by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

UK graphic designer and artist Chris Labrooy riffs on custom car culture in his latest digital illustration series, “Tales of Auto Elasticity.” A follow-up to last year’s “Auto Aerobics,” in which Labrooy placed his bendy, sculptural low riders in a city park, “Tales of Auto Elasticity” shows pick-up trucks with yogic flexibility bending to extreme degrees in a rural parking lot. Though Labrooy’s work exists only on the computer screen, it evokes sculptures like Erwin Wurm’s pudgy sports cars (featured in HF Vol. 22) and Ichwan Noor’s Beetle sphere (covered here). Perhaps Labrooy should consider sculpture as his next step.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

While Brooklyn-based duo FAILE (featured in HF Vol. 18) first garnered attention for their street art, they have made a name for themselves with their mixed-media works and immersive installations. Their collage-like imagery borrows from vintage storybook illustrations and punk rock poster art alike and they seem to enjoy pouring on the sensory overload. The duo currently has a show at Allouche Gallery in New York, “FAILE: Works on Wood: Process, Paintings and Sculpture.”

by CaroPosted on

Japanese artist known as Mr., a member of Takashi Murakami’s Kaikai Kiki collective, earned worldwide attention by directing the music video for Pharrell Williams’ “It Girl”. His vibrant, Pop Art-inspired paintings of Anime characters and graffiti elements have been likened to “the display in one’s dirty bedroom.” On November 22nd, Seattle Museum of Art’s Asian Art Museum will present his first major museum retrospective in the United States. As a full retrospective of Mr.’s career, the exhibit will include his early paintings and drawings, and film work, to a new series of paintings created for the show.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Interested in the intersection between tech and architecture, interdisciplinary design studio Loop.pH (composed of Mathias Gmachl and Rachel Wingfield) creates interactive, site-specific installations that allow the public to engage with budding technologies and scientific concepts in novel ways. One of their latest works, “Atmeture,” was on view at the Letchworth Fire & Fright Festival, which took place on October 28 through November 6 in Letchworth, UK. “Atmeture” invited viewers to walk through an illuminated, porous tunnel in which fibers inflated and deflated with a breath-like motion. Though a bright, visual spectacle on the outside, the breathing work of art fostered a calming, meditative space in its interior.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Colombian artist Johan Barrios seems to be fascinated with how quickly the superficial veneer of propriety can disintegrate. His well-heeled and well-groomed characters are outfitted with all the signifiers of upper class status — blouses neatly tucked into pencil skirts, tailored blazers, leather couches. Yet by omitting select details in his realistically-rendered works, Barrios endows them with a sinister tone. In one piece, a woman lies despondent on a glossy, tile floor. Black party balloons hover over her like an ominous cloud. A creeping suspicion sets in as one begins to wonder whether this polished world hides dark secrets.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

London-based, internationally recognized street artist Above will debut his latest body work, “Remix,” at Inner State Gallery in Detroit for his first US solo show in five years this Friday, November 21. Known for his signature upward-pointing arrow, which Above has propagated in more than 100 cities since 2001, the anonymous artist is taking a new approach to his famous image for “Remix.”