by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Chicken wire and shredded dollar store table cloths are all Crystal Wagner sees over the multiple days it takes her to weave and sculpt one of her signature installations. Her work mimics organic shapes found in nature but betrays its artificiality with its fluorescent color schemes. Wagner recently debuted her latest installation, “Elasticity,” on view through February 6 at Bagwell Art Gallery at the Pellissippi State Community College campus in Knoxville, Tennessee. Made from the aforementioned materials, the colorful piece dominates the exhibition space and is one of Wagner’s most elaborate works to date.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Guest curated by photographer Henrik Haven and author Olly Walker, Urban Nation Berlin’s upcoming group show, “Cut It Out!”, explores the history and current state of stencil art. The exhibition opens on January 31 at Urban Nation’s headquarters and features well-known street artists such as Sten & Lex, Jeff Aerosol, Above, Aiko, C215, M-City, and many others.

by CaroPosted on

Lin Tianmiao is considered one of today’s most notorious contemporary artists in China, especially among women who are under-represented there in her field. Her signature medium is everyday materials, particularly woven textile such as silk, which she uses to convey modern women’s frustrations and identity. This has earned her the “feminist artist” label, one that she rejects. Male or female, her cryptic and ethereal works have captured the imagination for decades. Her “Focus” portrait photo series is currently on view in the “Conceal/Reveal: Making Meaning in Chinese Art” group showing at Seattle Asian Art Museum (SAM).

by Sasha BogojevPosted on

Argentinian artist Francisco Diaz (aka Pastel) uses a distinct visual language in his murals. He fills his walls with patterns based on the local flora of the area he’s painting in — an effective way to connect with the communities he encounters in his travels. His botanical references often address history, geography, society, and politics. Along with these nature-based elements, Pastel often paints ancient, Stone Age tools to glorify humanity’s strength without referencing a specific culture. His distinct yet decorative style lends itself well to collaborations with other street artists, such as Pixel Pancho and Agostino Iacurci, who both worked with Pastel recently.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Johnny Rodriguez (whom we first featured in HF Vol. 7) got the moniker KMNDZ from his graphic design profession. Pronounced “Command Z” — as in, the “undo” option on a Mac computer — the nickname alludes to both his trade and the themes in his personal artwork. Introspection, sorrow, and sometimes regret permeate his paintings. Rodriguez uses a network of self-created symbols to talk about his painful past experiences through surreal imagery. His solo show at Merry Karnowsky Gallery’s KP Projects in Los Angeles, “I’d Rather Love You,” opens on February 7. Take a look at our preview of his show below.

by CaroPosted on

Looking at the paintings of Korean artist Egene Koo is like piecing together a puzzle. Her dramatic red portraits of anthropomorphic characters are meant to be allegorical. Just as the tortoise and the hare taught us the rewards of patience and focus, there’s a mysterious moral to Koo’s images. From what we can gather from her titles, her work addresses lessons about change and sin, such as narcissism and greed. At LA Art Show, Koo’s gallery Keumsan also pointed to her themes of environmentalism and our relationship with wildlife, represented by the variety of animals she paints.