by CaroPosted on

Taipei, Tawain based artist Hsiao-Ron Cheng, has a certain calmness and serenity about her personality that is reflected in her digital illustrations. Her earlier work, first featured in Hi-Fructose Vol. 24, portrayed wistful, fairytale-like scenes, but more recently, Cheng has shifted her focus to realistically rendered portraits of people in soft, pastel colors. For the past year, Cheng has elaborated on her portraiture by incorporating natural elements and detail in her subject’s expressions and fashion.

by Nathan SpoorPosted on

From her studio in Barcelona City, Spain, artist Peca meditates over a series of new oil paintings on panels. Having been an artist since childhood, Peca feels that a new world opened up to her recently when she began meditating. The artist feels that her works are self-portraits, and are ways for her to communicate the encrypted experiences that she experiences in life. Peca’s paintings feature strange spiritual entities- multi-eyed furry creatures made of ‘star stuff’ that bleed strawberry juice, and exhale galaxies. Join us as Peca gives Hi Fructose an exclusive peek into her thoughts about art and life, while sharing a few images of new paintings she has just finished for her debut solo exhibit at La Luz de Jesus gallery in Los Angeles.

by CaroPosted on

Vilnius, Lithuania based photographer Ceslovas Cesnakevicius says that he first got into taking pictures for the purpose of creating his surrealistic photo-manipulations. A browse through his Facebook page will transport you into a dreamy other-world where magic is real; old-timey explorers ride hot air balloons made of puffy white clouds, while men in top hats enjoy a sunny afternoon snooze in paper sail boats. His latest series titled “The Zoo” imagines what it would be like if we shared our every day world with wild animals in whimsical black and white images.

by CaroPosted on

Japanese artist Stephanie Inagaki’s black and white charcoal drawings depict female figures that are not only an embodiment of her roots, but also of herself as an artist and a woman. For the past couple of years, she has been incorporating the Japanese ghost folklore and mythology of her culture into what she describes as “pillars of inspiration”; tall, bold, creative women, often self-portraits, that represent the well rounded woman Inagaki aspires to be. Previously featured on our blog, she likens the figures in her drawings to the Creation and Destruction goddesses like Kali from India or Izanami from Japan, and there is generally an underlying theme of life and death throughout. Inagaki invited Hi-Fructose into her new studio in Los Angeles to give us a preview and tell us more about the direction of where her work is going.

by Sasha BogojevPosted on

A riot cop covered in flames in the middle of the street, Claude Monet’s poppies swallowed by a hole in the sky, and a large ship tearing up the Earth’s surface, leaving a bloody scar behind it- these are images Pejac recently shared on his Facebook page, where he just announced his highly anticipated solo exhibition in London. Known primarily for his striking “public interventions”, works that cleverly mix illusion and reality, fantasy and familiarity featured here, the Barcelona based street artist is once again moving his work from the public arena and into the gallery.

by CaroPosted on

Melbourne, Florida based artist Derek Gores relates creating collage art to a dreamy, abstract search, digging through representational images to find beauty. Previously featured here on our blog, Gores has said that his primary motivation as an artist is to combine elements and make something new, a fundamental principle of collage. His colorful collages borrow clippings from recycled magazines, maps, and labels, reassembled into bright images of figures that pull both contemporary and vintage design styles.