by Andy SmithPosted on

Deborah Simon, a Virginia-born, New York-based artist, creates sculptures that explore “the reality of the animal and the vulnerability imbued in toy.” Though her sculptures appear to be taxidermy, series like “Flayed Animals” are made entirely from hand. She uses materials like polymer clay, faux fur, acrylic paint, wire, foam, glass, and embroidery materials to create these animals, mostly focusing on bears.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Since the 1980s, Calvin Nicholls has created paper sculptures that blend 2D and 3D processes, cutting and layering paper for works that escape from the canvas. The artist typically focuses his efforts on creatures from the animal kingdom, emulating the forms of nature only using one or two colors and a meticulous process. The artist says he enjoys white on white, in particular, “due to the emphasis which is placed on texture and form.”

by Andy SmithPosted on


Louise Riley, an artist based in the London, began sewing because frankly, she was “too fast at painting.” She found that embroidery, in particular, gave her a chance to really immerse herself and understand what she was creating. And then one day, she tried a new experiment, using a mattress as her canvas.

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Netherlands-based artist Pim Palsgraaf created both 2D and 3D work that tackles urbanization and the effect “development” has on the world around us. His “Multiscape” series, in particular, is informed partially by the artist living in the industrial part of Rotterdam. The series highlights the “outgrowths of urban architecture.”

by Andy SmithPosted on

Czech artist Richard Stipl began his career as a painter, before moving on to the unsettling figurative sculptures for which he’s now known. The artist, based in Prague, conveys varying emotions and uses both two-dimensional and three-dimensional ideas to wrestle with humanity. A statement maintains that the work toils with the idea of creating art in itself. Materials used include oil on wax, ink on wood, clay, silver leaf, and several other tools.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Notice a mushroom that looks a little different than the rest? Hi-Fructose Magazine co-founder Attaboy has started to “plant” 100 hand-painted mushroom works across the U.S. This scavenger hunt heads to Los Angeles (and in particular, Glendale, Burbank, and Santa Monica) next, and you can follow his Instagram account to see what’s out there.