by CaroPosted on

Hongmin Lee is best known as one third of the Korean art team Goo For Brothers, an increasingly popular collective that Lee founded with his friends and fellow artists Seungchul Oh and Jaejung Beck. They have been creating art together since the early 2000s, working in various media from illustration, fine art, graffiti, comics and graphic novels, and animation. Their work shares a common love for kaiju and experimental imagery, and though Lee has enjoyed collaboration in a group, he’s recently focused on building his solo career as a painter and graphic novelist.

by CaroPosted on

Hi-Fructose Vol. 14 cover artist Greg “Craola” Simkins, featured here on our blog, pulls ideas from his childhood- his favorite cartoons, old comics, and vintage packaging- and ties it all together to create art that gives a feeling of being a kid again. The Los Angeles based artist has said that his journey to being an artist began with drawing on the wall after everyone would go to sleep, and his dreams of things that go bump in the night continue to inform his surrealistic works.

by CaroPosted on

Seattle based sculptor Mike Leavitt is well known for his brand of satire in various media. Featured here on our blog, he is widely recognized for his “Art Army” series depicting other famous visual artists, musicians, actors and politicians, and just recently, made headlines for his action figure of Democratic candidate Bernie Sanders. This month, he debuted a new series entitled “King Kuts”, in the artist’s words, the “16 best film directors ever carved in wood”.

by CaroPosted on

A new public art installation at Bristol University in England is garnering attention for its captivating use of wood samples from more than 10,000 tree species. Titled “Hollow”, the installation is a collaboration by architects Zeller & Moye and artist Katie Paterson, who were inspired by the natural design of a forest canopy. Meant to represent the varying heights of trees in a forest, “Hollow” has an almost Tetris-like appearance, where the trees’ different sizes, colors and textures come together to form a shape like a puzzle- in the artist’s words, “a microcosmos of all the world’s trees”.

by CaroPosted on

Andrew Schoultz’s art is filled with chaotic imagery, expressing a rather dystopian vision through a variety of techniques, from sculpture to collage, street art to installations to paintings. Featured here on our blog, his eclectic work cultivates an arsenal of personal symbolism: fragments of dollar bills, fractured Grecian urns, ripped American flags, war horses, and slave ships are just a few of the symbols he uses to juxtapose Western culture with allusions to conflict and exploitation.

by CaroPosted on

New York based painter Walton Ford, featured here on our blog, is well known for his monumental watercolors of animals. From his tongue-in-cheek depictions of King Kong, to mythical 60 foot serpents, and epic battles between beasts, his works take the visual aesthetic of traditional natural history painting and apply it to an often bizarre and fantastical narrative. Ford recently debuted six new paintings at Paul Kasmin’s booth at Frieze New York, an homage to the incredible journey of a black panther.