by Andy SmithPosted on

Elizabeth Alexander uses classically “domestic” materials to explore femininity, domesticity, and class. Some of her largest sculptures come from handcut wallpaper, but the artist also uses porcelain teacups, pictures from coffee table books, and other goods in her creations. The artist says that “obsession, fanaticism, repetition, and process are both my muse and method.”

by Andy SmithPosted on

Italian sculptor Gehard Demetz uses small “building blocks” to construct his figurative works. In a new series of sculptures, “Introjection,” the artist pairs figures with personal belongings and religious objects “to highlight the psychological undercurrent between an individual and their belongings, and how the external can become internalized as part of the self.” The series is part of a new show at Jack Shainman Gallery in New York City, kicking off April 27 and lasting through June 3. Demetz was last featured on HiFructose.com here, and he was involved in “Turn the Page: The First Ten Years of Hi-Fructose,” which is currently at the Akron Art Museum.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Jaz Harold, a multidisciplinary artist based in New York and Tokyo, creates sculptures that mix the alluring with the unsettling. These works seem to treat the human body like a fungus, growing and duplicating itself and occasionally, behaving in a parasitic manner. The artist says her work “explores the connection between the ego, feminism, sexuality, and the flow of both inter- and intra-personal energy.”

by Andy SmithPosted on

The figures in Mo Di’s oil paintings on canvas appear as apparitions and transient, between reality and a dream. In her latest works, these surreal narratives reflect on femininity and life’s stages. The artist has her first solo show in Shanghai in the upcoming “My Dream is a Cage” at FQ Projects. The show runs from April 22 through June 30 at the gallery.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Italian sculptor Maurizio Cattelan has been a force of satire and provocativeness for the past few decades in the art world. He’s turned heads with sculptures of Pope John Paul II struck down by a meteorite, a praying Hitler in a former Warsaw Ghetto, and a taxidermied squirrel moments after suicide by self-inflicted gunshot. A new documentary, “Maurizio Cattelan: Be Right Back,” explores the life of the controversial artist.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Eggs bounce off of a stack of plates; a glass dissolves around a solid chunk of milk. Mainframe North, the Manchester-based arm of the motion design and VFX group Mainframe, recently put together a compilation of objects defying their natural properties and physics.