by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Hypnagogia is the barely-conscious state right before we drift off to sleep, where dreams and reality mix for a brief moment. It is also the title of Koplin Del Rio Gallery’s upcoming group show in Los Angeles, showing April 11 through May 23. “Hypnagogia” features a collection of colorful, surreal works from Alex Gross (HF Vol. 21), F. Scott Hess, Josh Dorman, Mikel Glass, and Jerry Meyer. Floating specters, anthropomorphic objects, and psychedelic dreamscapes abound in this varied array of figurative paintings. Check out our preview below.

by CaroPosted on

Closing this weekend is La Luz de Jesus gallery’s juried show, “Laluzapalooza”, which sets out to find and highlight new names from the LA art scene each year. Since the ’80s, this exhibition has seen several iterations and thousands of submissions spanning kitsch to pop culture and La Luz’s claim to fame, Pop Surrealism. This year’s installment is as eclectic as ever with a focus on labor-intensive work of all mediums. Take a look at our photos from the show after the jump!

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Across her work in sculpture, photography, installation, and performance, Julie Rrap interrogates common symbols of femininity. Her somewhat disquieting work points to the idea of gender as a performance — one that is sometimes painful and uncomfortable to execute. Well-heeled feet are at the focus of many of Rrap’s works, such as her sculpture Stepping Out, which features a pair of severed women’s feet that have grown fleshy heels like a sort of impractical evolutionary mechanism. The piece hints at the pressure women face to modify their bodies to fit impossible beauty standards.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Bedford Gallery in Walnut Creek, CA shines a spotlight on artists who use air as a sculptural medium in their show “BLOW UP,” on view April 26 through June 21. The featured artists are Claire Ashley, Lee Boroson, Lewis deSoto, Patrick Flibotte, Billie G. Lynn, Guy Overfelt, Momoyo Torimitsu, Christo and Jean-Claude, and Andy Warhol, and each person has his or her own unique take on inflatables.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

While some artists view yarn bombing as purely decorative, Olek (HF Vol. 29) often swathes objects in crochet to draw attention to important socio-political issues. Known for the outspoken messages in her large-scale, colorful work, she was recently invited to create a piece in New Delhi, India for the St+art Delhi street art festival. For her canvas, Olek chose one of the local homeless shelters called “Raine Basera,” which provide people with temporary lodging overnight. With the help of legions of volunteers and donations from Indian fashion labels, Olek beautified the shelter with bright yellow, purple, and red crocheted fabrics that evoke India’s famously vibrant textiles. Though it’s visually alluring, the piece ultimately imparts a sobering message about the reality of poverty in New Delhi — and many major cities around the world.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on


Alex Eckman-Lawn

Paradigm Gallery + Studio in Philadelphia is planning a group show that they envision as an antidote to our image-saturated culture, where we consume visual information so rapidly it all starts to become noise. “Scenic Route” will be on view March 27 through May 16 and features innovative takes on landscapes from Erin M. Riley (whose last solo show we featured recently here), Alex Eckman-Lawn, Amze Emmons, and Jason Andrew Turner.