by CaroPosted on

New york-based Dominican artist Samuel Gomez (first featured here) creates enormous detailed renderings with a steam-punk aesthetic. Using graphite and ink, Gomez’s work offers a glimpse into a mysterious dystopian society dominated by machinery. His drawings are particularly well known for their impressive larger than life size, with some pieces measuring up to 18 feet long. His latest pieces, titled “Decrypted Savants” and “Oasis” will be revealed on July 31st at Mike Wright Gallery in Denver.

by CaroPosted on

For Canada’s foremost ‘pop artist’ Gary Taxali (first featured in HF Vol. 4), the artist’s first major retrospective exhibition in Ontario was a long time coming. Currently on view at Design on Riverside, “Here and Now: The Art of Gary Taxali” features hundreds of Taxali’s personal and professional works over the years in a salon-style presentation of paintings, toys and objects, and assemblages of his most popular prints. The artist is recognized worldwide for his tinted illustrations of cartoon characters and vintage-inspired typography, which have appeared in the likes of New York Times, GQ, and Rolling Stone.

by Nathan SpoorPosted on

Multimedia artist Hilary White (covered here) creates vividly colorful sculptural works that delve into the symbolic, the altered, and the literal exploration of the “now” within the framework of time. White has an upcoming two-person exhibit with Hannah Stouffer, whom she originally found out about through social media. White found that Stouffer’s range of material and aesthetic to be something she immediately connected with, and set in motion the beginnings of what would eventually become the exhibit titled “Ingress Egress” which opens July 24th at Paradigm Gallery in Philadelphia, PA. 

by CaroPosted on

This last Friday, the Museum of Art and History in Lancaster, California (MOAH) celebrated over twenty years of toy art with their retrospective exhibition, “The Art of Toys”. The exhibit is the first of its kind for the west coast, featuring some of the movement’s most memorable pieces by artists and their manufacturers. The first modern designer toys hit the market in the 1990s, with many of their creators originating in the Lowbrow, New Contemporary, and even graffiti scenes. Recognizing the potential for the collectibility of their characters, participating artists like Tim Biskup, Mark Ryden, Nathan Jurevicius, and even Hi-Fructose’s own Attaboy, began marketing their designs to collectors as limited editions.

by CaroPosted on

Corey Helford Gallery in Los Angeles just announced that they are moving to a new space, and they are saying goodbye to their Circa gallery with one of their most popular group exhibitions, “Art Collector Start Kit 3″. Opening this Saturday, the exhibit (previously covered here) annually showcases smaller works from both well established and new names in the New Contemporary scene. This year’s show is no less eclectic and presents 12″ x 12″ sized pieces from Brandi Milne, Hannah Yata, Hikari Shimoda (HF Vol. 29), Hirabayashi Takahiro, KiSung Koh, Korin Faught, Lori Nelson, Lu Cong, Naoto Hattori (HF Vol. 7 and 35), Yoh Nagao, and Yoko d’Holbachie (HF Vol. 6 cover artist), among over 30 artists.

by CaroPosted on

Throughout his career, self taught Yorkshire based painter Tony South has portrayed English daily life with a unique sense of humor. His portraits of animal subjects with a heavy metal streak are depicted in common day scenes like drinking tea and reading the morning newspaper. South’s painting style has been described as “Rockwellian”, referring to illustrator Norman Rockwell who painted detailed idyllic scenes of American life. South paints from life with similar realism, building a playful and surreal narrative from his social observations.