles as human-like figures manifest above ground and often out of water.

by CaroPosted on

Philadelphia based artist Nosego paints colorful and emotive images of animals inspired by the idea that we are all connected to our surroundings. We recently featured his exhibition of multimedia paintings “Along Infinite River”, here on the blog, where Nosego portrays wild animals morphing into mystical environments. For his latest mural titled “Little Moment”, Nosego continues to infuse his work with celestial elements and bright colors, but he also wanted to do something a little “different”.

by CaroPosted on

Dallas, Texas based artist Michael Reeder paints eclectic portraits that explore ideas about identity. Reeder is fascinated by the various characteristics that define us, and his works mix those elements both stylistically and conceptually. While his main interest is modern identity, the figures he portrays often have a classical quality. He renders their faces as if he were chiseling away at marble, redefined with abstract and exaggerated features with blank eyes (ancient statue eyes were painted or inlaid.) His portraits aren’t meant to be accurate representations. Rather, he considers portraiture to be more like a reinvention of his subjects, which takes place at their simplest form. 

by CaroPosted on

Philadelphia based artist Crystal Wagner recently exhibited a colorful new installation at the National Museum of Singapore. “Wanderlust” is a site-specific piece that she created for the museum’s “Masak Masak 2015″ exhibition, a part of their ‘season of the children’ celebrations. Previously covered here on our blog, Wagner’s largescale works are attention grabbing for her choice of curious and unconventional materials including paper, chicken wire, and tablecloths. Measuring a massive 70 feet long, her new piece is made out of pliable materials such as crepe paper and wire, from which she shaped tunnels for children to play in and crawl through.

by Roxanne GoldbergPosted on

Alien meets House of Wax in Matthew J. Levin‘s melted, mutilated statuettes. The spine-chilling creatures have glistening skin stretching over elongated bones and folding over protruding ribs. Many objects appear organically self-actualized; as if the creatures emerged alone out of a solid substance. Though their appearances may be repulsive, Levin’s method of positioning his small-scaled creatures in dance-like movements imbues them with a sort of grace and unearthly beauty.