by Andy SmithPosted on

Buenos Aires-born, Tokyo-based Nahuel Salcedo is a motion graphics designer known for his vibrant creations that absorb whether he’s animating the everyday or the abstract. His studio, Onesal, moves between commercial and creative projects, whether it’s Discovery Channel, Intel, or a music video for acts like Kaela.

by Andy SmithPosted on


Sometimes, massive leeches are simply just that: massive, gross, disconcerting leeches. Melbourne-based artist Beau White crafts oil paintings that may appall or at the very least, unsettle viewers. But he says that his love of “illustrating absurd, grotesque and distastefully humorous images” goes way back to his primary school days. But in general, there aren’t lofty statements to be made in these works.

by Andy SmithPosted on


Charles Birnbaum, a New York City-based artist, creates abstract ceramic pieces that seem both alien and influenced from the stranger part of nature. Whether it’s his wall sculptures or free-standing “vessels,” each pushes the form far beyond its classical uses. His work is held in collections and exhibited across the world.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Jeremy Geddes

The 44th volume of Hi-Fructose will be here in July 2017! Pre-order the issue here, or you can also subscribe to Hi-Fructose here.

Our next print issue, Hi-Fructose Vol. 44, features a a wrap-around cover with art by Jeremy Geddes. Featured in this issue are: The hyper-realistic natural anomalies of Lisa Ericson, the climactic monster paintings of Mu Pan, the mysterious drawings of Amandine Urruty, the paintings of Laura Berger, “Sick Girl”, the world of artist Mab Graves, Joey Colombo‘s currency cut-ups, comix artist Benjamin Constantine, the beautiful paintings of Vira Yakymchuck, Paolo Del Toro‘s enormous felted sculptures, Michael Reeder‘s murals and paintings, and a film review of Maurizio Cattelan: Be Right Back.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Gunjan Aylawadi‘s intricate paper-weaving technique produces vibrant, surprising creations. In each work made by the artist, born in India and now based in Australia, seems to defy its materials and exists “between craft traditions, sensory pleasures she experienced growing up and the new culture she finds herself in now.” In a recent show, she continues her evolution into work that extends beyond two dimensions.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Mark Dean Veca, one of the featured artists in “Turn the Page: The First Ten Years of Hi-Fructose,” created a new installation for the exhibition’s final stop at Crocker Art Museum in Sacramento. The absorbing, surreal “Maddest Hatter” greets visitors straight out of the elevator at the museum. In an Instagram video, the artist guides viewers through the completed installation.