by Andy SmithPosted on

Ahn Sun Mi, a South Korea-born artist, digitally manipulates her entire body to create self-portraits that somehow add more honesty and vulnerability, instead of covering up truth. Sun Mi’s work proves that there’s no end to our complexity, as she examines her own endless facets. Even when the work contains multiple versions of the same body part, the result is something new each time.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Life and death are major themes explored through the work of Claire Morgan, a U.K.-based artist who uses taxidermy and invisible wire to create objects that express both ideas. The result is a moment in time, one that conveys the beauty of the animal, its fragility, and our own strained relationship with nature. In a statement, Morgan says, “Through my work, I am looking at everyday life and death; and the ideas of entertainment, consumption, meaninglessness and loneliness are a part of that.”

by CaroPosted on

“When I started to work in three-dimensions, I became free,” says artist Mariko Kusumoto. The Japanese multi-media artist, now based in Massachusetts, has found fantasy in the ordinary since she was a little girl, digging through her grandmother’s dresser for treasures to play with. Today, she uses a transparent synthetic fabric to bring her imagination to life, creating wearable art that blurs the line between fashion and sculpture.

by CaroPosted on

When asked about his main interest in photography, Ole Marius Joergensen once said that rather than capturing a version of reality, he loves to create illusions. The Oslo based photographer has a background in film that shows in his cinematic and atmospheric images, described as appearing almost unreal, or as Joergensen puts it, “a Norwegian strain of surrealism”. This is especially true of his new series “Behind the Curtains,” a surreal set of images shown through the eyes of his inquiring subjects, and catching them in moments of forbidden fascination.

by CaroPosted on

Pittsburgh based artist David Burton’s striking assemblages are made out of vintage toys and other found objects as he happens upon them, layered into puzzle-like creations. His near-obsessive layering of objects recalls the work of other assemblage artists, like Kris Kuksi, infused with a sense of playfulness despite their dark color. Sourced everywhere from local thrift shops to his walks on the beach, the objects that Burton features are also his main source of inspiration.

by CaroPosted on

Olaf Breuning is a Swiss-born, New-York based artist known for his experimental multimedia works, spanning photographs, videos, drawings and installations, sometimes mixed together, that regularly make use of pop-culture imagery. Often described as “outlandish”, his art also addresses ideas about consumerism, stereotypes, gender clichés, and analyzes the relationship between art and kitsch. Among these is his bizarre photo series “The Art Freaks”, which originally debuted in 2011, and is being revisited in the artist’s 15-year retrospective, “The Madness That We Call Reality”.