by Andy SmithPosted on

Adam Parker Smith, a sculptor and installation artist based in New York, creates works that offer different insights at every perspective. His sculptures, made from resin, fiberglass, steel, and preserved mylar, emulate party balloons, recalling the work of artists like Jeff Koons. Yet Smith exposes the hollow innards of his work at different angles, and calls upon inspiration from centuries past.

by Andy SmithPosted on


Carlos Bracho, a photographer from Panama, creates surreal scenes that are often a dramatic blend of nature, humanity, and abstraction. Also a biotechnologist, the artist crafts images that “explore my life experiences in images that combine frustration, loneliness and human behavior in a mixture that (also) combines nature and decay environment.”

by Andy SmithPosted on

Lene Kilde, a sculptor based in Norway, creates works in which disparate body parts create fanciful scenes. At first glance, these sculptures may appear ominous or bleak, but further time spent with the work offers hints at wistful and youthful action. Or as Kilde says in a statement,“her intention is to invite the audience to use their own imagination so that they can complete the sculptures and fill in the lines and volume by themselves.The sculptures consist (of) concrete, metal mesh and air.”

by Andy SmithPosted on

Stickymonger” is the moniker of Brooklyn-based artist Joohee Park. Cutting giant sheets of vinyl, the artist installs her pop-influenced works piece by piece. These stickers reflect a range of emotions, from anxiety and prejudice to a decidedly darker aspect of the artist.

by Andy SmithPosted on


David Jien’s works on paper and sculptures blend modern pop culture and video games with historical iconography and imagery. These hyperdetailed works can feel both mythological and like a Nintendo RPG. The Los Angeles-based artist uses colored pencil and graphite on his paper works, along with occasional use of holographic film and other elements that add to their otherworldly nature.

by Andy SmithPosted on

At first glance, the Kaitlyn Schwalje sculpture “Unfit for Consumption” appears to tell a parable of some sort. The top of the piece scene seems serene, with grazing boars and a strange liquid form taking shape. Yet, a more ominous narrative forms when one looks below. The truth is that Schwalje’s sculpture has even stranger, yet real-world origins.