by Andy SmithPosted on

Rebecca Yanovskaya uses ballpoint pen and gold leaf to craft mythological retellings and otherworldly narratives.The Toronto-based artist moves between personal gallery work and illustrations. Among her influences, she counts “decorative arts, neoclassical and Pre-Raphaelite arts, and theatrical costuming.”

by Andy SmithPosted on

Josh Keyes further pushes his signature “eco-surrealism” with a new collection of acrylic paintings under the title “Implosion.” The new show at Thinkspace Gallery takes us to a post-human time, a bleak reality in which the natural world goes on despite the chaos we wreaked upon it. In this world, human artifacts and even animals are adorned with graffiti, our final communication with a planet we put in peril.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Josie Morway’s oil paintings are striking representations of the natural world, typically adorned with some combination of wild animals, symbols, text, or abstractions. With her bold subjects and engrossing lighting, she offers reflections on beauty, the universal language of flora and fauna, and messages that are less clear upon first inspection.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Adam Crawford’s paintings are a mix of sharp, vibrant geometric forms and grotesque beasts, appearing in both shared spaces and separate studies. The Philadelphia-based artist uses acrylics, spraypaint, and an array of surfaces for his works. Crawford was recently chosen for the juried exhibition “Delusional” at Jonathan Levine Gallery, which kicked off on Aug. 9.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Lu Cong is known for his striking portraits, whether rendered in oil, watercolor, colored pencil, or all three. His latest work toys with form, blending textures, tools, and styles to create evocative pieces. The artist was last featured on HiFructose.com here.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Noah Harris and Andy Biddle are the duo behind “Salvation,” a stop-motion film made entirely with found objects that tells the story of the creation of Earth, the evolution of mankind, and the impending end. All of these narratives are told using items found in flea markets and other thrifting spots, with all motion done in-camera.