by Andy SmithPosted on

Norman Rockwell Museum connects the work of American illustrators to the history of narrative realism in the upcoming exhibition “Keepers of the Flame: Parrish, Wyeth, Rockwell and the Narrative Tradition.” The exhibition, opening June 9 and running through Oct. 28, tethers Golden Age illustrators in the U.S. to 500 years of European painting, with artists like Maxfield Parrish, N.C. Wyeth, and Norman Rockwell featured. It arrives at a time when the genre has received renewed interest, as the Lucas Museum of Narrative Art, set to open in Los Angeles in 2022.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Coming in October: “Hi-Fructose Presents: The Art of The Mushroom,” an exploration into artists’ interpretations of the friendly, deadly, tasty, hallucinogenic, phallic, alien, and legendary mushroom. The show is curated by Hi-Fructose, premiering at Oakland’s The Compound Gallery on October 20. (Above art by Naoto Hattori.)

by Andy SmithPosted on

Franco Fasoli, also known as Jaz, is known for creating work that various wildly in scope, whether it’s his public murals or small bronze sculptures. In his gallery-friendly practice, his surreal examinations of the human condition and culture pack that humor and vibrancy in intimate doses.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Photographer Christy Lee Rogers stages her work underwater, alluding to the vibrancy and elaborate elegance of the Baroque period. Her “Hybrids” series, in particular, blends the beauty of submerged human form, plantlife, and textiles. The artist has said that her work questions and finds “understanding in the craziness, tragedy, vulnerability, beauty and power of mankind.”

by Andy SmithPosted on

The oil paintings of Lukifer Aurelius carry a surreal and mystic energy, its subjects often in a transformative state. The Brisbane artist is part of a new duo show with Alex Garant at BeinArt Gallery in Australia titled “Seeing Between,” running through May 27. The gallery says that the painter’s figures are “seemingly infused with fire or, at the very least, embers, striking a chord with perhaps our most primitive memories.”

by Andy SmithPosted on

Marc Scheff layers paint, pencil and gold leaf in poured resin and shows “the parts of ourselves we want seen and the parts we prefer to keep to ourselves.” A new show from the artist at Haven Gallery, titled “Depth Charge,” collects several of these works. It opens on May 19 and runs through June 23 at the Long Island gallery.