by Andy SmithPosted on

Czech artist Richard Stipl began his career as a painter, before moving on to the unsettling figurative sculptures for which he’s now known. The artist, based in Prague, conveys varying emotions and uses both two-dimensional and three-dimensional ideas to wrestle with humanity. A statement maintains that the work toils with the idea of creating art in itself. Materials used include oil on wax, ink on wood, clay, silver leaf, and several other tools.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Notice a mushroom that looks a little different than the rest? Hi-Fructose Magazine co-founder Attaboy has started to “plant” 100 hand-painted mushroom works across the U.S. This scavenger hunt heads to Los Angeles (and in particular, Glendale, Burbank, and Santa Monica) next, and you can follow his Instagram account to see what’s out there.

by Andy SmithPosted on


Kirsten Deirup, a New York-based artist, crafts surreal, sometimes unsettling paintings that toy with perspective and expectations. At times, the viewer may be unsure of what the creatures or objects at the center of her works are in truth. Yet, the engrossing quality to her works carries through.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Okuda San Miguel

The 43rd volume of Hi-Fructose will be here in April 2017! Pre-order the issue here. You can also subscribe to Hi-Fructose here.

Featured in this issue is: the paintings and sculptures of Okuda, a multi-page feature on the “War Toys” series of photographs by Brian McCarty, the architecture-inspired illustrations of Eric Wong, David Henry Nobody, Jr., an exhibitionist of the highest order in disguise, David Moreno who seems to draw lines of his house sculptures with wire instead of pencil, embroiderist Michelle Kingdom, the dynamic paintings of Hueman, the nature-infused sculptures of Kim Simonsson’s sculptures, plus multi-page reviews on new books from Junko Mizuno and Chuck Sperry. And a special 16-page sketchbook section on the art of Matt Gordon!

by Andy SmithPosted on


The billowed rugs and other objects in Antonio Santin’s ghostly oil paintings are rendered with unsettling realism. The Madrid native works in “elaborate still-lifes,” as he alters his subjects to create new realities. The artist taps into the tradition of Spanish Tenebrism and a sculptural background to dream up and execute these works on canvas. When photographed from a distance, the work still turns heads, with the viewer attempting to understand what he or she is seeing. He was featured in Hi-Fructose Vol. 18 and was last featured on HiFructose.com here.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Huang Po Hsun’s vibrant, bombastic paintings move between the familiar and the utterly otherworldly. These works, primarily acrylic on canvas, can feel like underwater carnivals or bubbling abstractions. The artist seems to be retrofitting icons from our world into his own flamboyant dreams.