by CaroPosted on

Greg ‘Craola’ Simkin’s childhood memories have long played an important role and inspiration for his artwork. The playfulness of being a child comes together with creatures of the natural world in his mythical landscapes. He calls this world “the Outside”, a place where the impossible becomes possible, and a cast of anthropomorphized animals set out on bizarre adventures. Simkins expands on this world in his upcoming solo exhibition, “Where Am I?” at KP Project/MKG, opening Saturday.

by CaroPosted on

Figurative and boldly colored, Christina West makes sculptures that combine both serious and playful subject matter. Often, she employs scale to disorient her viewer and emphasize a certain sense of isolation. West contradicts their feeling of quiet loneliness with her loud palette. She paints her sculptures in a hot pink or bold white, a reference to the classical figures that inspire her. Take a look at her latest series, “Intimate Strangers”, after the jump.

by CaroPosted on

One could say that Surrealism as a movement is a way for artists to seek distraction from the mundane and engage in fantasy. On his current exhibition at AFA Gallery, painter Daniel Merriam shares, “Although I may be guilty of a little denial, it’s enabled me to go to the edge and back, which is kind of where people expect an artist to go.” Spanning over 20 new watercolor paintings, titled “Now You See Me: The Art of Escapism”, he allows himself to overcome the limitations of reality in this latest series.

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Shepard Fairey (interviewed here) is now working on his largest mural to date in Detroit. Located at ONE Campus Martius at “the Belt” and measuring 180′ x 60′ feet, it is a permanent fixture to the area playing host to his upcoming solo exhibition, “Printed Matters”. Opening this Friday at Library Street Collective, the show will feature a variety of Fairey’s latest printed materials, serigraphs on paper, collage, and editions on paper and metal. Check out our coverage of the mural in progress after the jump.

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In today’s advertising world, it’s almost impossible the avoid visual landscape of company brand names and logos. We endulge in a pop culture that is virtually paid for and made possible by “product placement”, creating often unwelcome interruptions. This Saturday, CHG Circa gallery’s artists have chosen to interrupt their own imagery in “Product Displacement”. Consumerism is a necessary evil to a healthy economy that has intrigued artists for decades. Perhaps the most famous example is Andy Warhol, whose works like the Campbell soup cans forced us to reckon with big business’ presence in our lives. Artists such as Eric Joyner, Buff Monster, Shag, Brandi Milne, Richard J. Oliver, Andrew Brandou, Ron English, and Sylvia Ji take a cue from artists like Warhol to publicize their own experiences with advertising.

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On Saturday night, Heart N Soul Gallery in Culver City joined forces with some all-star New Contemporary artists to raise funds for the Aurelia Foundation. The foundation was created to provide funding and support for programs like “Step by Step”, enriching the lives of disabled adults. The charity is very close to home for the gallerist, whose daughter is one of the many young adults that receive assistance from these programs. Among the artists who have contributed both original, new and previous works to the cause include AJ Fosick, Ana Bagayan, Bob Doucette, Clayton Bros, James Jean, Lola, Marion Peck, Mark Ryden, Martin Witfooth, Naoto Hattori, Nate Frizzell, Shepard Fairey, Steven Daily, and more.