by Andy SmithPosted on

Stephanie Corr Gartanutti started as a painter, but after multiple sclerosis had diminished her fine motor skills for a period, she began to use sculpting as method to both create and cope. Each of her figures begins with a single piece of wire, and then “the wire is cut, shaped and fastened to itself. Then repeated again and again. Later in the process the wire will be woven through until it becomes a substantial object, that can be further manipulated and cut into shape.”

by Andy SmithPosted on

Scott Musgrove’s 7.5-foot-tall, 12-foot-wide triptych “The Sanctuary” is finally complete. The artist spent nearly three years on the piece—made from oil on panel, wood, bronze, and glass—while simultaneously working on shows and other projects. (Musgrove was last featured on HiFructose.com here.) Below, the artist shares exclusive commentary on the creation of this piece with Hi-Fructose.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Lien Truong calls her recent works “a frenetic amalgamation of western and Asian painting techniques and philosophies.” The artist’s choice of materials—oils, silk, thread, cotton, acrylics, and antique 24k gold-leaf obi thread—create an absorbing cacophony of culture and honed skills. The series “Mutiny in the Garden,” in particular, take on varying and converging histories.

by Andy SmithPosted on

In the series “Ça va aller,” photographer Joana Choumali adds embroidery to images captured of her African hometown, Abidjan, in the days after the March 2016 Grand-Bassam terrorist attack that took 19 lives and injured 33. She began embroidering as a way to cope, with the series evolving from this approach. The artist observed a melancholic population following the event.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Johan Van Mullem‘s ghostly drawings take shape and dissipate across the page, often taking the form of weathered faces and muscular appendages. The artist is known for his dramatic paintings, yet even in the form of pencil, pen, and charcoal, the supernatural aspect of Van Mullem’s practice comes through.

by Andy SmithPosted on

A collaboration between Keiichi Tanaami and Oliver Payne pairs mythology-inspired creatures and “bullet hell,” video-game inspired iconography. Tanaaami’s works are drawn, while “Payne had meticulously applied bullet hell stickers upon” them. The works are collected in the show “Perfect Cherry Blossom,” running at Tokyo’s Nanzuka through April 21. Tanaaami was featured on the cover of Hi-Fructose Vol. 38.