by CaroPosted on

Artist duo Gosha Levochkin and Devin Liston have made a name for themselves as DevNgosha, combining their backgrounds in illustration and fine art. Years after their first collaboration, Soze Gallery is showcasing their individual talents in side by side solos “GROWN UPS” and “LOST” (previewed here). As collaborators, they’ve come up with a system of working together and creating, where one starts a piece and the other finishes it, and vice versa. Now abandoning that system, we can see Liston and Gosha are artists who like to play with varying aesthetics.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Russian artist Yulia Brodskaya creates playful illustrations, installations and paper cut works using a unique method she developed after leaving her graphic design job in 2006. The artist rolls tiny strips of colorful paper into spirals that she aggregates into larger shapes, creating textural works that lie somewhere on the horizon between two and three dimensions. Her whimsical, springy work invites a sense of optimism. While paper cut art is typically a small-scale medium, Brodskaya often creates mural-sized artworks and installations for commercial clients, using paper to transform rigid spaces into fantastical realms.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Jenny Morgan’s (featured in HF Vol. 21) paintings reveal beauty in simplicity. She often depicts nude figures with poignant expressions, stylizing their bodies to fit her sunrise-hued palette in lieu of focusing on minuscule details like hairs and wrinkles. The simplification of her subjects gives her work a glossed-over effect that pushes it from objective realism into surreal territory. For her latest exhibition “The Golden Hour” at Plus Gallery in Denver, Morgan explored notions of spirituality and the cycle of life. While her major focus has always been faces, often using herself as a subject, her exhibition features a substantial amount of paintings of skulls, alluding to the fading nature of youth and the ephemerality of the body. Take a look at the work in the show below and check out “The Golden Hour” on view through October 18.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Based in Rotterdam, Netherlands, Anouk Griffioen creates haunting, mural-scale charcoal drawings that offer glimpses into lush, overgrown places where humanity and nature seamlessly connect. The human subjects of her work are merely guides for viewers to immerse themselves in the sublime landscapes. It’s as if Griffioen is inviting her viewers to imagine themselves as her often faceless characters. There is a fashion-conscious aspect to her work as well: the svelte, model-like bodies strike casual yet glamorous poses, wearing smartly tailored outfits that camouflage with their surroundings.

by CaroPosted on

Last Saturday, CHG Circa showed us every kind of giant you can think of with their group show “Giants Among Us” (previewed here). Giants are a timeless myth that has inspired artists for centuries. For Circa’s contemporary artists- Anita Kunz, Andrew Brandou, Armando Marino, Benjamin Bryce Kelley, Eric Joyner, Joe Fenton, John Brophy, Korin Faught, So Youn Lee, to name a few- giants are monstrous beasts, revered figures, a narrative and a concept. With so many literal and wildly conceptual ideas, it becomes a sort of game to find the giant in each.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

While he is currently barred from leaving China, renowned artist and activist Ai Weiwei has been working on “@Large: Ai Weiwei on Alcatraz” since his release from prison in 2011. Incarcerated for his politically outspoken artwork, Ai used his experience as fuel for a unique exhibition that fills the historical former prison and military fortress with site-specific installations that draw attention to human rights crises worldwide. Orchestrated remotely with the help of San Francisco-based curator Cheryl Haines and legions of volunteers, the exhibition is as much a spectacle as it is an educational experience.