by CaroPosted on

Last year, Portland based artist Peter Gronquist made a remarkable departure from his dramatic taxidermy sculptures in favor of more abstract explorations. He continues to experiment with color and form in his latest body of work for “All of the Above”, opening on Saturday at Soze Gallery in Los Angeles. The show expands on his 2014 exhibition “The Great Escape” which featured infinity boxes of holographic war planes and firearms, a recurring motif in Gronquist’s art.

by CaroPosted on

Brooklyn based artist Ray Bartkus has toyed with the idea of reflections in his paintings, drawings and street art work, but not quite like this. When he was invited to paint a building along Šešupė River in Marijampole, Lithuania, the idea to paint it upside down was undeniable. “I never did anything with the reflection in the river before, but since the building was next to it, it was kind of an obvious thing to consider,” he says.

by CaroPosted on

Denmark based artist Rune Christensen tells stories in the tattoos and printed clothing of his decorated figures. As a self taught painter with a graffiti background, Christensen is well traveled and has collected his visual inspiration from all over the world. He sources his motifs from the iconography and textiles of cultures including Asian, South American, North African and Native American. Christensen’s portraits of women, men and children are simple in composition and palette, yet complex is the depiction of their symbolism which has layered meaning.

by CaroPosted on

The vivid watercolor paintings and drawings of Henk Pander reflect on a lifetime of experiences – memories of Nazi-occupied Europe, the Vietnam war, and 1960s counterculture all make their way into his dramatic imagery set against the backdrop of Oregon. Pander first moved to Portland from the Netherlands in the 1960s, and continued to work as a stage set designer through the 70s and 80s, owing to his theatrical style. There is a surrealism in his realism. That is to say, his works capture the nightmare of real life disasters, death, disease and pollution. With the technique of European masters like Holbein and Dutch landscape painters, many images find the quiet moments before and after death, in spite of their horrifying circumstances.

by CaroPosted on

Venezuelan artist Jota Leal and Polish artist Dariusz Zawadzki each mix elements of the fantastic and the surreal in their artworks. The two artists headline Copro Gallery‘s current group exhibition “Morpheus”, so named after its co-curators James Cowan and Morpheus Gallery in Las Vegas. Zawadzki’s series exhibits the artist’s skill in different media, mixing up oil painting, watercolor, and hand-embellished giclee pieces. His portraits of what look like post-apocalytpic villians out of Mad Max are treated with the rendering of old master painters.

by CaroPosted on

The work of Philadelphia based artist Yis Goodwin, aka “Nosego” (covered here) is instantly recognizable for his psychedelic portrayal of animals morphing into their surroundings. Nosego’s new series leads us through the artist’s subconscious in his exhibit at Thinkspace Gallery, “Along Infinite River”. The show, which opened last Saturday, features a variety of multimedia pieces including acrylic on panel paintings, drawings and an installation of colorful wall mounted sculptures.