by Andy SmithPosted on

Turkish-American designer Eda Yorulmazoğlu crafts wild costumes, with both distinct body of works and individual creatures as part of her repertoire. Part-fashion designer, part-textile artist, she navigates several spheres, all carrying an absurdism and vibrancy bolstered by bringing them out into the public.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Giovanni Forlino’s vibrant paintings and drawings move between dreamlike scenes, grotesque characters, and wild creatures of the natural world. His surreal, monstrous subjects, in particular, fill the space as if they are on the cusp of breaking out of it.

by Andy SmithPosted on

The fantastical graphite drawings of Ethan Murrow have a sense of both realism and absurdism in how they examine the Western experience. In particular, Murrow has a fascination with discovery and reckoning with the world around us. Murrow was last featured on HiFructose.com here.

by Andy SmithPosted on

John Bisbee, who welds and manipulates 12-inch spikes, has always operated under one mantra: “Only nails, always different.” In recent pieces, his diverse output bends the nails into an enormous snake, a tree, and more abstract forms. Not only are the subjects depicted varying wildly, but the style in which the nails comprise them: sometimes rigid and geometric, elsewhere chaotic.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Four months after it was announced that Kehinde Wiley and Amy Sherald would be painting the presidential portraits for former President Barack Obama and First Lady Michelle Obama, the pieces have been unveiled. Wiley, who was the cover artist for Hi-Fructose Vol. 36, debuted a characteristically vibrant and absorbing portrait for the 44th President of the United States, seated against an overgrowth of flowers and foliage. Sherald’s striking painting of the former first lady implemented a dress with a design reminiscent of the work of Dutch abstract painter Piet Mondrian. Sherald was last mentioned on HiFructose.com here.

by Andy SmithPosted on


(A collaboration with Celeste Byers)

Aaron Glasson’s murals, though surreal and vibrant in an otherworldly sense, are firmly grounded in reality, often depicting real people and their personal journeys. The artist, born in New Zealand and living in the U.S., crafts murals across the world, in addition to work in illustration and gallery paintings. He cites his themes as “relationship to the natural environment, community empowerment and education, indigenous knowledge, the subconscious, and the unseen.” Several of his recent murals are collaborations with artist Celeste Byers.