by Annie OwensPosted on

Jessica Joslin is the creatrix of a curious menagerie of hybird creatures, composed of a varied anatomy of bone, glass, leather and metal, meticulously assembled to look like real specimens. Her work recalls a sense of the Victorian era’s obsession with detail and death and yet retains a playfulness attributed to circus shows of trained animals performing gravity defying feats. Hi-Fructose was recently able to interview the artist, take a look at her intriguing responses after the jump.

by Andy SmithPosted on


Since 2012, Jillian Dickson has explored motherhood and nature’s flora and fauna with the series “Our Epidural Currency.” These drawings combine blooming flowers, female organs, and insects for a cohesive portrait of evolutionary strength. Yet, in each of these bold renderings, the point of entry is a complex beauty found in these self-contained ecosystems. The goal, she says in a statement, is to “examine the forgotten and neglected connection between the female tactile body and wild mother nature.”

by Andy SmithPosted on


Chilean artist Santiago Salvador Ascui’s vibrant creations consist of people, whether rendered as a greater pattern, bunched together in corporate intimacy, or a private moment between two subjects. Rarely are these stylized characters alone. Rather, the painter seems most focused on creating a sense of unity with much of this work.

by Andy SmithPosted on

The name “Albarrán Cabrera” is a moniker for the Spanish duo Anna Cabrera and Angel Albarran. The photographers have produced work together for the past two decades, showcasing across the world and tackling new challenges and techniques together under one name. And for each new theme, the duo finds away to show each’s singular vision within a broader idea.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Ahn Sun Mi, a South Korea-born artist, digitally manipulates her entire body to create self-portraits that somehow add more honesty and vulnerability, instead of covering up truth. Sun Mi’s work proves that there’s no end to our complexity, as she examines her own endless facets. Even when the work contains multiple versions of the same body part, the result is something new each time.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Life and death are major themes explored through the work of Claire Morgan, a U.K.-based artist who uses taxidermy and invisible wire to create objects that express both ideas. The result is a moment in time, one that conveys the beauty of the animal, its fragility, and our own strained relationship with nature. In a statement, Morgan says, “Through my work, I am looking at everyday life and death; and the ideas of entertainment, consumption, meaninglessness and loneliness are a part of that.”