by Andy SmithPosted on

In a new show at Corey Helford Gallery in Los Angeles, Natalia Fabia explores life cycles, from our stardust origins to death, and the natural portals that lead us to the divine. “Rainbeau Samsara,” which runs through Dec. 10 at the space, blends the conventions of oil painting and pops of sparkles and glitter to reflect the transcendental nature of the work’s content.

by Andy SmithPosted on

The context of the narratives depicted in Tom Herzberg’s paintings isn’t always clear for the viewer. Yet, the humorous and occasionally unsettling watercolor and acrylic works are absorbing and offer the chance to form our own theories about each’s wild characters. Herzberg is a Chicago-based artist and educator whose illustrations for magazines, books, newspapers, and other products number in the thousands.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Lyndal Osborne, a native of Australia now based in Canada, has long explored nature and issues surrounding the environment in her work. More recent installations, like “Curtain of Life”, specifically react to the issue of genetically modified organisms. Or as the Vernon Public Art Gallery, which hosts these works, phrases it: “The objective of this exhibition is to address the issues of (GMOs) and their impact on traditional food growers, especially in the Okanagan Valley region with its extensive fruit and vegetable production.”
(photo credit: Josh Palmer)

by Andy SmithPosted on

At first glance, the work of Canadian artist Brandon Constans may appear to be collage. Instead, the Ontario-based artist paints each of the objects and creatures used to build single figures. Several of the artist’s paintings are created using a process he describes as “a technique of overlapping acrylic paint and Matte Medium in various ways to create a two-dimensional embossed surface.”

by Andy SmithPosted on


Van Saro‘s current show at La Luz De Jesus Gallery in Los Angeles is called “Concrete Jungle,” and this newest collection hints at his past with street art. Whether it’s using oils on U.S. and foreign currency or adding poignancy and surrealism to street signs, Saro continues to grapple with the concepts of hope and decay in the contemporary experience. Within Saro’s work, governmental iconography is replaced with the faces of children, haunted animals, pop culture references, and instruments of destruction. Saro was last featured on HiFructose.com here.

by Andy SmithPosted on

It’s no surprise that Saudi Arabia-born, Arizona-based artist/teacher Nathaniel Lewis was once a toy designer. Yet, although some of his newer sculptures have the bright, primary color schemes and wooden textures of old-school toys for children, the themes of series like “Little Terrors” are decidedly more complex. Depicting a TSA line, with workers, equipment, and explosives, Lewis confronts a common source of tension, anxiety, and frustration for adults.